Under My Hat: Tales from the Cauldron

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Overview

Neil Gaiman, Holly Black, Diana Peterfreund, Margo Lanagan, Peter S. Beagle, and Garth Nix are just a few of the authors who have toiled over their cauldrons and conjured up bewitching new creations inspired by and celebrating the might and mystery of the witch. Assembled by one of the most well-regarded anthologists in the science fiction/fantasy world, this rich, intelligent collection will enchant readers of all ages.

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Under My Hat: Tales from the Cauldron

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Overview

Neil Gaiman, Holly Black, Diana Peterfreund, Margo Lanagan, Peter S. Beagle, and Garth Nix are just a few of the authors who have toiled over their cauldrons and conjured up bewitching new creations inspired by and celebrating the might and mystery of the witch. Assembled by one of the most well-regarded anthologists in the science fiction/fantasy world, this rich, intelligent collection will enchant readers of all ages.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

VOYA - Laura Perenic
Under My Hat is a collection of eighteen short stories written expressly by juvenile and young adult authors. All the stories, inspired by magic, are new, an important factor since short story collections often suffer from out-of-date additions that taint the whole book. Authors known for their fantasy writing—like Isobelle Carmody, Neil Gaiman, and Jane Yolen—lend their creative touches to various stories. Despite the different authors, some unique themes appear that are not promising. Often the stories have only one uniquely magical element that carry the plot. A collection that draws inspiration from witches and wizards should include a few more pieces in which the world described is fully steeped in magic, like Garth Nix's "Handful of Ashes." Many of the characters are young children—or read as if they are—when, in fact, they are meant to be young adults. Character development, a struggle for many short story writers, prevents many of the teen protagonists from being properly appreciated as young adults. One of the better written sections is Strahan's "Introduction: Looking Under the Hat," a quick but fascinating history of witches and their pointy hats. A stand-out story that mirrors the book's original premise is "Which Witch" by Patricia McKillip. At more than 400 pages long, Under My Hat is intended for older readers. Unfortunately, the weak stories seem to reinforce that magic is for children and that teens will outgrow a belief in sorcery. Reviewer: Laura Perenic
Kirkus Reviews
Eighteen short tales about witches by some of the wickedest names in fantasy make for a rich anthology. It is inevitable that a collection like this be uneven, but the overall quality is high, even if the stories occasionally suffer from a sameness despite their deeply varied origins. The writers are simply stellar: Ellen Kushner, Frances Hardinge, Charles de Lint, Tanith Lee, Ellen Klages and Holly Black, among others. Neil Gaiman's contribution is a witchy, weird poem. Garth Nix's "A Handful of Ashes" features a library and librarian. Delia Sherman's "The Witch in the Woods" is beautiful and romantic, with deer and bear shape-shifters and no small darkness. Jim Butcher has a Harry Dresden story ("B is for Bigfoot"), and it's terrific. Jane Yolen makes Hans Christian Andersen's life a tale itself, and Patricia McKillip's "Which Witch" makes loud music and crow magic elegantly. The best, however, may be Peter S. Beagle's "Great-Grandmother in the Cellar" (yes, she is, and she goes back there, too, but not the way she came, in this "Sleeping Beauty" variant). Readers will find much to enjoy, especially if taken in smaller bites rather than all at once. (about the authors) (Fantasy anthology. 10 & up)
From the Publisher
Kirkus Reviews, July 1, 2012:
Eighteen short tales about witches by some of the wickedest names in fantasy make for a rich anthology. . . . The writers are simply stellar: Ellen Kushner, Frances Hardinge, Charles de Lint, Tanith Lee, Ellen Klages and Holly Black, among others. Neil Gaiman’s contribution is a witchy, weird poem. Garth Nix’s “A Handful of Ashes” features a library and librarian. Delia Sherman’s “The Witch in the Woods” is beautiful and romantic, with deer and bear shape-shifters and no small darkness. Jim Butcher has a Harry Dresden story (“B is for Bigfoot”), and it’s terrific. Jane Yolen makes Hans Christian Andersen’s life a tale itself, and Patricia McKillip’s “Which Witch” makes loud music and crow magic elegantly. The best, however, may be Peter S. Beagle’s “Great-Grandmother in the Cellar” (yes, she is, and she goes back there, too, but not the way she came, in this "Sleeping Beauty" variant). Readers will find much to enjoy. . . .

