unChristian: What a New Generation Really Thinks about Christianity?and Why It Matters

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Overview

Christianity has an image problem.

Christians are supposed to represent Christ to the world. But according to the latest report card, something has gone terribly wrong. Using descriptions like "hypocritical," "insensitive," and "judgmental," young Americans share an impression of Christians that's nothing short of . . . unChristian.

Groundbreaking research into the perceptions of sixteen- to twenty-nine-year-olds reveals that Christians have ...

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unChristian: What a New Generation Really Thinks about Christianity...and Why It Matters

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Overview

Christianity has an image problem.

Christians are supposed to represent Christ to the world. But according to the latest report card, something has gone terribly wrong. Using descriptions like "hypocritical," "insensitive," and "judgmental," young Americans share an impression of Christians that's nothing short of . . . unChristian.

Groundbreaking research into the perceptions of sixteen- to twenty-nine-year-olds reveals that Christians have taken several giant steps backward in one of their most important assignments. The surprising details of the study, commissioned by Q and conducted by The Barna Group, are presented with uncompromising honesty in unChristian.

Find out why these negative perceptions exist, learn how to reverse them in a Christlike manner, and discover practical examples of how Christians can positively contribute to culture.

"This is a wonderful, thoughtful book that conveys difficult truths in a spirit of humility. Every Christian should read this, and it will likely influence the church for years to come."--Publishers Weekly, starred review

"An engaging, challenging, and morally compelling study."--Library Journal

"Essential reading for all Christian leaders."--CBA Retailers

David Kinnaman is the author of You Lost Me and president of The Barna Group. Since joining Barna in 1995, David has designed and analyzed nearly five hundred studies for a variety of churches, nonprofits, and corporations. He and George Barna write a free research report published online at www.barna.org. David and his wife, Jill, have three children and live in Ventura, California.

Gabe Lyons is the founder of Q--a learning community that mobilizes Christians to advance the common good in society--and author of The Next Christians: Seven Ways You Can Live the Gospel and Restore the World. His work represents the perspectives of a new generation of Christians and has been featured by CNN, the New York Times, Fox News, and USA Today. Gabe, his wife, Rebekah, and their three children reside in Manhattan, New York.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780801072710
  • Publisher: Baker Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 4/1/2012
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 204,024
  • Product dimensions: 5.40 (w) x 8.40 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

David Kinnaman is the author of You Lost Me and president of The Barna Group, which provides research and resources that facilitate spiritual transformation in people's lives. Since joining Barna in 1995, David has designed and analyzed nearly five hundred studies for a variety of churches, nonprofits, and corporations. He and George Barna write a free research report published online at www.barna.org. David and his wife, Jill, have three children and live in Ventura, California.

Gabe Lyons is the author of The Next Christians: The Good News About the End of Christian America and the founder of Q--a learning community that mobilizes Christians to advance the common good in society. Prior to launching Q, Gabe cofounded Catalyst, a national gathering of young leaders. His work represents the perspectives of a new generation of Christians and has been featured by CNN, the New York Times, Fox News, and USA Today. Gabe, his wife, Rebekah, and their three children reside in Manhattan, New York.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 43 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(21)

4 Star

(10)

3 Star

(7)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(4)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 43 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 9, 2011

    UnChristian

    Un-Christian
    The book Unchristian is a book about a Christian author, David Kinnaman, sharing negative perceptions among young people have on Christianity and explores what can be done to reverse them. In the book he tells of stereotypes Christians tend to have. Kinnaman focuses on the stereotypes Christians have on non-christians, and how non-christians view Christians. Kinnaman gives great examples of how Christians are viewed, for example saying that as Christians we feel that non-christians are terrible people and we don't give them a chance. This book conveys difficult truths in a spirit of humility. I feel every Christian should read this because it will influence and challenge their faith. This book shows that not everyone believes in Christ and that Christians will be challenged along their spiritual journeys. Overall this is a great book and shows Christians how to love and accept non-christians.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 4, 2009

    This book was eye-opening. As a Christian, I am interested how Christians are viewed---regardless of denomination. This book is extremely informative.......

