Underboss

( 26 )

Overview

In March of 1992, the highest-ranking member of the Mafia in America ever to break his oath of silence testified against his boss, John Gotti. He is Salvatore ("Sammy the Bull") Gravano, second-in-command of the Gambino crime family, the most powerful in the nation. Because of Gotti's uncanny ability to escape conviction in state and federal trials despite charges that he was the Mafia's top chieftain, the media had dubbed him the "Teflon Don." With Sammy the Bull, this would ...
See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (120) from $1.99   
  • New (6) from $4.33   
  • Used (114) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing 1 – 5 of 6
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$4.33
Seller since 2009

Feedback rating:

(196)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Mass market paperback in new condition

Ships from: Dilworth, MN

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$4.38
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(86)

Condition: New
Ships same day. Very slight shelf wear.Tracking included.

Ships from: Hastings, MI

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$5.61
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(86)

Condition: New
Tracking included. Very slight shelf wear.Ships same day.

Ships from: Hastings, MI

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$6.95
Seller since 2010

Feedback rating:

(72)

Condition: New
Softcover NEW! ! -TIGHT CRISP CLEAN UNREAD COPY! ! NO CREASES! ! NO MARKS! ! 1997 Mm printing 10-1 number line-PAGES ARE SLIGHTLY OFF WHITE-FROM SELLER WITH OVER A DECADE OF ... EXPERIENCE SELLING ON-LINE. Read more Show Less

Ships from: Fontana, CA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$45.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(151)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing 1 – 5 of 6
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

In March of 1992, the highest-ranking member of the Mafia in America ever to break his oath of silence testified against his boss, John Gotti. He is Salvatore ("Sammy the Bull") Gravano, second-in-command of the Gambino crime family, the most powerful in the nation. Because of Gotti's uncanny ability to escape conviction in state and federal trials despite charges that he was the Mafia's top chieftain, the media had dubbed him the "Teflon Don." With Sammy the Bull, this would all change.

Today Gotti is serving life in prison without parole. And as a direct consequence of Gravano's testimony, the Cosa Nostra — the Mafia's true name — is in shambles.

Peter Maas is the author of the international bestseller The Valachi Papers , which Rudolph Giuliani, then a federal prosecutor and now the mayor of New York City, hailed as "the most important book ever written about the Mafia in America."

In Underboss, based on dozens of hours of interviews with Gravano, we are ushered as never before into the most secret inner sanctums of Cosa Nostra — and an underworld of power, lust, greed, betrayal, deception and sometimes even honor, with the specter of violent death always poised in the wings. It is a real world we have often read and heard about from the outside; now we are able to experience it in rich, no-holds-barred detail as if we were there ourselves.

Unlike his glamorous boss John Gotti, Sammy the Bull honored Costra Nostra's ancient traditions, hugging the shadows, avoiding the limelight and staying far from the flashbulbs and reporters. But he was present at such key events of the modern Costra Nostra as thesensational slaying of mob boss Paul Castellano, Gotti's predecessor, outside a Manhattan steakhouse.

Compulsively readable, Gravano's revelations are of enormous historical significance. "There has never been a defendant of his stature in organized crime," the federal judge in the Gotti trial declared, "who has made the leap he has made from one social planet to another."

Gravano's is a story about starting out on the street, about killing and being killed, revealing the truth behind a quarter century of shocking headlines. It is also a tragic story of a wasted life, unalterable choices and the web of lies, weakness and treachery that underlies the so-called "Honored Society."

Author Biography: Peter Maas's is the author of the number one New York Times bestseller Underboss. His other notable bestsellers include The Valachi Papers, Serpico, Manhunt, and In a Child's Name. He lives in New York City.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Albert Mobilio
Like the apologias of political apostates -- or, from an earlier time, the conversion testimonials of saints -- the enduringly popular Mafia confessional serves its own era by recounting in lush detail how, by scaling a great heap of sin, the sinner can reach salvation. A morally bracing and redemptive tale, it reassuringly allows us to pit our trifling wrongs against downright evil and thus to shine by comparison. So when Sammy "The Bull" Gravano, the former underboss of the Gambino crime family and admitted murderer of 19 fellow miscreants, spills his naughty beans, we are all ears; witness the tabloid headlines surrounding this book's publication, its rapid shot to the top of the bestseller lists and the juicy ratings for a two-night network TV author interview. Gravano may not be a St. Augustine or a Whittaker Chambers, but this jail-house songbird is whistling from behind bars like a virtuoso.

