Under Pressure: Cooking Sous Vide
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Under Pressure: Cooking Sous Vide

3.2 25
by Thomas Keller
     
 


A revolution in cooking

Sous vide is the culinary innovation that has everyone in the food world talking. In this revolutionary new cookbook, Thomas Keller, America's most respected chef, explains why this foolproof technique, which involves cooking at precise temperatures below simmering, yields results that other culinary methods cannot. For the first time,

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Overview


A revolution in cooking

Sous vide is the culinary innovation that has everyone in the food world talking. In this revolutionary new cookbook, Thomas Keller, America's most respected chef, explains why this foolproof technique, which involves cooking at precise temperatures below simmering, yields results that other culinary methods cannot. For the first time, one can achieve short ribs that are meltingly tender even when cooked medium rare. Fish, which has a small window of doneness, is easier to finesse, and shellfish stays succulent no matter how long it's been on the stove. Fruit and vegetables benefit, too, retaining color and flavor while undergoing remarkable transformations in texture.

The secret to sous vide is in discovering the precise amount of heat required to achieve the most sublime results. Through years of trial and error, Keller and his chefs de cuisine have blazed the trail to perfection—and they show the way in this collection of never-before-published recipes from his landmark restaurants—The French Laundry in Napa Valley and per se in New York. With an introduction by the eminent food-science writer Harold McGee, and artful photography by Deborah Jones, who photographed Keller's best-selling The French Laundry Cookbook, this book will be a must for every culinary professional and anyone who wants to up the ante and experience food at the highest level.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

The origins of sous vide cooking, or vacuum-packing foods and cooking them at precise, relatively low temperatures for long periods, may have been largely in frozen convenience foods, but it has become standard in top kitchens worldwide, notably Keller's own. Now, Keller aims to demonstrate the technique to a wider swath of cooks-not the masses, but at least those who can afford this lavish volume and the sous vide equipment. One need not cook the exact recipes (which are unaltered from the restaurant's) to be inspired by Keller's careful yet whimsical creations, such as a cuttlefish "tagliatelle" with palm hearts and nectarine or squab with piquillo peppers, marcona almonds, fennel and date sauce. And Keller, with several of his chefs as well as "curious cook" Harold McGee, takes pains in the introduction to explain sous vide fundamentals, arguing persuasively that it is not a fad but an important technique that allows unparalleled control over how ingredients are heated and what flavors and textures result. Still, at least until the equipment is more affordable, most readers will admire this gorgeous book on their coffee tables, from the simple beauty of photos of ingredients in their natural states to plates with a course's elements so artfully arranged they would not be out of place in a modern art museum. (Dec.)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781579653514
Publisher:
Artisan
Publication date:
11/17/2008
Pages:
295
Sales rank:
41,341
Product dimensions:
11.30(w) x 11.10(h) x 1.30(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Thomas Keller, author of The French Laundry CookbookBouchonUnder Pressure, Ad Hoc at Home, and Bouchon Bakery, has thirteen restaurants and bakeries in the United States. He is the first and only American chef to have two Michelin Guide three-star-rated restaurants, The French Laundry and per se, both of which continue to rank among the best restaurants in America and the world. In 2011 he was designated a Chevalier of The French Legion of Honor, the first American male chef to be so honored. 

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Under Pressure: Cooking Sous Vide 3.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 25 reviews.
StewartWaltzer More than 1 year ago
If you have never cooked Sous Vide, it will change your life. Keller's book is a semi professional introduction. It teaches the precision necessary to be consistent at inordinately high levels.
You can try Sous Vide by dropping your product into a plastic bag and pushing into cold water to squeeze out 95% of the air and ziplocking it at the last moment. Set a large pot of water half off the burner and with a candy thermometer you have made a make shift immersion circulator. You can sample the incredible richness of food cooked at lower temperatures where the proteins and enzymes and consequent flavors have not been trashed. As Harold McGee puts it, the organoleptic properties of food are preserved.
You can also buy a simple vacuum bagger at Doug Care for $200 and an immersion circulator on E bay for $250. As you perfect your understanding you cannot imagine the change it will make in how you prepare and think about food. It is a revolution of flavor and thought that supersedes the Escoffier mentality of French food.

Keller's temperatures are a little high to my mind but this book is really worth it. I read it every day. Joan Roca wrote the first book on Sous VIdea few years ago, but Keller's book is more nuanced, accessible and evolved. Roaca is a great chef, very gifted. Harold McGee's book is essential to understand what you are doing in terms of shifting collagen into gelatin through long cooking periods. In sous vide there are 16 recipes on how to boil and egg from Joel Robuchon to Herve This. Keller is very smart and if you are interested in the future of food, it is important to read this.
DNchicago More than 1 year ago
In its pure form, the book far exceeds the needs, interests and reach of the casual "sous vide" cook. Honestly, it seems written for the professional chef working in a professional kitchen -- with a dedicated team of experienced sous-chefs. Actually, the photos in the book underscore this fact! Why did I purchase the book? Simply, I want to extract techniques and ideas, scale them down to the home kitchen, and apply them to existing recipes or gain inspiration for new ventures -- all using ingredients and foodstuffs of general interest and appeal. With that goal and application in mind, the book serves its purpose well...
DIANE-FROM-OHIO More than 1 year ago
I received this book and my sous vide appliance just yesterday for Christmas, so I have not had a chance to use it. But I have been interested in sous vide for about a year. If you are using a Thomas Keller book it's difficult to go wrong. I notice the comments with a low rating are from a few years ago. I think it was before sous vide was readily available and well known. I expect this book to be used and enjoyed. The book itself is beautiful and detailed. I see many delicious meals in our future using these recipes. By coincidence I received a copy of Tyler Florence's new book &quot;In The Test Kitchen&quot; yesterday and was surprised to see a sous vide recipe for meatballs in it. They made two batches of identical meatballs and sauce and braised one and sous vide one -- the sous vide was superior in texture and flavor. Interesting. So this is one band wagon I am looking forward to joining.
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CookingWiz More than 1 year ago
Interesting to know, but not practical for the home cook. There are easier methods to obtain the same flavors.