UN Contributions to Development Thinking and Practice [NOOK Book]

Overview

UN Contributions to Development Thinking and Practice is at once a history of the ideas and realities of international development, from the classical economists to the recent emphasis on human rights, and a history of the UN's major role in shaping and implementing new development paradigms over the last sixty years. The authors show how the UN approach to development evolved since 1945 from establishing mainstream economic development approaches to later leading the charge against the orthodoxy by advocating ...
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UN Contributions to Development Thinking and Practice

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Overview

UN Contributions to Development Thinking and Practice is at once a history of the ideas and realities of international development, from the classical economists to the recent emphasis on human rights, and a history of the UN's major role in shaping and implementing new development paradigms over the last sixty years. The authors show how the UN approach to development evolved since 1945 from establishing mainstream economic development approaches to later leading the charge against the orthodoxy by advocating for full employment, poverty reduction, fairer distribution of the benefits of growth, equality of men and women, child development, social justice, and environmental sustainability -- in short, for human development.
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Editorial Reviews

Choice

"Well organized and well written, this book will be essential reading in international organization or economic development courses. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Public, academic, upper-division undergraduate and up, and professional library collections." —Choice, January 2005

Choice - S. Waalkes

One of the titles in a projected 14—volume series sponsored by the United Nations Intellectual History Project (see also Michael Ward's book in this series, Quantifying the World: UN Ideas and Statistics, CH, Oct'04), this institutional history of the UN is surprisingly readable. The product of four authors' collaboration, it tells an interesting story of UN work in development theory and practice. After a brief review of development literature, the authors break down the UN experience into five major periods. The 1940s and 1950s were foundational, with the work of Raul Prebisch and many others promulgated under UN auspices. The 1960s were the decade of development, first declared by John F. Kennedy in 1961. The 1970s saw a focus on equity in development, and the 1980s saw UN agencies being eclipsed by the International Monetary Fund and World Bank. By the 1990s, the UN Development Program restored a focus on human development that had been lost earlier. Concluding with a review of UN development ideas, the authors describe successes but do not hesitate to point out failures. Well organized and well written, this book will be essential reading in international organization or economic development courses. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Public, academic, upper—division undergraduate and up, and professional library collections.S. Waalkes, Malone College, Choice, January 2005

From the Publisher
"Well organized and well written, this book will be essential reading in international organization or economic development courses. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Public, academic, upper-division undergraduate and up, and professional library collections." —Choice, January 2005

One of the titles in a projected 14—volume series sponsored by the United Nations Intellectual History Project (see also Michael Ward's book in this series, Quantifying the World: UN Ideas and Statistics, CH, Oct'04), this institutional history of the UN is surprisingly readable. The product of four authors' collaboration, it tells an interesting story of UN work in development theory and practice. After a brief review of development literature, the authors break down the UN experience into five major periods. The 1940s and 1950s were foundational, with the work of Raul Prebisch and many others promulgated under UN auspices. The 1960s were the decade of development, first declared by John F. Kennedy in 1961. The 1970s saw a focus on equity in development, and the 1980s saw UN agencies being eclipsed by the International Monetary Fund and World Bank. By the 1990s, the UN Development Program restored a focus on human development that had been lost earlier. Concluding with a review of UN development ideas, the authors describe successes but do not hesitate to point out failures. Well organized and well written, this book will be essential reading in international organization or economic development courses. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Public, academic, upper—division undergraduate and up, and professional library collections.S. Waalkes, Malone College, Choice, January 2005

Choice

"Well organized and well written, this book will be essential reading in international organization or economic development courses. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Public, academic, upper-division undergraduate and up, and professional library collections." —Choice, January 2005

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Product Details

Meet the Author

Richard Jolly is Senior Research Fellow at the CUNY Graduate Center, where he is co-director of the United Nations Intellectual History Project.

Louis Emmerij is Senior Research Fellow at the CUNY Graduate Center, where he is co-director of the United Nations Intellectual History Project.

Dharam Ghai is Advisor to the International Labour Organization.

Frédéric Lapeyre is Professor at the Institute of Development Studies, Catholic University of Louvain, and a member of the United Nations Intellectual History Project.

Indiana University Press

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Table of Contents

Foreword
1 Has there been progress? : values and criteria for UN history 3
2 The history of development thinking from Adam Smith to John Maynard Keynes 16
3 The 1940s and 1950s : the foundations of UN development thinking and practice 49
4 The 1960s : the UN development decade : mobilizing for development 85
5 The 1970s : equity in development 111
6 The 1980s : losing control and marginalizing the poorest 138
7 The 1990s : rediscovering a human vision 169
8 Building the human foundations 186
9 Structural and sectoral change 220
10 The record of performance 247
11 UN contributions and missed opportunities 276
12 Lessons for the future : development thinking and the UN's future 299
App Country categories and distribution of population and GDP by regions 317
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