A Brooklyn schoolyard bully who was drawn to the power of neighborhood Mafiosi, Gravano matured into a first-rate thug, albeit one with considerable strategic acumen. By the mid-'70s, he had become a "made man." To get in you have to "make your bones," that is, carry out a contract killing. In effortlessly hard-boiled prose, Gravano recalls shooting a friend (typical in the Mafia because friends and family have ease of access) in the back of the head during a car ride after a night of partying: "As that Beatles song played, I became a killer. Joe Colucci was going to die ... I could almost feel the bullet leaving the gun and entering his skull. It was strange. I didn't hear the first shot. I didn't seem to see any blood. His head didn't seem to move."

Having inhaled the heady, operatic atmosphere of The Godfather, Gravano possessed an altar boy's hallowed regard for the Sicilian code of honor and silence (omerta). But this was one altar boy you didn't cross -- when a flashy Czech drug dealer showed disrespect, Sammy had his eyes shot out. A gangster's gangster, Gravano was also a skilled racketeer who eventually controlled much of the drywall construction and concrete pouring business in New York. When he allied himself with a truculent, charismatic capo from Queens named John Gotti to eliminate their capo di tutti capi, Paul Castellano, the two formed a potent combination of business and street smarts. Staged in midtown Manhattan at the dinner hour, the Castellano murder instantly became one of the most notorious mob hits in history. Along with the power it brought them, it also subjected both men to a high degree of media and law enforcement attention, ensuring, in tragic fashion, their downfall. The garrulous, flamboyant Gotti loved the spotlight; Gravano didn't. (The FBI taped Gravano for over 4,500 hours in his private office and didn't get evidence enough for a parking ticket; they taped Gotti for six hours in an apartment above his social club and he gave away the entire show, including implicating Sammy in two murders.)

Betrayed by Gotti, Gravano decided to come in from the cold. He cut a shrewd deal with federal prosecutors and walked out of prison after just eight years. Now with amanuensis Peter Maas, who also shepherded the confessions of the original Mafia turncoat, Joe Valachi, into print, Gravano tells a true-crime tale packed with the shiver of authenticity. Among the growing crop of Mafia self-marketers, he's the rare one with irony as well as a storyteller's knack. Of course, the yarn is familiar -- he once was lost but now he's found -- but Gravano brings fresh blood to its spinning. -- Salon

Time
Fascinating for its anthropologically detailed portrait of a subculture some of us can't get enough of.
New York Times Book Review
Brilliantly constructed and grimly fascinating...The result is a terrific and important book...It's important because it is a morality play on the subject of loyalty. To whom are you loyal, and from who should you be able to expect loyalty?
People
An absorbing, intimate, alluring tale of power, greed, and Mob intrigue.
Detroit Press
A riveting job of detailing real Mafia life...It's quick, exciting reading and Maas deserves full marks for generally keeping the sharks of the mob from looking like dolphins. There's no chrome in the jalopy of Gravano's life.
New York
Breathtaking...Supremely stylish.
Donald E. Westlake
Terrific...an important book...a gripping story. It's important because it is a morality play on the subject of loyalty. —New York Times Book
New York Magazine
Breathtaking...Supremely stylish.
People Magazine
An absorbing, intimate, alluring tale of power, greed, and Mob intrigue.
Detroit Free Press
A riveting job of detailing real Mafia life...It's quick, exciting reading and Maas deserves full marks for generally keeping the sharks of the mob from looking like dolphins. There's no chrome in the jalopy of Gravano's life.
New York Magazine
Breathtaking...Supremely stylish.
NY Times Book Review
Brilliantly constructed and grimly fascinating...The result is a terrific and important book...It's important because it is a morality play on the subject of loyalty. To whom are you loyal, and from who should you be able to expect loyalty?
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780061096648
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 1/28/1900
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Edition description: Reissue
  • Pages: 512
  • Product dimensions: 4.18 (w) x 6.75 (h) x 1.02 (d)

Meet the Author

Peter Maas's is the author of the number one New York Times bestseller Underboss. His other notable bestsellers include The Valachi Papers, Serpico, Manhunt, and In a Child's Name. He lives in New York City.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Chapter One
They're bad people, but they're our bad people.

