Uncle Tom's Cabin (Oxford 150th Anniversary Edition)

Uncle Tom's Cabin (Oxford 150th Anniversary Edition)

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by Harriet Beecher Stowe
     
 

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There may be no other novel in American history as significant as Uncle Tom's Cabin. A feat of gripping storytelling--the first American work of fiction to become an international bestseller--no other book so effectively expressed the moral case against the "peculiar institution" of slavery.
Oxford University Press is pleased to announce a special…  See more details below

Overview


There may be no other novel in American history as significant as Uncle Tom's Cabin. A feat of gripping storytelling--the first American work of fiction to become an international bestseller--no other book so effectively expressed the moral case against the "peculiar institution" of slavery.
Oxford University Press is pleased to announce a special 150th anniversary edition of this American classic. This volume features a new introduction by Charles Johnson, recipient of a MacArthur Foundation fellowship and winner of the National Book Award for his 1990 novel Middle Passage. Johnson examines Uncle Tom's Cabin with an eye that is at once appreciative and critical, discussing its considerable craft, its impact on its 1852 audience, and its "ineluctably racist" view of African Americans. He describes how Stowe created vibrant and dramatic characters from all levels of Southern society--the mulatto genius George Harris, his light-skinned wife Eliza, the vicious slave trader Dan Haley, the guilt-ridden Augustine St. Clare--hurling them along truly exciting plotlines. She also infused her book with her then-controversial awareness of the humanity of black men and women, giving her audience a sense of the personal reality of the horrors of slavery. But even as sympathetic an author as Stowe, Johnson observes, substituted one kind of racism for another, depicting her black characters with a patronizing condescension.
A classic of American fiction, a pivotal moment in history, and a cultural touchstone, Uncle Tom's Cabin has not lost its relevance or its power. With this insightful new introduction by one of our finest writers, it deserves a place on a bookshelf in every home.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"Shortly after its publication and within Stowe's lifetime, it transcended the category of literature to become that rarest of products: a cultural artifact; a Rosetta stone for black images in American fiction, theater, and film--not so much a novel, one might say, as an experience inseparable from the events that precipitated the Civil War. ('So this,' Abraham Lincoln said, famously, when he met Stowe, 'is the little lady who wrote the book that made this great war.') It has been the Urtext or common coin for discussions about slavery for a century and a half, one woman's very influential interpretation of the Peculiar Institution--an interpretation that we may love or hate, admire or despise, defend or reject, in whole or in part. It is nonetheless a story that so permeates white popular and literary culture, and sits so high astride nineteenth-century American fiction, that it simply can never be ignored." --from the Introduction by Charles Johnson

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780195158168
Publisher:
Oxford University Press, USA
Publication date:
01/28/2002
Series:
Oxford World's Classics Hardcovers Series
Edition description:
150th Anniversary Edition
Pages:
480
Product dimensions:
6.40(w) x 4.50(h) x 1.00(d)

Read an Excerpt

Late in the afternoon of a chilly day in February, two gentlemen were sitting alone
over their wine, in a well-furnished dining parlor, in the town of P—, in Kentucky.
There were no servants present, and the gentlemen, with chairs closely
approaching, seemed to be discussing some subject with great earnestness.

For convenience sake, we have said, hitherto, two gentlemen. One of the parties,
however, when critically examined, did not seem, strictly speaking, to come under
the species. He was a short, thick-set man, with coarse, commonplace features, and
that swaggering air of pretension which marks a low man who is trying to elbow his
way upward in the world. He was much over-dressed, in a gaudy vest of many
colors, a blue neckerchief, bedropped gayly with yellow spots, and arranged with a
flaunting tie, quite in keeping with the general air of the man. His hands, large and
coarse, were plentifully bedecked with rings; and he wore a heavy gold
watch-chain, with a bundle of seals of portentous size, and a great variety of colors,
attached to it,—which, in the ardor of conversation, he was in the habit of
flourishing and jingling with evident satisfaction. His conversation was in free and
easy defiance of Murray's Grammar, and was garnished at convenient intervals with
various profane expressions, which not eventhe desire to be graphic in our account
shall induce us to transcribe.

His companion, Mr. Shelby, had the appearance of a gentleman; and the
arrangements of the house, and the general air of the housekeeping, indicated easy,
and even opulent circumstances. As we before stated, the two were in the midst of
an earnest conversation.

'That is the way I should arrange the matter,' said Mr. Shelby.

'I can't make trade that way—I positively can't, Mr. Shelby,' said the other, holding
up a glass of wine between his eye and the light.

'Why, the fact is, Haley, Tom is an uncommon fellow; he is certainly worth that sum
anywhere—steady, honest, capable, manages my whole farm like a clock.'

'You mean honest, as niggers go,' said Haley, helping himself to a glass of brandy.

'No; I mean, really, Tom is a good, steady, sensible, pious fellow. He got religion at
a camp-meeting, four years ago; and I believe he really did get it. I've trusted him,
since then, with everything I have,—money, house, horses,—and let him come and
go round the country; and I always found him true and square in everything.'

'Some folks don't believe there is pious niggers, Shelby,' said Haley, with a candid
flourish of his hand, 'but I do. I had a fellow, now, in this yer last lot I took to
Orleans—'twas as good as a meetin', now, really, to hear that critter pray; and he was
quite gentle and quiet like. He fetched me a good sum, too, for I bought him cheap
of a man that was 'bliged to sell out; so I realized six hundred on him. Yes, I consider
religion a valeyable thing in a nigger, when it's the genuine article, and no mistake.'

'Well, Tom's got the real article, if ever a fellow had,' rejoined the other. 'Why, last
fall, I let him go to Cincinnati alone, to do business for me, and bring home five
hundred dollars. 'Tom,' says I to him, 'I trust you, because I think you're a
Christian—'I know you wouldn't cheat.' Tom comes back, sure enough; I knew he
would. Some low fellows, they say, said to him—'Tom, why don't you make tracks
for Canada?' 'Ah, master trusted me, and I couldn't'—they told me about it. I am sorry
to part with Tom, I must say. You ought to let him cover the whole balance of the
debt; and you would, Haley, if you had any conscience.'

'Well, I've got just as much conscience as any man in business can afford to
keep,—just a little, you know, to swear by, as 'twere,' said the trader, jocularly; 'and
then, I'm ready to do anything in reason to 'blige friends; but this yer, you see, is a
leetle too hard on a fellow—a leetle too hard.' The trader sighed contemplatively, and

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Meet the Author

Charles Johnson is Pollock Chair in Humanities at the University of Washington. One of the most admired American writers of recent decades, he is the author of four novels (including Middle Passage, which won the National Book Award), numerous short stories, and more than twenty screenplays.

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
June 14, 1811
Date of Death:
July 1, 1896
Place of Birth:
Litchfield, Connecticut
Place of Death:
Hartford, Connecticut
Education:
Homeschooled

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