    I am saddened, shocked, yet inspired to reach this next generation; the generation raised on cynicism, sarcasm, disbelief and mistrust. After reading "UnChristian", it is clear to see why Christians are viewed as researched in the book. To read this book though, one must remove the initial instinct to become defensive and not say "that's not me." At some point, what is being discussed--is you, even if only in a minor way. My heart has become burdened not only for the next generation, but for Christianity. I know I am not always the best representation of Christ, I am a work in progress.

    I would highly, highly , recommend this book. I have passed it on to the pastor of my church. I think people in the business of spiritual warfare need to know what is going on in today's world and minds. Not compromise the word of God, perhaps a different approach is needed. This book is a good start.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 23, 2009

    UnChristian

    I am a Methodist Pastorial Candidate. My District Superintendent recommended this book. It is excellent information for today's church
    leaders both laity and clergy. With declining numbers in America's young
    church goers this is an insight into why they are not attending church.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 21, 2008

    Practical and Useful for Christians of every ilk.

    From time to time a book will come along and blow your mind away with deep spiritual truths, setting off a series of emotional responses much like those experienced during youth camp in your teen years or a call-to-change type of conference. Perhaps the "drug" wears off over the next few weeks as your spiritual mind and body return to normal, or maybe you¿re able to hold on to the transformation that took place so quickly and powerfully because the book was just that good.<BR/><BR/>unChristian is NOT one of those books.<BR/><BR/>Your imagination will not be captured, your spirit will not soar, and your soul¿s craving will remain unsatiated. What you will find, though, is a challenging, thoughtful, practical look at what a growing number of outsiders (The author¿s term for those outside of the Christian faith) aged 18-30 perceive about our faith, and more importantly, an analysis of our execution of the faith we so strongly profess.<BR/><BR/>The book is chock-full of statistics, highlighted by personal stories and quotes from those surveyed, presented in such a manner that does not bog down nor overwhelm the brain. While the results provide necessary context to the discussion, the real strength of the text is in David¿s ability to show fairness concerning where and how we¿ve failed coupled with a straightforward approach towards change.<BR/><BR/>One of the best features of the book is the quotes from other Christian leaders at the end of each section along with the extended ¿reaction¿ section at the end of the book. Most of these guys and gals I¿ve heard of, but their perspectives gave varying insights apart from Kinnaman¿s and also enabled me to get to know a bit more about other perspective authors I might want to read. I appreciated David¿s willingness to let others from a wide array of backgrounds speak on the issues.<BR/><BR/>Bottom Line: I think it¿s a healthy read for all Christians. For some it will not have a major impact because you¿re already living in such a manner reflective of Christ, for others it will serve as a good reminder and self-check specific areas of your faith, and for many it will challenge you to change (for the good) deep within your faith. But, you may want to have another book to read along side of this one if you're looking for awe-inspiring or entertainment.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 7, 2008

    Interesting observation

    I thought the points of view were very valid, the over zealous reactions of conservatives have branded good religion. I noted Joel Olsteen seems to have moved beyond the over the top religious right and back to faith and good values. If you want an interesting point of view on religion and the perception of the youth read the chapter on religion from a book titled 'Save Generations Y and Z'. That book also had a GREAT driving contract for an up and coming teenage driver. Read it for that if nothing else.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 19, 2013

    Good topic is too long a book

    The content presented here is interesting and relevant to church-going Christians and non-believers alike. That said, it would have been a better read, and certainly more straight-forward, had it been trimmed down, especially if the third-party contributors at the end of each chapter hadn't added so much fluff.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 25, 2012

    Excellent insight for those "out of the loop"!