"Yeah, you could say i came from a pretty tough neighborhood," Salvatore (Sammy the Bull) Gravano said.
The neighborhood was Bensonhurst, roughly two miles square, in southwestern Brooklyn bordering Gravesend Bay and the Atlantic Ocean.
Unlike the first Italian communities in New York, such as Manhattan's Little Italy, which was being swallowed up by an aggressively expanding Chinatown, or East Harlem, clinging to a narrow strip along the East River against the inroads of a booming Hispanic population, Bensonhurst remained vibrantly and definitively Italian-American. Even today it is where recent arrivals from southern Italy and Sicily settle. In Roman Catholic churches, some masses are sung in Italian.
As with other ethnic migrations in the city, the subway paved the way when in the early 1900s the first rapid transit lines linking Brooklyn to Manhattan went into service, one of them going directly from the dark and crowded tenements of Little Italy to the open spaces of Bensonhurst.
It has a small-town feel. Many of the cross streets lack traffic lights. Cruising taxis, common in most of the city, are rare. Houses are mostly two-family dwellings of aluminum siding, stucco or brick with wrought-iron gates painted white and porches with their ubiquitous steel awnings. Tiny front lawns feature potted flowers and statues of the Virgin Mary and in backyards, more often than not, are vegetable gardens. Bensonhurst's main street, 18th Avenue, also officially designated Cristoforo Colombo Boulevard, is lined with Italian delicatessens, bakeries, fresh mozzarella shops, food marketsoverflowing with packaged products imported from Italy, pizza parlors boasting traditional wood-burning ovens and espresso bars.
In Bensonhurst, everyone knows everyone else on every block. Its mainly blue-collar residents are insular, closemouthed and suspicious of outsiders. Strangers are remarked on at once. As a result, the rate of common street crimes--rapes, robberies, felony assaults--is low compared to other parts of the city, according to police statistics. Murder is a third less than the citywide average.
But Bensonhurst was tough in a very special sense. A great number of these murders were mob related. It was a prime spawning ground for Cosa Nostra--"Our Thing"--which filled its ranks from local youth street gangs that hung out at candy stores and luncheonettes throughout the area. One of the original members of Cosa Nostra's national commission, Joseph Profaci, the so-called Olive Oil King because of his monopoly on the importation of olive oil from Italy, lived in Bensonhurst. So did his successor as a family boss, Joseph Colombo. One of the grandest underworld funerals ever seen in New York, complete with thirty-eight carloads of flowers, took place in Bensonhurst following the Prohibition-era slaying of a celebrated mobster named Frankie Yale, who had a falling out with Al Capone.
As in a Sicilian village, Cosa Nostra's shadow loomed large over Bensonhurst and was spoken of only in whispers. "They just shoot themselves," a resident confided after two corpses were found in a car, gazing vacantly into space, each with a bullet hole behind the ear. "The thing is, you mind your own business. You don't hear nothing. You don't see nothing." Another said, "You got to admit the Mafia, whatever, keeps the neighborhood safe. You don't see all them other people coming in to mug and burglarize here. So their presence is kind of good is my opinion."

