Un Voices

Overview

"The authors have cajoled, intrigued, or reassured their 73 ‘voices’
into telling a fascinating story of the UN and its institutions, which is also a story of 73
individual lives, of women and men... with their own complicated histories of emigration and education, family relationships and professional choices, hopes and successes." —from the
Foreword by Emma Rothschild

"Far from being a distant bureaucracy, the UN is composed of individuals ...

See more details below
Paperback
$27.40
BN.com price
(Save 8%)$29.95 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (21) from $1.99   
  • New (11) from $21.02   
  • Used (10) from $1.99   
Sending request ...

Overview

"The authors have cajoled, intrigued, or reassured their 73 ‘voices’
into telling a fascinating story of the UN and its institutions, which is also a story of 73
individual lives, of women and men... with their own complicated histories of emigration and education, family relationships and professional choices, hopes and successes." —from the
Foreword by Emma Rothschild

"Far from being a distant bureaucracy, the UN is composed of individuals who are reshaped by vital experiences. UN Voices gives international civil servants human faces and shows how ideas drive the grand experiment. It is a fascinating book."
—Arthur Schlesinger, Jr.

UN Voices presents the human and moving stories of an extraordinary group of individuals who contributed to the economic and social record of the
UN’s life and activities. Drawing from extensive interviews, the book presents in their own words the experiences of 73 individuals from around the globe who have spent much of their professional lives engaged in United Nations affairs. We hear from secretaries-general and presidents, ministers and professors, social workers and field workers, as well as diplomats and executive heads of UN agencies. Among those interviewed are noted figures such as Kofi Annan,
Boutros Boutros-Ghali, Alister McIntyre, Conor Cruise O’Brien, Javier Pérez de
Cuéllar, and Kurt Waldheim, as well as many less well known UN professional men and women who have made significant contributions to the international struggle for a better world. Their personal accounts also engage their contributions in dealing with such events and issues as the UN’s founding, decolonization, the rise and fall of the Berlin Wall, human rights, the environment, and
September 11, 2001.

Indiana University Press

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Foreign Affairs
This fascinating account of the UN's half century of involvement in economic and social development weaves together the personal stories and recollections of 73 UN civil servants and experts. The high politics of the Security Council are well known, but this rich oral history offers a rare glimpse at the "second UN" — the semi-independent secretariats and professionals who conduct research, promote policy ideas, and shape critical programs. The narrative traces the evolution of UN institutions and activities from the 1945 founding through the rise of trade and development commissions and up to the proliferation of conferences on human rights, gender, the environment, and globalization. What is more interesting, it provides an absorbing intellectual history of the UN's efforts to translate ideas about sustainability, basic human needs, human security, and "the responsibility to protect" into programmatic forms of international cooperation. This book, an invaluable resource for both UN reformers and historians seeking to understand the UN's role in world affairs, shows convincingly that in the international marketplace of ideas, the UN has been a major commercial center.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

Meet the Author

Thomas G. Weiss is Presidential Professor of Political Science at The CUNY Graduate
Center and Director of its Ralph Bunche Institute for International
Studies.

Tatiana Carayannis is Research Manager of the United Nations Intellectual
History Project.

Louis Emmerij is Senior Research Fellow at The CUNY Graduate
Center’s Ralph Bunche Institute for International Studies.

Richard Jolly is
Senior Research Fellow at The CUNY Graduate Center’s Ralph Bunche Institute for International
Studies and Professor Emeritus at the University of Sussex.

Indiana University Press

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Contents
Foreword
Acknowledgments
List of
Abbreviations
Introduction
Part One. Individuals Make a Difference
1.
Growing Up
The Great Depression and the Demise of the League of Nations • World War
II • Faith and Family Matters
2. Formal Education
Education at Home •
Studying Abroad
3. Serendipity and International Careers
Mentors Opening Doors
• Advanced Studies as a Gateway • Post-University Homecomings • Starting Out in Teaching and Research • Beginning in National Public Service • Juggling Family and
Professional Life
Part Two. Hope, Creativity, and Frustration
4. From 1945 through the 1950s: Hope Held High
The Establishment of the United Nations • The Universal
Declaration of Human Rights • The Marshall Plan • The Cold War • McCarthyism
• Decolonization and the Non-Aligned Movement • The UN Regional
Commissions
5. The 1960s: Widening Development Avenues
The First Development
Decade • UNCTAD and the Group of 77 • Technical Cooperation: The Road to the UNDP
• Influence of the Major Powers
6. The 1970s: Creativity Confronts
Geopolitics
The Environment and Sustainability • Oil Shocks and the NIEO •
Transnational Corporations • The Least Developed Countries • Basic Needs and
Redistribution • Women and Gender
7. The 1980s: Development Frustrated
Death of the North-South "Dialogue" • The Debt Crisis and Adjustment: A Lost Decade • The
Washington "Consensus" • The End of the Cold War and the Socialist Model
8. The 1990s and the Dawn of the Twenty-First Century: Renaissance and Reform?
Globalization •
Human Development • Human Security and the Responsibility to Protect • Global Governance and the Millennium Development Goals
Part Three. The World Organization, Ideas, and
Twenty-First-Century Challenges
9. A Revolutionary Idea: The International Civil
Service
Good Old Days? • Cold War Diversions • Geographical Representation
• Women at the UN • Organizational Culture • Reform Difficulties
10. The
Power of Ideas and People inside the UN
Leadership • The Secretaries-General
• Tensions in the System • Country Groups and International Negotiations
11.
Blending Outside Intellectual Energies
Outside Academics and Consultants •
Independent Commissions of Eminent Persons • Nongovernmental Organizations and the Private
Sector • Global Conferences
12. The Legacy and Future Intellectual
Challenges
Ideas Change International Discourse • Ideas Redefine State and Nonstate
Interests and Goals • Ideas Facilitate New Coalitions • Ideas Become Embedded in
Institutions • The UN's Future Intellectual Challenges
Annex 1. Biographical Notes of
Persons Interviewed
Annex 2. A Methodological Note: Making This Oral
History
Notes
Index of Persons Interviewed
Index of
Subjects
About the Authors
About the United Nations Intellectual History
Project

Indiana University Press

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)