The UN and Global Political Economy: Trade, Finance, and Development

Paperback (Print)
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $12.35
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 58%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (9) from $12.35   
  • New (4) from $22.86   
  • Used (5) from $12.35   

Overview

Against the backdrop of a 20-year revolt against free trade orthodoxy by economists inside the UN and their impact on policy discussions since the 1960s, the authors show how the UN both nurtured and inhibited creative and novel intellectual contributions to the trade and development debate. Presenting a stirring account of the main UN actors in this debate, The UN and Global Political Economy focuses on the accomplishments and struggles of UN economists and the role played by such UN agencies as the Department of Economic (and Social) Affairs, the United Nations Commission on Trade and Development, and the Economic Commission for Latin America (and the Caribbean). It also looks closely at the effects of the Latin American debt crisis of the 1980s, the growing strength of the World Trade Organization (WTO) in the 1990s, and the lessons to be drawn from these and other recent developments.

Indiana University Press

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

C. J. Siegman
"John Toye (British political economist) and Richard Toye (history, Cambridge Univ., UK), a father-son team, examine, as part of the United Nations Intellectual History Project, contributions to development economics by the UN and its specialized agencies. They acknowledge that, despite high aspirations by some for the UN to be the principal international organization to promote economic development, its status in the field of finance, development, and trade became ancillary to that of the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank, and the World Trade Organization, which operate independently within the UN framework. The authors explain why the UN became marginal (inter alia, the Cold War, excessive demands by Third World countries, the Latin American debt crisis, and financial resources of the IMF and World Bank). The research output of a number of prominent economists in the UN's employ, however, left a lasting legacy to the trade and development debate. The substance of the research produced by these economists (e.g., Michal Kalecki, Nicholas Kaldor) during their UN service, and the historical, political, and bureaucratic setting in which the research was performed, is clearly and informatively summarized. Of special interest to students of economic development and trade policy and policy makers in these areas. Summing Up: Recommended. Public, academic, and professional library collections." —C. J. Siegman, formerly, Federal Reserve Board/International Monetary Fund, 2004dec CHOICE
From the Publisher
John Toye (British political economist) and Richard Toye (history, Cambridge Univ., UK), a father-son team, examine, as part of the United Nations Intellectual History Project, contributions to development economics by the UN and its specialized agencies. They acknowledge that, despite high aspirations by some for the UN to be the principal international organization to promote economic development, its status in the field of finance, development, and trade became ancillary to that of the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank, and the World Trade Organization, which operate independently within the UN framework. The authors explain why the UN became marginal (inter alia, the Cold War, excessive demands by Third World countries, the Latin American debt crisis, and financial resources of the IMF and World Bank). The research output of a number of prominent economists in the UN's employ, however, left a lasting legacy to the trade and development debate. The substance of the research produced by these economists (e.g., Michal Kalecki, Nicholas Kaldor) during their UN service, and the historical, political, and bureaucratic setting in which the research was performed, is clearly and informatively summarized. Of special interest to students of economic development and trade policy and policy makers in these areas. Summing Up: Recommended. Public, academic, and professional library collections.—C. J. Siegman, formerly, Federal Reserve Board/International Monetary Fund, 2004dec CHOICE
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780253216861
  • Publisher: Indiana University Press
  • Publication date: 6/18/2004
  • Series: United Nations Intellectual History Project Series
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 416
  • Sales rank: 1,403,550
  • Product dimensions: 6.22 (w) x 9.28 (h) x 0.88 (d)

Meet the Author

John Toye is a political economist who has directed research on economic development at the Universities of Wales, Sussex, and Oxford. He has also worked as a British civil servant, as the director of a private consultancy company, and as a director of the United Nations Committee on Trade and Development. His previous books include Dilemmas of Development (2nd ed., 1993) and Keynes on Population (2000) and he has published numerous academic articles.

Richard Toye is lecturer in history at Homerton College, Cambridge. He is the author of The Labour Party and the Planned Economy, 1931-1951 (2003) and co-author, with Jamie Miller, of Cripps versus Clayton (forthcoming).

Indiana University Press

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Foreword by Louis Emmerij, Richard Jolly, and Thomas G. Weiss
Acknowledgments
List of Abbreviations
Introduction
1. The UN Trade and Development Debates of the 1940s
2. The UN Recruits Economists
3. Michal Kalecki, the World Economic Report, and McCarthyism
4. From Full Employment to Economic Development
5. The Early Terms-of-Trade Controversy
6. ECLA, Industrialization, and Inflation
7. Competitive Coexistence and the Politics of Modernization
8. The Birth of UNCTAD
9. UNCTAD under Raúl Prebisch: Success or Failure?
10. World Monetary Problems and the Challenge of Commodities
11. The Conservative Counterrevolution of the 1980s
12. What Lessons for the Future?
Appendix: List of Archival Sources
Notes
Index
About the Authors
About the UN Intellectual History Project

Indiana University Press

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)