Booklist, October 1, 2012:
This 18-story anthology, featuring such notable authors as Garth Nix, Ellen Klager, Margo Lanagan, and Patricia McKillip, offers up an enjoyable witches’ brew of tales. In Charles de Lint’s “Barrio Girls,” two teen fans of vamp fiction find the genre’s glamour diminishes upon meeting a nasty, real-life brujá. Neil Gaiman’s eloquently and evocatively written “Witch Work” explores the power of witchery, emotions, and nature. Jane Yolen’s “Andersen’s Witch” interweaves elements of the iconic author’s life and writings into an inventive meta-tale. These mature, edgy stories feature supernatural elements and also deal with resonating themes, from bullying to self-discovery and self-determination. The mainly young adult protagonists, whether they encounter, become, or already are witches, find their lives transformed--and sometimes transform the lives of others--in diversely magical ways. Editor Strahan’s introduction provides background and context for witches and witch types (and also touches upon the origins of the infamous pointy hat). Lively author biographies are appended.

The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books, October 2012:
Eighteen notable authors brew up some real magic in this enchanting collection of brief tales about the witchy ways of witches. Strahan’s introductory note explains that his inspiration to create such a collection came directly from his fascination with Terry Pratchett’s Discworld, and readers who found a friend in Tiffany Aching will find plenty of kindred spirits here. The tones range from smartly snarky, as in Frances Hardinge’s “Payment Due,” in which a teen witch uses her powers to harass the repo man, to sweetly romantic, as in Delia Sherman’s “The Witch in the Woods” in which a shape-shifting healer must fight for her love’s life. Neil Gaiman casts a spell with a possibly funny, possibly melancholy, but definitely odd poem, while Holly Black, Tanith Lee, and Charles de Lint play on themes of expectations and reality. A few stories are a little overtidily concluded, but several close on an enticingly open note: the final scene of Ellen Klages’ “The Education of a Witch,” involving a vindictive preschooler, is especially haunting. So grab your hat, your wart, and don’t forget the eye of newt—you’ll want to spend the witching hour and more with this coven.

School Library Journal, November 2012:
This collection of short stories has one common theme: witches. Good, evil, male, female, old, and young–these magical beings and tales of their exploits are all included. The anthology starts and ends with the best of the bunch, kicking off with Diane Peterfreund’s “Stray Magic,” which tells of a stray dog rescued by a shelter worker that begins to communicate with her and pleads for help finding her master (a wizard to whom the Labrador is the “familiar”). The final story is Margo Lanagan’s “Crow and Caper, Caper and Crow,” another gem detailing Pen, an aging witch, embarking on a journey across the sea to bless her brand-new baby granddaughter–but the clever witch is in for a surprise when she lays eyes on the new addition. Peter S. Beagle’s “Great-Grandmother in the Cellar” assaults readers much like the protagonist’s great-grandmother claws her way out of the dirt in the wine cellar where her bones have been buried for years. Yet, great-grandmother is the good witch in this spooky tale. Another standout is Ellen Klages’s “The Education of a Witch,” about a young girl’s growing fascination with witches. It includes the most memorable scene in the book. As supernatural-themed stories are extremely popular and good short-story collections are hard to find, this one is an excellent addition. Though a few of the selections are wordy and not particularly compelling, the great ones more than make up for them.

Children's Literature:
Fantasy lovers will enjoy the great stories by authors they are familiar with but also some new ones to add to their reading lists.

From the Hardcover edition.

