Ultimate Field Trip #4: A Week in the 1800s

Ultimate Field Trip #4: A Week in the 1800s

by Michael J. Doolittle
     
 
How would life be different if you lived in the 18OOs? No T-shirts or jeans -- you'd wear bonnets and petticoats or button-up trousers with suspenders. No cars or buses -- you'd walk to your one-room schoolhouse, or ride in a horsedrawn buggy. No TV or video games -- instead, you'd spend your evenings playing checkers or doing needlework by candlelight.

A group of

Overview

How would life be different if you lived in the 18OOs? No T-shirts or jeans -- you'd wear bonnets and petticoats or button-up trousers with suspenders. No cars or buses -- you'd walk to your one-room schoolhouse, or ride in a horsedrawn buggy. No TV or video games -- instead, you'd spend your evenings playing checkers or doing needlework by candlelight.

A group of kids stepped back into the 1800s by going to Kings Landing Historical Settlement. For one week, they occupied a nineteenth-century village, living in a time before electricity, before cars -- even before indoor plumbing! The girls milked cows, churned butter, and spun wool. The boys drove teams of oxen, harvested corn, and fanned the forge at the blacksmith's shop. By journeying back through time, the kids learned valuable lessons about the past -- and their own lives in the present.

Susan E. Goodman and Michael J. Doolittle bring history alive in the fourth book of their Ultimate Field Trip series. Through vivid text and photographs, they record an exciting modern adventure in nineteenth-century America.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Susan Hepler
A group of middle schoolers--ecotourists from western Michigan--are followed on a week-long trip to the rainforests of Peru. There they explore bio-diversity, interact with tribesmen and school children, trade with the Yaguas, and visit the marketplace where they buy a baby sloth in hopes of returning it to the wild. But then they discover that without its mother it can't survive, and people might continue to try to sell cute baby animals to tourists. "Be careful of the message you send with your dollars," they hear--a worthwhile and unusual message in books for this age. Responsible tourism, rainforest diversity, the tacit message of adventure and taking risks, plus winning photography make this appealing to upper elementary grades. The pictures and text are enlivened with quotes from the children and their journals. A useful read-aloud for elementary children studying the rainforest and a good introduction to the "Ultimate Field Trip" series. 1999 (orig.
Children's Literature - Children's Literature
The fourth book in the "Ultimate Field Trip" series introduces readers to life in the 1800s. This resource follows a group of middle school students as they visit Kings Landing Historical Settlement in Prince William, Canada for one week and experience how young people lived during the 19th century. When the students arrive at the settlement, they are asked to remove all evidence of 20th century living--earrings, watches, sneakers, shorts, T-shirts--and don traditional clothing including petticoats, bonnets and dresses for the girls and suspenders, buttoned trousers and hats for the boys. During their visit, the students explore all aspects of life during the 1800s. They attend school at the one-room schoolhouse, play games, and complete chores--the girls tend the animals, churn butter, spin wool, bake meals, do laundry and create needlework and the boys drive teams of oxen, harvest corn and work at the sawmill, blacksmith shop and print shop. In addition to the informative, well-written text, this nonfiction book also contains interesting facts, full-color photographs with captions, a glossary, and a list of books for further reading. Other titles in this notable series include--Adventures in the Amazonian Rain Forest, Digging into Southwest Archaeology and Wading into Marine Biology. 2000, Atheneum Books for Young Readers, Ages 9 to 12, $17.00. Reviewer: Debra Briatico—Children's Literature
School Library Journal
Gr 5-8-In this series entry, middle schoolers spend a week at the Kings Landing Historical Settlement in Canada where they are immersed in the clothing, language, and attitudes of the 1800s. Gone are zippers, nail polish, T-shirts, etc. Participants must sit up straight and use words like "splendid" instead of "cool." Family life, school days, and men's and women's work are all accurately and capably discussed. In the final chapter, "Back to the Future," the children compare the positives and negatives of the 19th and 20th centuries. There is no sugarcoating here-that life was hard in the past is clearly displayed through the photographs and comments of the students. By the end of the trip, they are homesick for the world they know. Candid color photographs fill the pages. Some are boxed, and readers are asked, "What Is This Thing?" Answers are given, upside down, under the 19th-century item. Evelyn Toynton's Growing up in America: 1830-1860 (Millbrook, 1995) complements this title. This field trip is perfect for anyone interested in life in days past, and upon completing it, young people will have a greater appreciation for what is generally taken for granted.-Anne Chapman Callaghan, Racine Public Library, WI Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.|
Kirkus Reviews
This author took children on previous field trips to Adventures in the Amazonian Rain Forest (1995) and Wading into Marine Biology (1999). Here, she takes a dozen children to spend a week at the Kings Landing Historical Settlement in Prince William, Canada. Leaving Walkman and sneakers behind, the children dress in period costumes, slop the hogs, go to a one-room school and learn about everyday chores and living conditions in the 19th century. The author and photographer document the Ultimate Field Trip with photos of smiling children writing with quill pens, churning butter, setting type in the print shop, and chopping wood. They are costumed in everything from pantaloons and corsets to flowered bonnets. Color photographs also include puzzle boxes, which display an unusual object from the past. The reader is invited to guess the purpose of the object. Some are easy—for example: an iron, skate blades, or an old hat box; others, like the hearse with winter snow runners, will mystify. The answers are given in upside-down captions below each object. Since houses in the restoration span the time from 1830 to 1870, the young viewer may have difficulty sorting out the exact time period, but there are plenty flavors of times past. Readers will enjoy the lively dialogue as the children discuss what they liked and didn't like about "living" like long ago. The author concludes with a brief glossary of unfamiliar terms, suggested further reading, and the Web site of the Kings Landing Historical Settlement. (Nonfiction. 9-12)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780689830457
Publisher:
Atheneum Books for Young Readers
Publication date:
05/01/2000
Series:
Ultimate Field Trip Series
Edition description:
1 ED
Pages:
56
Product dimensions:
10.23(w) x 8.24(h) x 0.44(d)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

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