Uller Uprising

Uller Uprising

4.0 3
by Henry Beam Piper
     
 

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H. Beam Piper was a 20th century science fiction writer. He is best known for his Terro-Human Future History series and a series of Paratime alternate history tales. The theme in many of Piper's books is best seen in Uller Uprising. Piper wrote about the past repeating itself and past events having a direct effect on the future. Uller Uprising is based on the Sepoy

Overview

H. Beam Piper was a 20th century science fiction writer. He is best known for his Terro-Human Future History series and a series of Paratime alternate history tales. The theme in many of Piper's books is best seen in Uller Uprising. Piper wrote about the past repeating itself and past events having a direct effect on the future. Uller Uprising is based on the Sepoy Mutiny. A trading company like the East India Trading Company of the 18th century has been established on Uller. Local officials rule and the humans profit and also try to help better the lives of the locals. Not all of the natives are pleased with this arrangement and a rebellion begins. It is up to Captain Carlos and his men to save the Chartered Company and the Terran Federation.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781406866568
Publisher:
Echo Library
Publication date:
07/21/2008
Pages:
120
Product dimensions:
0.28(w) x 9.00(h) x 6.00(d)

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Uller Uprising 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I bought this on a recommendation, and at only $1, it wasn't a hard decision. Overall, the story was amusing, but very shallow and short. Being mostly used to reading and writing fantasy, I found this a different sort of read. Written in an older style, the author used hyphenated compound words with irritating regularity, and broke the creative writing rule of "Show, don't tell" frequently. Conversations were often used to impart background info or other color, and very often just weren't how people would speak (especially in combat situations). All that being said, it was an amusing diversion to read.