Under the Net

Under the Net

4.4 5
by Iris Murdoch
     
 

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Introduction by Kiernan Ryan

Iris Murdoch's first novel is a gem – set in a part of London where struggling writers rub shoulders with successful bookies, and film starlets with frantic philosophers. Its hero, Jake Donaghue, is a likable young man who makes a
living out of translation work and sponging off his friends. A meeting with Anna, an old

Overview

Introduction by Kiernan Ryan

Iris Murdoch's first novel is a gem – set in a part of London where struggling writers rub shoulders with successful bookies, and film starlets with frantic philosophers. Its hero, Jake Donaghue, is a likable young man who makes a
living out of translation work and sponging off his friends. A meeting with Anna, an old flame, leads him into a series of fantastic adventures.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“Iris Murdoch has imposed her alternative world on us as surely as Christopher Columbus or Graham Greene.” — Sunday Times

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780670739325
Publisher:
Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
Publication date:
01/28/1954
Product dimensions:
20.00(w) x 20.00(h) x 20.00(d)

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Kinglsey Amis
A winner...she is a distinguished novelist of a rare kind.

Meet the Author

Iris Murdoch was born in Dublin in 1919 of Anglo-Irish parents, grew up in London and was educated at Oxford and Cambridge. She is the author of 26 novels and several works of philosophy. She died in 1999.

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Under the Net 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I finished Under the Net this evening. I don't know if, after all the descriptions of alcohol abuse, this novel was worth my time or temptations to drink. No alcoholic should read this book because of possible triggers. I heard in an ethics lecture that Murdoch was a Christian, but there is little evidence that she believed in divine intervention or even the providential order of things, the baptism scene in the Thames notwithstanding. All three of her novels that I've read are a confusion of random, erratic plot twists with Christian allegory. I don't get it; how are these two elements supposed to be coordinated? In defense of the novel, there were scenes and dialogue that had me in stitches at times, especially the dognapping episode. All in all, I think three stars are enough.
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