Uncommon Grounds: The History of Coffee and How It Transformed Our World

Uncommon Grounds: The History of Coffee and How It Transformed Our World

4.1 10
by Mark Pendergrast
     
 

ISBN-10: 0465054676

ISBN-13: 9780465054671

Pub. Date: 04/28/2000

Publisher: Basic Books

Uncommon Grounds tells the story of coffee from its discovery on a hill in Abyssinia to its role in intrigue in the American colonies to its rise as a national consumer product in the twentieth century and its rediscovery with the advent of Starbucks at the end of the century. A panoramic epic, Uncommon Grounds uses coffee production, trade,

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Overview

Uncommon Grounds tells the story of coffee from its discovery on a hill in Abyssinia to its role in intrigue in the American colonies to its rise as a national consumer product in the twentieth century and its rediscovery with the advent of Starbucks at the end of the century. A panoramic epic, Uncommon Grounds uses coffee production, trade, and consumption as a window through which to view broad historical themes: the clash and blending of cultures, the rise of marketing and the “national brand,” assembly line mass production, and urbanization. Coffeehouses have provided places to plan revolutions, write poetry, do business, and meet friends. The coffee industry has dominated and molded the economy, politics, and social structure of entire countries.Mark Pendergrast introduces the reader to an eccentric cast of characters, all of them with a passion for the golden bean. Uncommon Grounds is nothing less than a coffee-flavored history of the world.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780465054671
Publisher:
Basic Books
Publication date:
04/28/2000
Pages:
458
Product dimensions:
6.13(w) x 9.25(h) x 1.25(d)
Lexile:
1280L (what's this?)
Age Range:
18 Years

Table of Contents

Prologue: The Oriflama Harvest
Introduction: Puddle Water or Panacea?
Pt. 1Seeds of Conquest
1Coffee Colonizes the World3
2The Coffee Kingdoms21
3The American Drink45
4The Great Coffee Wars of the Gilded Age63
5Hermann Sielcken and Brazilian Valorization77
6The Drug Drink95
Pt. 2Canning the Buzz
7Growing Pains115
8Making the World Safe for Coffee143
9Selling an Image in the Jazz Age155
10Burning Beans, Starving Campesinos179
11Showboating the Depression189
12Cuppa Joe217
Pt. 3Bitter Brews
13Coffee Witch Hunts and Instant Nongratification235
14Robusta Triumphant257
Pt. 4Romancing the Bean
15A Scattered Band of Fanatics291
16The Black Frost317
17The Specialty Revolution337
18The Starbucks Experience367
19Final Grounds389
AppHow to Brew the Perfect Cup427
Notes431
Bibliography461
List of Interviews497
Acknowledgments499
Index503

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Uncommon Grounds: The History of Coffee and How It Transformed Our World 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 10 reviews.
VAmoose More than 1 year ago
I now enjoy my coffee with a higher degree of appreciation for the impact that those beans have had on our world. The book is addictive to those of us who collect factoids for conversational purposes and sheer intellectual entertainment.
havok26 More than 1 year ago
From the discovery of the coffee bean to the beginnings of fair trade, shade grown, organic, bird friendly coffee, this book holds and in-depth look at the growing, trading, exporting, importing, roasting, selling, and brewing of coffee. It's interesting to see who owns each of the big labels in coffee. The book also gives the reader a greater appreciation for where that cup of coffee came from and how it got there.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
Like The Prize by Daniel Yergin and The Emperors of Chocolate by Joel Brenner, Uncommon Grounds is readable history of a large industry. It explains some deep mysteries. Why do one pound coffee cans contain only 13 ounces of coffee? Why is there a brand called Chock Full o' Nuts that has no nuts in it? I found it interesting that Congress always seems to find low coffee prices to be an act of nature while high coffee prices are the result of a conspiracy. After reading the book I bought a 13 ounce pound of ground at the store Eight O'Clock whole bean coffee. I won't go back to canned.