Children's Literature - Kasey Giard
It all begins with a hat, more particularly with what is beneath the hat. This collection of stories about witches ranges from tales featuring the more traditional type of female spell-caster to mysterious traveling men with unusual powers. Witches star as heroes, as the new grandmother who journeys to bless her new child or the woman who must take back the gemstone from a demon. But these masters of sorcery are not always so benevolent. They may trick a young poet into a terrible bargain as in the story of the Ice Witch with the terrible frozen castle, or murder innocent men as in the story of the desert vampire witch. One story features a witch rock band. Another weaves a tale about the life of Hans Christian Andersen. Each writer proves his or her merit with the creativity and power of each of the stories in this collection. Fantasy lovers will enjoy the great stories by authors they are familiar with but also some new ones to add to their reading lists. Recommended. Reviewer: Kasey Giard
School Library Journal
Gr 9 Up—This collection of short stories has one common theme: witches. Good, evil, male, female, old, and young-these magical beings and tales of their exploits are all included. The anthology starts and ends with the best of the bunch, kicking off with Diane Peterfreund's "Stray Magic," which tells of a stray dog rescued by a shelter worker that begins to communicate with her and pleads for help finding her master (a wizard to whom the Labrador is the "familiar"). The final story is Margo Lanagan's "Crow and Caper, Caper and Crow," another gem detailing Pen, an aging witch, embarking on a journey across the sea to bless her brand-new baby granddaughter-but the clever witch is in for a surprise when she lays eyes on the new addition. Peter S. Beagle's "Great-Grandmother in the Cellar" assaults readers much like the protagonist's great-grandmother claws her way out of the dirt in the wine cellar where her bones have been buried for years. Yet, great-grandmother is the good witch in this spooky tale. Another standout is Ellen Klages's "The Education of a Witch," about a young girl's growing fascination with witches. It includes the most memorable scene in the book. As supernatural-themed stories are extremely popular and good short-story collections are hard to find, this one is an excellent addition. Though a few of the selections are wordy and not particularly compelling, the great ones more than make up for them.Tara Kehoe, Plainsboro Public Library, NJ
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780375868306
  • Publisher: Random House Children's Books
  • Publication date: 8/28/2012
  • Pages: 432
  • Age range: 12 - 17 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.60 (h) x 1.40 (d)

Meet the Author

JONATHAN STRAHAN is the editor of more than 40 books, including the Locus and Aurealis award-winning anthologies The Starry Rift, Life on Mars, The New Space Opera (Vols. 1 & 2), the bestselling The Locus Awards (with Charles N. Brown), and the Eclipse and the Best Science Fiction and Fantasy of the Year anthology series. He won the World Fantasy Award for his editing in 2010, and has been nominated for the Hugo Award for his editing four times. He has also won the Aurealis Award three times, the Ditmar Award six times, and is a recipient of the William Atheling Award for his criticism amd review. He has been Reviews Editor for Locus: The Magazine of the Science Fiction And Fantasy Fields since 2002.

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Posted September 18, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    For anyone who is a lover of the world of witchcraft, and admire

    For anyone who is a lover of the world of witchcraft, and admires those little darlings who wear the black, pointed hats and have that feline as their familiar - these are the tales for you! A ton of beloved novelists from the fantasy realm have come together, each offering their own story about the witch-‘y’ women we have come to love.


    As we all know, just like the dove is the symbol for peace and the red, white and blue is all about America, the witch has her own symbols. But what is most interesting is that these authors have shown that the females of sorcery can be found anywhere and everywhere in the world with this collection of tales that entice and intrigue.

    Beginning with Stray Magic, which offers a look at a no-kill shelter that’s saving ‘familiars;’ to a bailiff looking for revenge; to bff’s who live in a frightening trailer park, discover magic, and must be protected by Uncle Crusher; to a girl who was a cat; a girl who’s mom was a witch; to a tale by Garth Nix, called, In a Handful of Ashes that has readers following a girl named Mari who’s growing up in the servant’s quarters waiting on the very snooty schoolgirls who should never test the lines of magic - every adventure is covered. Authors like Tim Pratt, Ellen Kushner, Jim Butcher and more are the fantastic brains behind these unforgettable stories. There is even a poem included written by Neil Gaiman that is awesome.

    Just in time for Halloween, readers receive everything from the dark to the comedic with a splash of horror thrown in for good measure. You’ll love these stories!

    Quill Says: An entertaining homage to the ladies in the black pointy hats!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 22, 2013

    Only get these for the Dresden story

    Jim Butcher's story was great. Pretty much the only reason I get these. However, every once in awhile I find a new author I like. Kat Richardson and Simon R. Green I found both of them in Mean Streets. Since then I have read all of their books.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 27, 2012

    Hey

    Sorry guys. It is Erin from the other review. I forgot to add in that I really love reading.

    Erin

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 1, 2012

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    Posted September 8, 2012

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