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Uller Uprising
     

Uller Uprising

4.0 3
by H. Beam Piper
 

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"ZNIDD SUDDABIT!" So the Ulleran challenge begins, with the rantings of a prophet and a seemingly incidental street riot. Only when a dose of poison lands in the governor-general's whiskey does it become clear that the "geeks" have had it up to their double-lidded eyeballs with the imperialist Terran Federation's Chartered Uller Company. Then, overnight, war is

Overview

"ZNIDD SUDDABIT!" So the Ulleran challenge begins, with the rantings of a prophet and a seemingly incidental street riot. Only when a dose of poison lands in the governor-general's whiskey does it become clear that the "geeks" have had it up to their double-lidded eyeballs with the imperialist Terran Federation's Chartered Uller Company. Then, overnight, war is everywhere. How it will end is in the (merely) two Terran hands of the new governor-general, a man shrewd enough to know that "it is easier to banish a habit of thought than a piece of knowledge." The problem is, the particular piece of knowledge he needs hasn't been used in 450 years.... Features an introduction by John D. Carr.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940000116470
Publisher:
Wildside Press
Publication date:
06/01/1952
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
1,055,065
File size:
467 KB

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Uller Uprising 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I bought this on a recommendation, and at only $1, it wasn't a hard decision. Overall, the story was amusing, but very shallow and short. Being mostly used to reading and writing fantasy, I found this a different sort of read. Written in an older style, the author used hyphenated compound words with irritating regularity, and broke the creative writing rule of "Show, don't tell" frequently. Conversations were often used to impart background info or other color, and very often just weren't how people would speak (especially in combat situations). All that being said, it was an amusing diversion to read.