    Christians telling Christians exactly what those with a negative view of the faith are actually thinking! No more guessing, no more assumptions, and best of all, effective and 'real-world' advice on how to truly connect for those that either can't "see outside of themselves" or can't "get a clue/hint". Being a non-Christian, I have to strongly recommend every Christian with a non-Christian acquaintance read this: you'll know what's keeping them 'away', and they'll know you ACTUALLY understand, instead of you ASSUMING you understand. If I could give this book a higher rating, I most definitely would!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 26, 2012

    Good research. Bad writing.

    Anyone who thinks that homosexuals will take kindly to the soft-spoken bigot will be sorely mistaken. What starts as good research quickly becomes a self-help guide for Christians concerned with (reasonable) outsider criticism. Overall, it's a tolerable read for this outsider--but certainly no more than that.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2011

    Eye-Opening

    unChristian is an eye-opening book that reveals some of the harsh yet real views of Christianity from those who are ¿outsiders¿ to the religion. The authors Kinnaman and Lyons based their writing off of research conducted on people¿s views of what Christian¿s are like. They then took the most popular terms that people associated with Christians and analyzed seven of them in further detail, providing explanations for why people think that and suggestions for Christians on how to change these perceptions. Although this book can be extremely unsettling because of the truth in its content, I still thoroughly enjoyed reading it. As a Christian myself, this was a great tool for me to use in learning how to change my thinking and my behavior so that I am painting the best image for Christ that I can. I was able to see how my good intentions can come off in ways I hadn¿t imagined, and unChristian allowed me to see what better alternatives there are in handling specific conversations dealing with things like homosexuality, so that people will listen. I believe this book is best suited for Christians reading it, but it can also be an interesting read for those who are not Christians as well. It can help those without an understanding of the faith gain insight into how Christians view the world and especially how they deal with what people think of them. This book is also not especially difficult to read, so I would recommend this to any one in high school and older who is looking for a book on Christianity that will really catch them off guard.

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  • Posted August 26, 2011

    Extremely thought-provoking and well-presented...

    This book was an unusual read in that it presents a detailed analysis of the perspectives on today's Christian faith without being opinionated and yet presenting conclusions drawn from empirical research supported by anecdotal references. The information presented here rings true in a "that really explains the differences in viewpoints that I couldn't quite put a finger on" sort of way. Best of all, it provides a Biblical backdrop on how to address and reconcile the differences that exist across generations with a genuine emphasis on a Christlike response. Highly recommended reading for both those inside and outside the Christian faith and in particular those who work with the younger generations...

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  • Posted December 9, 2010

    Amazing!!

    This book was probably one of my favorite books that i have ever read! Its mixture of statistics and examples really helped me to identify with the book. I am a Christian, but i am always striving to be a better person and set a better example for Jesus Christ. How i act is not always how Jesus would act. This book was very eye opening! It helped me to realize some of the ways that i need to better my Christianity! I know now that as a daughter of God i will always need to be learning. Learning new ways to worship him, and also continue to learn how i can teach others about Christs love without pushing them away. This book has a solid foundation and it shows throughout the entire book. If i was to recommend this book to a particular person i would recommend it to other Christians. We are all constantly needing more and more compassion for those who may not be Christian. Otherwise we will not bring anyone to Christs love.

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  • Posted March 15, 2010

    Unchristian

    This was a book to show evangelicals how the rest of the world views them...it was an eye opener, but I felt an accurate one. Our book club's response was almost along generational lines and that is one of the best things about this book...it does challenge your preconceived notions about what our neighbors think of us and what they hear, when we make certain statements. After reading this book, I am much more careful what I say and how I say it!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 7, 2008

    Nothing that I didn't already know!

    unChristian points out the obvious - that Christians are, in my humble opinion, UNCHRISTIAN. So for me, this book just delivers the obvious. What I have observed and experienced: Christians have 'evolved' into a political, right-winged - and yes, I'll say it, 'terroristic' group in my own country. If one purchases this book thinking it will make a difference, don't get your hopes up - just love without condition - the way Christ loved - which was by today's Christianity - UNCHRISTIAN!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 10, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 4, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 27, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 7, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 15, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 30, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 4, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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