Uncle Tom's Cabin (Barnes & Noble Signature Editions)

( 397 )

Overview

Kentucky farmer and slave owner Arthur Shelby runs into serious debt and decides to sell two of his slaves: Harry, the young son of his wife’s maid Eliza, and the devout and hard-working Uncle Tom, whose wife and children will remain with Shelby. Eliza overhears Shelby’s plan and flees with her son. Alerted that a slave trader is searching for her, she hastens through the night to the banks of the ice-packed Ohio River. In desperation, she searches for a way to cross the river, find her husband, and escape to ...

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Uncle Tom's Cabin (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)

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Overview

Kentucky farmer and slave owner Arthur Shelby runs into serious debt and decides to sell two of his slaves: Harry, the young son of his wife’s maid Eliza, and the devout and hard-working Uncle Tom, whose wife and children will remain with Shelby. Eliza overhears Shelby’s plan and flees with her son. Alerted that a slave trader is searching for her, she hastens through the night to the banks of the ice-packed Ohio River. In desperation, she searches for a way to cross the river, find her husband, and escape to freedom in Canada—but a gang of relentless slave hunters has other ideas.

     Uncle Tom stays with his family until he is sold to the slave trader and taken onto a riverboat headed south. On the boat he befriends an angelic little white girl named Eva. When Eva falls overboard, Tom dives into the river and saves her. Her grateful father buys Tom from the slave trader and takes him home to New Orleans, where Tom becomes a trusted household servant. Though he lives in relative comfort, unexpected events may doom him to a life of horror and torment.

     When Harriet Beecher Stowe was introduced to Abraham Lincoln in 1862, the president reportedly said, “So this is the little woman who made this great war.”  Apocryphal or not, the words were apt. Uncle Tom’s Cabin was one of the most widely read and influential books of its time. It certainly fueled the abolitionist cause,  and many historians cite it as a major contributing factor in the lead-up to the Civil War.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781435136427
  • Publisher: Barnes & Noble
  • Publication date: 3/19/2012
  • Series: Barnes & Noble Signature Editions
  • Pages: 472
  • Sales rank: 98,126
  • Product dimensions: 5.70 (w) x 8.40 (h) x 1.70 (d)

Meet the Author

Harriet Beecher Stowe

Harriet Beecher Stowe was born in Litchfield, Connecticut, in 1811. The sister of eminent minister Henry Ward Beecher, she spent her young adulthood in Cincinnati, Ohio, where she met her husband Calvin. Both were ardent abolitionists and supported the Underground Railroad, temporarily housing several fugitive slaves in their home. She died in Hartford, Connecticut, in 1896.

Biography

Harriet Beecher Stowe was born on June 14, 1811, in Litchfield, Connecticut, to Lyman Beecher, a Calvinist preacher and activist in the antislavery movement, and Roxana Foote, a deeply religious woman who died when Stowe was four years old. Precocious and independent as a child, Stowe enrolled in the seminary run by her eldest sister, Catharine, where she received a traditionally "male" education. At the age of twenty-one, she moved to Cincinnati to join her father who had become the president of Lane Theological Seminary, and in 1936 she married Calvin Ellis Stowe, a professor at the seminary and an ardent critic of slavery. The Stowes supported the Underground Railroad and housed several fugitive slaves in their home. They eventually moved to Brunswick, Maine, where Calvin taught at Bowdoin College.

In 1850 congress passed the Fugitive Slave Law, prohibiting assistance to fugitives. Stowe was moved to present her objections on paper, and in June 1851 the first installment of Uncle Tom's Cabin a appeared in the antislavery journal National Era. The forty-year-old mother of seven children sparked a national debate and, as Abraham Lincoln is said to have noted, a war.

Uncle Tom's Cabin: Or, Life Among the Lowly met with mixed reviews when it appeared in book form in 1852 but soon became an international bestseller. Some critics dismissed it as abolitionist propaganda, while others hailed it as a masterpiece. The great Russian novelist Leo Tolstoy praised Uncle Tom's Cabin as "flowing from love of God and man." Stowe presented her sources to substantiate her claims in A Key to Uncle Tom's Cabin: Presenting the Original Facts and Documents Upon Which It Is Based, published in 1853. Another antislavery novel, Dred: A Tale of the Great Dismal Swamp, appeared in 1856 but was received with neither the notoriety nor the success of Uncle Tom's Cabin.

