Ultimate Frozen Dessert Book

Ultimate Frozen Dessert Book

by Bruce Weinstein, Mark Scarbrough, Mark Scarbrough
     
 

Gelato may be Italian for ice cream, but The Ultimate Frozen Dessert Book is American for the sequel to the best-selling Ultimate Ice Cream Book. In the ninth installment of the wildly popular Ultimate series, powerhouse cookbook authors Bruce Weinstein and Mark Scarbrough churn out more than 500 recipes and variations for all kinds of frosty treats,

Overview

Gelato may be Italian for ice cream, but The Ultimate Frozen Dessert Book is American for the sequel to the best-selling Ultimate Ice Cream Book. In the ninth installment of the wildly popular Ultimate series, powerhouse cookbook authors Bruce Weinstein and Mark Scarbrough churn out more than 500 recipes and variations for all kinds of frosty treats, including a wide range of gelato, granita, sherbet, and semifreddo. And there's a whole chapter on cakes, pies, and other treats made with ice cream or gelato, whether home-made or store-bought! Bruce and Mark prove that when it comes to frozen desserts, ice cream is only the tip of the iceberg! Together, these two books make the ultimate compendium on frozen treats.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780060597078
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
04/26/2005
Pages:
256
Product dimensions:
7.50(w) x 9.12(h) x 0.64(d)

Related Subjects

Read an Excerpt

The Ultimate Frozen Dessert Book

A Complete Guide to Gelato, Sherbert, Granita, and Semmifreddo, Plus Frozen Cakes, Pies, Mousses, Chiffon Cakes, and More, with Hundreds of Ways to Customize Every Recipe to Your Own Taste
By Bruce Weinstein

HarperCollins Publishers, Inc.

Copyright © 2006 Bruce Weinstein
All right reserved.

ISBN: 0060597070

Blueberry Sherbet

Makes about 1 quart (can be doubled for half-gallon machines)

This simple treat is perhaps the most refreshing sherbet in the book -- it was a hit every time we took it somewhere when we were testing recipes. It's worthy of your best dessert wine.

1 ½ cups fresh blueberries (about 12 ounces)
1 ¾ cups whole milk
2 teaspoons lemon juice
¼ teaspoon salt
2/3 cup sugar
  1. Place the blueberries and ½ cup of the milk in a large blender; blend until fairly smooth, scraping down the sides of the canister as necessary. Blend in the lemon juice and salt; set aside.

  2. Warm the remaining 1 ¼ cups of milk in a medium saucepan over low heat. Stir in the sugar until dissolved; cool for 5 minutes. Pour into the blender with the blueberry puree; blend until smooth. Strain through a fine-mesh sieve into a medium bowl; refrigerate until well chilled, for at least 4 hours, or overnight.

  3. Freeze in your ice cream machine according to the manufacturer's instructions. Serve at once -- or scoop into a large container, seal well, and store in the freezer for upto 1 month; soften at room temperature for 5 minutes before serving.

Customize it!
Add any of the following to the blender with the blueberry puree:

1 peeled ripe banana, 2 tablespoons gold rum, 1 tablespoon chopped fresh mint leaves, 1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme, 2 teaspoons finely grated orange zest, 2 teaspoons vanilla extract, ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon, or ¼ teaspoon grated nutmeg.

And/or reduce the milk to 1 cup and mix ¾ cup buttermilk with the remaining milk before proceeding with the recipe.


Spumoni

Makes 6 servings

This classic frozen terrine has become a staple of Italian restaurants. Still, it's never as good as when you make your own gelato and fill the molded dessert with fresh whipped cream spiked with candied fruit.

1 quart Chocolate Gelato (page 30), or 1 quart purchased chocolate ice cream
1 pint Pistachio Gelato (page 82, half the recipe), or 1 pint purchased pistachio ice cream
¾ cup cold heavy cream
3 tablespoons confectioners' (or "powdered") sugar
¼ cup chopped glacéed cherries
  1. Line a 9 x 5-inch loaf pan with plastic wrap, pushing it into the pan's corners but also leaving enough excess over the sides that it can later be folded across the top to seal the pan.

  2. Soften the chocolate gelato or ice cream by placing it in a large bowl and mashing it with the back of a wooden spoon, just until spreadable. Spread this softened gelato or ice cream into the prepared loaf pan, covering the bottom and sides evenly but leaving a wide trough in the middle of the pan. Place the pan in the freezer to chill for 1 hour.

  3. Use the same technique as in step 2 to soften the pistachio gelato or ice cream. Again, spoon it into the loaf pan and use a rubber spatula to smooth it across the bottom and sides, making an even coating but leaving a hole in the middle of the terrine. Put the pan back in the freezer.

  4. Beat the cream and sugar in a medium bowl with an electric mixer at high speed until firm but not yet dry and buttery. Fold in the glacéed cherries. Spoon this cream into the space still open in the loaf pan, smoothing it across the top to cre-ate a layer of white that encases the terrine. Seal with the excess plastic wrap and freeze for at least 4 hours or overnight. The spumoni will stay this way for up to 2 weeks.

  5. To serve, peel back the plastic wrap and turn the loaf pan upside down on a serving platter or cutting board.Wipe the pan with paper towels soaked with hot water and wrung fairly dry (so as to have hot towels without the water that could make the terrine soggy). Gently lift off the loaf pan; remove all plastic wrap. Slice with a serrated knife as you would a loaf of bread; serve on a plate with a fork.


Continues...

Excerpted from The Ultimate Frozen Dessert Book by Bruce Weinstein Copyright © 2006 by Bruce Weinstein. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Meet the Author

Bruce Weinstein and Mark Scarbrough are the authors of the eleven-volume Ultimate cookbook series and more than a dozen other books. They are contributing editors to Eating Well and columnists for weightwatchers.com, and they contribute regularly to Cooking Light, Fine Cooking, the Washington Post, and other publications. When they're not teaching cooking on Holland America cruise ships, they live in rural Litchfield County, Connecticut, with a fairly sane collie named Dreydl.

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