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UNCLE SILAS
     

UNCLE SILAS

4.2 5
by J.S. LeFanu
 

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CONTENTS


CHAPTER

I. AUSTIN RUTHYN, OF KNOWL, AND HIS DAUGHTER

II. UNCLE SILAS

III. A NEW FACE

IV. MADAME DE LA ROUGIERRE

V. SIGHTS AND NOISES

VI. A WALK IN THE WOOD

VII. CHURCH SCARSDALE

VIII. THE SMOKER

IX. MONICA KNOLLYS

X. LADY KNOLLYS REMOVES A COVERLET

Overview

CONTENTS


CHAPTER

I. AUSTIN RUTHYN, OF KNOWL, AND HIS DAUGHTER

II. UNCLE SILAS

III. A NEW FACE

IV. MADAME DE LA ROUGIERRE

V. SIGHTS AND NOISES

VI. A WALK IN THE WOOD

VII. CHURCH SCARSDALE

VIII. THE SMOKER

IX. MONICA KNOLLYS

X. LADY KNOLLYS REMOVES A COVERLET


XI. LADY KNOLLYS SEES THE FEATURES

XII. A CURIOUS CONVERSATION

XIII. BEFORE AND AFTER BREAKFAST

XIV. ANGRY WORDS

XV. A WARNING

XVI. DOCTOR BRYERLY LOOKS IN

XVII. AN ADVENTURE

XVIII. A MIDNIGHT VISITOR

XIX. AU REVOIR

XX. AUSTIN RUTHYN SETS OUT ON HIS JOURNEY

XXI. ARRIVALS

XXII. SOMEBODY IN THE ROOM WITH THE COFFIN

XXIII. I TALK WITH DOCTOR BRYERLY

XXIV. THE OPENING OF THE WILL

XXV. I HEAR FROM UNCLE SILAS

XXVI. THE STORY OF UNCLE SILAS

XXVII. MORE ABOUT TOM CHARKE'S SUICIDE

XXVIII. I AM PERSUADED

XXIX. HOW THE AMBASSADOR FARED

XXX. ON THE ROAD

XXXI. BARTRAM-HAUGH

XXXII. UNCLE SILAS

XXXIII. THE WINDMILL WOOD

XXXIV. ZAMIEL

XXXV. WE VISIT A ROOM IN THE SECOND STOREY

XXXVI. AN ARRIVAL AT DEAD OF NIGHT

XXXVII. DOCTOR BRYERLY EMERGES

XXXVIII. A MIDNIGHT DEPARTURE

XXXIX. COUSIN MONICA AND UNCLE SILAS MEET

XL. IN WHICH I MAKE ANOTHER COUSIN'S ACQUAINTANCE

XLI. MY COUSIN DUDLEY

XLII. ELVERSTON AND ITS PEOPLE

XLIII. NEWS AT BARTRAM GATE

XLIV. A FRIEND ARISES

XLV. A CHAPTER-FULL OF LOVERS

XLVI. THE RIVALS

XLVII. DOCTOR BRYERLY REAPPEARS

XLVIII. QUESTION AND ANSWER

XLIX. AN APPARITION

L. MILLY'S FAREWELL

LI. SARAH MATILDA COMES TO LIGHT

LII. THE PICTURE OF A WOLF

LIII. AN ODD PROPOSAL

LIV. IN SEARCH OF MR. CHARKE'S SKELETON

LV. THE FOOT OF HERCULES

LVI. I CONSPIRE

LVII. THE LETTER

LVIII. LADY KNOLLYS' CARRIAGE

LIX. A SUDDEN DEPARTURE

LX. THE JOURNEY

LXI. OUR BED-CHAMBER

LXII. A WELL-KNOWN FACE LOOKS IN

LXIII. SPICED CLARET

LXIV. THE HOUR OF DEATH

LXV. IN THE OAK PARLOUR

CONCLUSION




UNCLE SILAS

A Tale of Bartram-Haugh




CHAPTER I

_AUSTIN RUTHYN, OF KNOWL, AND HIS DAUGHTER_


It was winter--that is, about the second week in November--and great gusts
were rattling at the windows, and wailing and thundering among our tall
trees and ivied chimneys--a very dark night, and a very cheerful fire
blazing, a pleasant mixture of good round coal and spluttering dry wood, in
a genuine old fireplace, in a sombre old room. Black wainscoting glimmered
up to the ceiling, in small ebony panels; a cheerful clump of wax candles
on the tea-table; many old portraits, some grim and pale, others pretty,
and some very graceful and charming, hanging from the walls. Few pictures,
except portraits long and short, were there. On the whole, I think you
would have taken the room for our parlour. It was not like our modern
notion of a drawing-room. It was a long room too, and every way capacious,
but irregularly shaped.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940013379152
Publisher:
SAP
Publication date:
09/15/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
439 KB

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Uncle Silas (Large Print Edition) 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I'm not a big fan of Victorian novels, but I'm a huge fan of Sheridan Le Fanu, one of the foremost writers of ghost stories in the English language. 'Uncle Silas' has been described as a short story unfortunately gotten in a family way, but it was very popular in its day and is now included in World Classics. Unlike the ghost stories, the novel sticks to the more explicable evil of living beings, but is still heavy on the chills. The basic plotline---young, naive heiress is thrust into great danger by the death of her father/protector---is a familiar enough theme, and resonates clearly in any period. To our modern sensibility, she cries too much and takes too much for granted, but it's consistent with the age and circumstance. What makes the novel special is the gradual but inexorable building of fear and foreboding as the story unfolds, punctuated with Le Fanu's uncanny eye and ear for the grotesque detail. In an age when books were often read by candlelight, 'Uncle Silas' must have troubled the nights of many a reader, young or old. The Penguin edition has a comprehensive introduction and is loaded with chapter-by-chapter endnotes, which illuminate a lot of period vernacular and references that might otherwise be missed. Practiced readers of Gothic and Victorian fiction would probably classify 'Uncle Silas' as a 19th-century beach book, but that quality is what makes it particularly approachable for a modern reader.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Uncle Silas is filled with very colorful characters set amongst dreary, but delightfully so, backdrops that, as a fan of Gothic Lit, keeps one entranced
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