Stowe fueled another controversy in The True Story of Lady Byron's Life (1869), in which she accused the poet Lord Byron of having an incestuous love affair with his half sister, Lady Byron. She also took up the topic of domestic culture in works that include The New Housekeeper's Manual (1873), written with her sister Catharine. Stowe died on July 1, 1896, at age eighty-five, in Hartford, Connecticut.

Author biography from the Barnes & Noble Classics edition of Uncle Tom's Cabin.

Good To Know

After its publication in 1852, Uncle Tom's Cabin sold more copies than any other book up to that point, with the exception of the Bible.

When it was becoming a sensation around the world, Uncle Tom's Cabin was smuggled into Russia, in Yiddish to evade the czarist censor.

Between 1853 and 1859, Stowe made several trips to Europe, and forged friendships with fellow writers George Eliot and Elizabeth Barrett Browning.

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    1. Also Known As:
      Christopher Crowfield
    1. Date of Birth:
      June 14, 1811
    2. Place of Birth:
      Litchfield, Connecticut
    1. Date of Death:
      July 1, 1896
    2. Place of Death:
      Hartford, Connecticut

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 397 )
Rating Distribution

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(192)

4 Star

(83)

3 Star

(54)

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(23)

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(45)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 401 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 31, 2007

    Exceedingly insightful!

    I loved this book. I will admit that it wasn't an easy read. But I was determined to finish it anyway. It had so many valuable life lessons that I don't have the space or time to mention them all. I strongly recommend it for christians to read, because we do sometimes forget how to hold on to our faith, when times are bad. I laughed and cried, and I feel so much more enlightened now about faith and love. I hope I'll never forget the teachings in this book.

    29 out of 33 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 13, 2010

    The life of a slave

    Uncle Tom's cabin is a very touching story telling the life of a family of slaves. Uncle Tom is the heart of the story working on Mr. Shelbys farm. He has a wife and a son and he even has is own little cabin that Mr. Shelby has supplied him. Tom was happy there and the tought of escaping never crossed his mind. He believed that God put him there for a reason.
    Writen by Harriet Beecher Stowe, this touching story is unforgettable. The story sets in the south on a slave plantation were the slaves work for their owners and the thought of being sold to a different owner stays with them everyday.
    Not only does this story talk about the story of time but it is filled with charecters from all walks of life ranging from the runnaway slaves tht tells the struggles they go through and all of the heartache they experiance when the two get seperated.
    Not only do the slaves suffer but their family does as well. Tom has a son and for the most of his little life he won't understand why his dad has left.
    For most of Tom's journey through this book he gets traded from owner to owner and finaly gets settled in with an abusive, angered and strict man. Tom still finds away to keep faith and believes that God will light the way. Plus he meets some odd charectors throughout the story like Topsy a daranged and clumsy little slave girl that finds fun in entertaining anyone who will watch.
    I would recomend this book to everyone and anyone because it teaches you the morals of life and that no matter what always keep faith because Tom never lost hope and he found the light in the most dimmest moments because he knew that God was always on his side protecting him
    This book is a must read because it has a lot of historical facts and it gives you a glimpse into the eyes of a different race and what they had to experience.

    26 out of 32 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 10, 2008

    Forgiving and pious to the bitter end

    I am not religious, but I would call Uncle Tom the quintessential Christian, as far I have been taught. He holds on to forgiving others to the bitter end. This is one of the few ¿must read¿ books around. I think it should be mandatory reading for all youths. IMHO anyone who suggests this is anything but a great read either hasn¿t read the book, didn¿t understand the book or simply doesn¿t have a conscience. Brahma

    12 out of 19 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 28, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    A Yearning to Read Review

    Uncle Tom lives in Kentucky under the kind Shelby family, where he has had the life of ease, even as a slave in America. He's treated with respect, both him and his family. He has helped work the Shelby's land for years. Tom loves the Lord, and serves Him all the days of his life. His heart is set on winning others to Jesus and serving the saved and unsaved. He is joyful. He has everything a slave could ask for.

    But Shelby has some debts to settle. Tom, the most valuable slave on the plantation, is sold, and sent with a trader named Haley to be sold. It is the beginning of one of the greatest adventures ever put to paper. It is an adventure of sorrow, broken hearts, and a love that is more redeeming than any human love.


