Uncle Remus [NOOK Book]

Overview

In 1880, Joel Chandler Harris, a moderate white Southern journalist, published a collection of black folktales, proverbs, songs, and character sketches based on stories he had heard as a child. In his introduction, Robert Hemenway discusses the book's enduring popularity, pointing out that the character of Uncle Remus, the docile and grandfatherly ex-slave storyteller, is a utopian figure-a literary creation by Harris that reassured white readers during the tense and tentative Reconstruction. By contrast, the ...
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Uncle Remus

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Overview

In 1880, Joel Chandler Harris, a moderate white Southern journalist, published a collection of black folktales, proverbs, songs, and character sketches based on stories he had heard as a child. In his introduction, Robert Hemenway discusses the book's enduring popularity, pointing out that the character of Uncle Remus, the docile and grandfatherly ex-slave storyteller, is a utopian figure-a literary creation by Harris that reassured white readers during the tense and tentative Reconstruction. By contrast, the feisty Brer Rabbit was a mainstay of black folklore long before Harris heard of his exploits. Brer Rabbit's cunning and revolutionary antics symbolically inverted the slave-master relationship and satisfied the deep human needs of a captive people.

Presents the legends, songs, and sayings of Uncle Remus, following the text of the first edition of Joel Chandler Harris' attempt to record traditional black stories of his time.

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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940026319589
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 290 KB

Table of Contents

Introduction: Author, Teller, and Hero 7
Suggestions for Further Reading 33
A Note on the Text 35
Uncle Remus: His Songs and His Sayings 37
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3
( 8 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(3)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

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1 Star

(4)

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Sort by: Showing all of 8 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 7, 2010

    Brer Rabbit Review

    If you like children's short stories for all ages because it is not only exciting but brings back childhood memories.Uncle Remus' stories was a group of slave stories collected by Joel Chandler Harris and is a very entertaining book. Uncle Remus' stories are full of adventures with Brer Rabbit and his struggles with Brer Bear and Brer Fox. These short stories have a lot of funny yet good life lessons to be learned from his adventures. Uncle Remus' stories can be enjoyed by any age group because of the exciting and entertaining stories.

    "If you don't let go my behind foots," Squall out Brer Rabbit, "I'm goin' ter butt you wid my head till you ain't got no bref left in your body!" This is a line out of Brer Rabbit an de Tar Baby, One of several stories about the adventures of Brer Rabbit, Brer Bear, and Brer Fox, as told by an old Civil War Slave. These stories have entertained and taught children for many generations. In the words of Uncle Remus, "So Brer Rabbit started right in playin' pranks again, an he ain't never stopped from dat day down ter dis. An ter-day, when folks go strollin' throo de woods, if dey lissen real sharp, dey can hear ole Brer Rabbit prancin' round, pokin' his nose inter some new mischief, chucklin', laughin', an cuttin' up fit ter kill."

    I believe everyone should be introduced to Brer Rabbit. Brer Rabbit is my favorite Character in the Uncle Remus stories. He has a strong will, and is not easily shaken. For example when he is caught by Brer Fox and Brer Bear and they are plotting how to get rid of him, Brer Rabbit thinks quickly and turns the tables on Brer Fox and Brer Bear. No matter what situations he gets into he always gets himself out; which always leaves room for him to get caught again.

    Brer Rabbit is mischievous and always playing pranks on the other critters in the forest. He's always getting himself into trouble with animals bigger than himself. He makes the stories exciting, funny and makes it so I can't wait to see how he is going to get out of the next dilemma he has gotten into. His clever and cunning mind always seems to out wit his predators though they might be bigger and meaner than him.

    Sometimes Brer Rabbit gets to be the hero of the story instead of the one causing all the mischief. In Brer Terrapin's Tug-of-War, all of the critters that lived in Brer Rabbit's neighborhood were all sitting around bragging about who was the smartest or biggest. Brer Rabbit decides they are all too uppity except his friend Brer Terrapin (he's a turtle). He decides to put them all in their place and help his friend show that he is the best at something. In this witty story, Brer Rabbit shows that he doesn't just get into trouble all the time, sometimes he can also be a very loyal and kind friend.

    There are many stories about animals and their adventures, but none have the potential for entertainment like the Uncle Remus stories. One of the main reasons for this is the use of the old slave dialect. It gives the critters in the story some quality character that you can't get from other books. "De skip off throo de woods laughin' an laughin' till it hurt um ter laff, an dey 'fraid der sides wuz goin ter crack open, den dey laff just once more fer good measure." Dat just brings a smile ter de readers face!!!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 17, 2013

    Unreadable

    This copy is totally ruined and unreadable :(

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 10, 2012

    Unreadable

    The digitization is so poor that the book is totally unreadable. What a disappointment!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2011

    Unreadable copy

    A Google digitzed verson, containing many errors

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  • Posted March 28, 2011

    lies about quality

    it is carets and wrong words... unreadable

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 21, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 17, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 4, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

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