×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Uncle Silas
     

Uncle Silas

4.2 5
by J. S. Lefanu
 

See All Formats & Editions

Uncle Silas (1864) is a macabre mystery novel and classic of gothic horror. Joseph Thomas Sheridan Le Fanu (1814 ù1873) was an Irish writer of Gothic tales and mystery novels. He was the premier ghost story writer of the nineteenth century. In his stories the supernatural explanation is implied, but there is always a remote but possible natural explanation.

Overview

Uncle Silas (1864) is a macabre mystery novel and classic of gothic horror. Joseph Thomas Sheridan Le Fanu (1814 ù1873) was an Irish writer of Gothic tales and mystery novels. He was the premier ghost story writer of the nineteenth century. In his stories the supernatural explanation is implied, but there is always a remote but possible natural explanation. Maud Ruthyn, the heroine of this classic Victorian novel, recalls her fear of death, her moody father, the grotesque Madame de la Rougierre, and the suspicions surrounding her Uncle Silas. Uncle Silas is an extended adaptation of his earlier short story "Passage in the Secret History of an Irish Countess", with the locale switched from Ireland to England.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781434489425
Publisher:
Wildside Press
Publication date:
09/23/2007
Pages:
452
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 1.01(d)

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Uncle Silas (Large Print Edition) 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I'm not a big fan of Victorian novels, but I'm a huge fan of Sheridan Le Fanu, one of the foremost writers of ghost stories in the English language. 'Uncle Silas' has been described as a short story unfortunately gotten in a family way, but it was very popular in its day and is now included in World Classics. Unlike the ghost stories, the novel sticks to the more explicable evil of living beings, but is still heavy on the chills. The basic plotline---young, naive heiress is thrust into great danger by the death of her father/protector---is a familiar enough theme, and resonates clearly in any period. To our modern sensibility, she cries too much and takes too much for granted, but it's consistent with the age and circumstance. What makes the novel special is the gradual but inexorable building of fear and foreboding as the story unfolds, punctuated with Le Fanu's uncanny eye and ear for the grotesque detail. In an age when books were often read by candlelight, 'Uncle Silas' must have troubled the nights of many a reader, young or old. The Penguin edition has a comprehensive introduction and is loaded with chapter-by-chapter endnotes, which illuminate a lot of period vernacular and references that might otherwise be missed. Practiced readers of Gothic and Victorian fiction would probably classify 'Uncle Silas' as a 19th-century beach book, but that quality is what makes it particularly approachable for a modern reader.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Uncle Silas is filled with very colorful characters set amongst dreary, but delightfully so, backdrops that, as a fan of Gothic Lit, keeps one entranced
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago