The Unauthorized Guide To Pocket Pc

The Unauthorized Guide To Pocket Pc

by Michael Morrison, David Ed. Morrison, David Ed Morrison
     
 

The Unauthorized Guide to Pocket PC is the best place to start for someone seriously considering the purchase of a Pocket PC, or someone who has just made the purchase and is eager to hit the ground running and use it to its full potential. Along with exploring the major software components of the Pocket PC platform, the book also guides the reader through other…  See more details below

Overview

The Unauthorized Guide to Pocket PC is the best place to start for someone seriously considering the purchase of a Pocket PC, or someone who has just made the purchase and is eager to hit the ground running and use it to its full potential. Along with exploring the major software components of the Pocket PC platform, the book also guides the reader through other aspects of using a Pocket PC such as establishing an online connection and taking advantage of wireless communications. This book is for anyone who wants to learn how to get the most out of their Pocket PC, even beginners. No matter what model the reader has, this book will be a useful reference and learning tool.

Editorial Reviews

bn.com
All you need to succeed with your new Pocket PC! The real skinny on the hardware, the applications, syncing and desktop integration, networking, Internet and email, Windows Media Player, eBooks, games, and much more. Pocket Word, Excel, Outlook, Money, Streets: practical techniques, pitfalls, and real solutions.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780789724724
Publisher:
Pearson Technology Group 2
Publication date:
02/01/2000
Series:
Que-Consumer-Other Series
Pages:
432
Product dimensions:
7.50(w) x 9.25(h) x 0.88(d)

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Read an Excerpt

Chapter 1: Pocket PC Fundamentals

Pocket PC Represents in many ways the first of a new breed of handheld computers that offer desktop features in the palm of your hand. Although there certainly have been many previous incarnations of handheld computing devices, none have been as ambitious both in terms of hardware and software as Pocket PC. Whether the average handheld computer user desires this much sizzle in a handheld device has yet to be seen, but computer users have rarely subscribed to the "less is more" theory when it comes to power and flexibility.

This chapter takes a look at the big picture of Pocket PC and how it fits into the handheld-computing landscape. Pocket PC is competing in a market with a very dominant leader, which in many ways explains the aggressive set of features packed into the device. This chapter also puts into perspective the relationship between Pocket PC and Windows CE, Microsoft's handheld operating system that has struggled for years to find its place in the hand of every mobile computer user.

Pocket PC: The PDA Killer

It is currently impossible to speak of handheld computers without addressing the incredibly popular Palm line of handheld devices. As of this writing, the Palm line of devices and compatible clones running the Palm OS represent the lion's share of the handheld computer market. This is due to a number of reasons, not limited to a sleek design, great marketing, and a very affordable price tag. Palm devices basically set the Standard for modern Personal Digital Assistants, or PDAs. As PDAs, Palm devices provide a rich set of features that are intuitive and easy to use. Unfortunately, the Palm operatingsystem was designed purely around the PDA concept, and doesn't necessarily scale well to the demands of a full-blown handheld computer.

In today's hectic workplace, PDAs are a necessity for some, which explains the popularity of the Palm devices. However, I want to make the argument that the PDA approach to handheld computing is no different from the original spreadsheet approach to personal computing. In case you weren't wired for the early days of PC history, most of the original PCs were sold purely because of spreadsheet software that allowed people to crunch numbers much more effectively than using calculators. The spreadsheet was the killer application that initially put computers on so many desks. However, spreadsheet software eventually settled in as one of many important computer applications. Do you still perceive the spreadsheet as the killer PC application? I doubt it.

The same usage shift is currently taking place in the handheld world as Palm devices cling to their killer application (PDA software), while Pocket PC introduces a complete computing experience. In addition to functioning as a traditional PDA, a Pocket PC device also serves as a word processor, spreadsheet, navigational map, financial manager, email client, Web client, digital Walkman, digital voice recorder, digital book reader, and portable video game. These features are due to both the hardware and software of the Pocket PC platform, which are much more in line with a full-featured computer than with a PDA such as a Palm device. It's worth noting that some of the functionality built into Pocket PC devices can be added to Palm devices via third-party hardware and software, but these add-ons still run contrary to the original PDA design of Palm devices...

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