Salvatore Gravano was born in Bensonhurst on March 12, 1945. He had two older sisters. Another sister and a brother had died before his arrival. His mother, Caterina, was born in Sicily and brought to America as a baby. His father, Giorlando, also from Sicily, was on the crew of a freighter when he jumped ship in Canada and slipped into the United States as an illegal alien.
For Sammy and for friends and neighbors, his parents were always Kay and Gerry. English was the language of the house, except during visits from his grandmothers, who spoke a Sicilian dialect. Sammy was especially close to his maternal grandmother and picked up enough to be able to converse with her, but forgot it all after she died.
He was called Sammy instead of Salvatore or Sal for as long as he can remember. Someone had said that he looked just like Uncle Sammy, a brother of his mother's, and the name stuck. The uncle was Big Sammy and he was Little Sammy. He grew up on 78th Street in the heart of Bensonhurst near 18th Avenue. His father owned the house, the middle one of three identical brick row houses, each with a garage. Steps led up to the front porch. The basement apartment was rented out, as well as an apartment on the second floor. The Gravanos lived in the middle apartment. In a small plot behind the house, Sammy's father cultivated tomatoes and beans and tended to his prized fig tree.
Kay was an exceptionally skilled seamstress who worked for a Jewish dress manufacturer in Manhattan's garment center. Gerry was a house painter until he was felled by lead poisoning and could no longer continue his trade. The dress manufacturer then financed the Gravanos in a satellite factory of their own in Bensonhurst. Kay supervised the filling of the orders he sent her and rode the subway to the garment center to sew the sample dress for a forthcoming line, while Sammy's father took care of the business end. Things went so well that Gerry was able to afford the purchase of a summer cottage for $8,000 near Lake Ronkonkoma in the middle of Long Island.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 26 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(17)

4 Star

(7)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 26 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 25, 2004

    A True Man's Man

    By all means of admiration, Sammy was true Cosa Nostre and a bull alright. He paid exceptional attention to detail and didn't miss a thing. This author takes you inside Sammy's life as if you were right beside him. This book is well written and delivered.Sammy was very street wise and thus a survivor. Never a show off, always to himself, and a smart business man.He was a loyal person to anyone who would return his honor, and for those who betrayed him, he did what he did out of respect for himself, a real man's man. He's even book smart, look who he chose to write his biography! Hope this review finds him well.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 28, 2013

    Gotti was a coward!!!! "The Bull" ran the show, and ha

    Gotti was a coward!!!!
    "The Bull" ran the show, and had the balls that Gotti lacked! And when things got a little too tight for Gotti, he snitched like the rat he is! Nothing but respect for Mr. Gravano!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 2, 2012

    Totally amazing. Very well written and in very good detail. I ca

    Totally amazing. Very well written and in very good detail. I cant put this book down!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 7, 2012

    highly recommended

    This book was incredible!! I felt like I was in a movie theatre watching a blockbuster movie.. Very graphic literally.. great job..Sammy and Peter..

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 7, 2011

    I Also Recommend:

    Good book, not glorifying the story!

    A book that keeps you interested at all times, not boring, and a great story overall. Since it's a true story, it gives you insight into 'that' life. Personally, we all know it's an evil life and wish it was fictional but overall it's still a great book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 11, 2009

    Hierarchichal Pecking Order Obtains Within Organized Crime

    This work is a deft exemplar of the consequences of a rift in the chain of command, even within the milieu of criminal enterprises. The underboss chooses to challenge and effect a coup within his organization and the residual results are that the entire structure topples: illustrative of the fact that the worst transgression that a person can commit, even superseding homicide, is the tactical assault on the hierarchical pecking order within organized crime. Throughout this book, the writing is riveting and forces the reader to turn pages feverishly. It was a shame when the book came to an end, because the reader is left craving more about the inside workings of criminality. But even more than that, this book explores in very human terms the inner torments, feelings, and pressurized thought processes of the central character, Sammy "the Bull" Gravano. This book is far, far better than the documentary televised on PBS concerning this same subject matter. The reason that this book surpasses the documentary is that it humanizes the central focus of this study in terms that we, the readers, can all be empathetic with: "I wanted my son to be legitimate, to have nothing to do with what I did." (Chapter 18). For insight that is unique with respect to both Sammy "the Bull" Gravano and John Gotti, Underboss by Peter Maas is unsurpassed.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 22, 2006

    A Rat in his own right

    Although the book was very fasciating and he has a certain charisma about him, I Find it hard to forget that he is a dirty rat. How do you dare pledge your life to something and years later rat out the people who you took an oath to live and die by.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 26, 2005

    Compassion to THE BULL

    This book was so captivating. It teaches you so much of what Mafia life was like, before the fall of Gotti. ANyone who wants to learn about the mafia history or just interested crime. This is the book for you :)

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 7, 2004

    Good story about a bad man!!