    I was greatly impressed by this book. Before I was finished with it, I read in a curriculum that many writers and publishers were very critical of Stowe's work, that many did (and do) not like it. Even then I wasn't quite sure why, but at the end I was confused. How could anyone dislike this book? Even if the story is too sad for you - how can you not at least see the beauty of the characters and how Stowe formed each sentence? It was all careful, taking one step, one breath at a time. The book was like that. Breathe in, breathe out, breathe in, breathe out. Methodical, like breathing. And what's the beauty of breathing? It keeps you alive without you even knowing it. In a sense, Uncle Tom's Cabin was like that. Every breath was perfect, I didn't even realize it, but it kept the story going in a way that I will never, ever forget.

    There isn't much else to say about this story...other than please, I beg you to read this book. I laughed, I cried my eyes out, I went numb with fear and hatred, I was captivated by the love of God. And Tom, the slave who is now free, will always be a hero.

    9 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 16, 2006

    Simply rivetting!

    I'm horrified and deeply troubled and haunted by the injustices done to poor Uncle Tom. After reading Uncle Tom I am ashamed slavery ever existed in the first place and people could treat others in such a cruel and dehumanzing way. I wont forget this book for as long as I live.

    7 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 15, 2012

    Lots of mistakes

    Yet another free Nook book I'm not able to read.

    5 out of 18 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 6, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    One Book To Be Read Sooner Rather Than Later

    My title says it all. This book should be on everyone's "must read" book list. While the book is not entirely factual, it is founded on events that actually took place. It paints a rather grim picture of the terrible life of slavery in America. It is amazing to me that we allowed this practice to exist, even though I understand why it was condoned.

    5 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 26, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Loved It

    This incredible book opens a window into the seedier side of American slave trade history. Written with compassion and realism Uncle Tom's Cabin exposes the harsh realities of plantation life in the South. Many of the fictional characters and their circumstances were developed by Ms. Stowe from actual individuals.

    I was engrossed in the character development. Simon Legree is arguably the greatest villain ever penned and Uncle Tom is a gentle soul hard to forget. A great classic well worth reading for many reasons. I would highly recommend it.

    4 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 10, 2006

    A Deeply Moving and Realistic Novel

    This book is a very nice read. There is a very large amount of characters and it can be hard to remember who's who. But the main characters show multiple sides of their personality, and this book really shows what a good Christian is. Harriet Beecher Stowe does a wonderful job of showing the cruelties of slavery and the diversity of slave owners, ranging from St. Clare to Simon Legree, and the honesty of slaves such as Uncle Tom. I recommend this book to anyone who wants to learn more about the thoughts about slavery in the 1850's.

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 25, 2005

    One book can change the way you think

    When I started to read this book, I was crying as the characters were seperating. Harriet Beecher Stowe wrote this novel in such a fantastic way that I could actually bond and understand what the characters had to go through. Although most of this book is very sad and depressing, she ties it together with more fortunate events which make the novel seem even more real. I think that Harriet Beecher Stowe is one of the only authors who understands that one novel can not just be only morbid or gleeful, and that if you tie those two feelings together (with some more feelings to one side than another to set the tone), more connection and passion can be felt by the reader. Once you read this fantastic novel, you will be amazed at the real connection you feel with the characters and actual slaves.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 1, 2013

    I Also Recommend:

    I¿ve observed that persons reading this book fall into one of tw

    I’ve observed that persons reading this book fall into one of two categories. The first group consists of individuals having enthusiasm and amazement with a gripping story that vividly describes the horrors of slavery in 19th century America. These folks note that even Abraham Lincoln recognized the importance of this book (based on the apocryphal story of Mr. Lincoln saying to Harriet Stowe words to the effect, ‘So you’re the lady who started this war.’ The book’s historical and social impact can’t be questioned. The other group of readers, which include myself, find the book filled with too many sermons, characters who are like cardboard cut-outs (predictable, one-dimensional), language that is unbelievably stilted and a writing style that can only be characterized as maudlin in the extreme. This group of readers finds the novel to be of great historical importance, but at best tedious to get through. One particularly set of awful chapters describe the death of Little Eva, an angelic little blonde girl who reads the bible, chides her parents for not being more Christian like and describes with anticipation her death after which she’ll be in heaven. Her final request is that locks of her hair be given to her close friends and family, including the slaves. If not for its inclusion in this historically important novel, I would nominate these chapters as entries for competition as the worst literature ever written. It was also hard to believe that, according to the characters in this book, the only persons who could possibly behave in a decent way were God fearing Christians…the rest of them were going to hell. Contrast this with Mark Twain’s writings on slavery which argue that slavery is an intrinsic evil with no need to refer to any religion at all. Remember the scene on a raft in Huckleberry Finn where Huck decides not to write to Jim’s master about helping Jim escape, accepting what the ministers said and concluding “All right, then, I’ll GO to hell” This kind of humanism is entirely missing from “Uncle Tom’s Cabin”. I give this book high marks for its historical importance, but low marks as a piece of good writing. And would direct readers interested in this period of American history to the novels and essays of Mark Twain.

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 8, 2011

    Historical

    The book that inspired the Civil War. A deep and very accurate tale of life as a slave on plantations.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 7, 2013

    Didn't download! DON'T BUY!

    Like my headline says, don't buy this copy. Bought 2 other versions and same thing happened.

    2 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 5, 2012

    Uncle Tom's Cabin

    I think that this book was very eye-opening about racism. A good read.

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 2, 2011

    An Excellent Read!!!

    This was the first classic I ever read aside of those I was forced to read as a child back in middle school. This was a great book!!! Not only does it talk about slavery but also about true Christianity. Very good book to read for those who want to learn more about this dark period and for those who want to learn about Christianity. Many life lessons can be found here. I laughed and cried... Very moving book.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 17, 2005

    This novel was phenomenal

    Uncle Toms Cabin was truly a great book. Harriet Beecher Stowe aws very articulate in this novel. This book showed how African-Americans struggled during the civil war. I reccomend this book to anybody who likes to read. This book was also deeply religous to me. Also this book showed the mentallity of a rascist. Today many colleges read this book. Many people believe that this book was controversial in the south. People are very impressed with this book.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 17, 2013

    A seminal work of the nineteenth-century anti-slavery movement,

    A seminal work of the nineteenth-century anti-slavery movement, Harriet Beecher Stowe’s “Uncle Tom’s Cabin” is also the quintessential sentimental novel. It is both reactionary and political, a call to arms to awaken citizens to the atrocities of the “peculiar institution” of American slavery. By directly addressing the reader in the present tense, Stowe forces the reader to engage in the story and to consider the various characters’ feelings and actions. She also accomplishes this by relying on stereotypes, particularly of the slave characters (Dinah, Mammy, Topsy, Sambo), thereby making them as all-encompassing and as universal as possible while at the same time destroying the myth that they are happily enslaved. Uncle Tom and Eliza are the two main protagonists, and they embody the two plot lines which soon diverge, like the issue of slavery, into north and south, creating a microcosm of the antebellum period of America. Many of the other characters are also forever etched into the literary consciousness, such as Mr. St. Clare, Eva, and Simon Legree.

    One of the most memorable aspects of the novel is Stowe’s anti-slavery proselytizing through a presentation of the most common arguments used in favor of the “peculiar institution” and a more or less all-encompassing view of its many facets, often accomplished through the dialogue of fringe characters. If there is one overarching theme and point that Stowe is trying to emphasize, it is the role of the law in the slavery issue, and the necessity of abrogating that law. A thesis of sorts that is fictional with a factual basis, “Uncle Tom’s Cabin” advocates for a Christian awakening and acknowledgment. As Stowe makes clear, humanity and compassion—fueled by enlightenment—should be the basis for equality. The entirety of the novel and its message is summarized in the last chapter, and it is as prevalent today as it was when it was written. An individual may not be able to accomplish or effect change on his/her own, but when a group of individuals gather together against injustice and allow themselves to be educated and their eyes to be opened to oppression, transformation is possible.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 11, 2013

    Do read.

    A bit difficult in the beginning until I got used to the dialect, but it is truly an educational, endearing and emotional read.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 12, 2013

    Amazing and most touching!

    One of my favorite books ever! No wonder this book was a explosion during the antebellum period in American. To me, the people that Tom went through with were the best parts!

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 12, 2012

    Skull

    Breakdancing chickens!!!

    1 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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