    This is a fascinating look into the man known as Sammy the Bull. It tells his story of running with a street gang to being the Underboss of this country's most powerful mafia family. Peter Maas makes Gravano seem like a man with morals at times but the truth is that he participated in the murder of 19 people. He shows you how easy it was for Sammy to kill and how easily he could have gotten killed. In the end, Sammy flipped and Gotti got life in prison.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 15, 2004

    Trilling,Ride

    This book had me rivited to my seat. This is a story of a man torn between, being a civilian? or live the life as a made man. Sammy chose the later until this life was about to fall in on him, the government was his only out. Life in a witness protection after giving testamony on his superiors and those who worked under his command in one of the largest crime families, this is a story that takes you to the inner most santions of life in a crime family.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 24, 2001

    One of the Best Book s that I've ever read

    I could not put this book down-I hated to see it end. It such an interesting insight into the Mafia and their way of life. I had to keep telling myself that this was Non-fiction and that these events really did happen! Even though you know that Sammy was in the Mafia and the Underboss, I think that he's an extremely likeable person-what he did took a lot of courage and guts. I wish him well

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 8, 2001

    INSIDE STORY..

    I will not take sides here,while reading the reviews i've noticed that some have referred to Gravano as a rat saving his own skin , and some saw him as a hero well it depends on how you view the matter.As for the book its very interesting and detailed, it's all about breaking the omerta code and exposing the Mafia or Cosa Nostra.Sammy Gravano explains honestly the tough life of a mobster, how he started as a nobody to becoming the under boss of the Gambino family, also reveals the insides and rules of the Mafia. Great book full of lies, murder and betrayal.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 23, 2001

    Great reading!

    Great reading is what i found in this book! I simply could not put it down! Great insight information! Fascinating!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 14, 2000

    The Best mafia book ever Since the God Father

    The book is the best, no other book talkes about the mafia. Sammy describes all the detailes of the mafias live. I truly recommend this book for people that are interested in finding out about the mafia and how it workes.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 22, 2000

    Mafia Exposed!

    A shocking exposure of the most intimate kind regarding the mob. While most people think they know what the Mafia does and how they do it, this book will dispell many misplaced beliefs and myths. Although it jumps around a bit with dates and places, you will not be disappointed as the inner workings of the mob are exposed for all to read.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 23, 2000

    An emotionally honest, straight, account of one mans life in crime (and a little bit about the gotti trial, too).

    This book is an immensley interesting and surprisingly quick read. One finds him(her)self so enthralled in UNDERBOSS that you are suprised so many pages have turned. Though there are parts that seem to be farfetched, they do not compromise the book as a whole. I was very much impressed and would without a doubt purchase any further memoirs printed by Mr. Gravano.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 10, 1999

    LIVE OR DIE IS THE QUESTION

    BADABIK-BADABOM! THAT'S HOW EASY IT WAS FOR SAMMY 'THE BULL' GRAVANO TO MAKE THE MOST IMPORTANT DECISION OF A MAFIOSO'S LIFE.ONLY THAT WHAT HE DID,YOU CAN CALL SOMEONE A REAL MAN.SOMEONE WHO WAS CALLED A GOOD FRIEND OF MINE BUT AT THE SAME TIME A FRIEND OF HIS OWN.I CAN UNDERSTAND THE POSITION 'THE BULL' WAS IN, DUE TO THE FACT THAT EVERYONE HAS TO MAKE THAT ONE THOUGHT IN MIND OF WEAHTER TO LIVE OR DIE.THE MAFIOSOS WERE VERY INTO THE LORD BUT SAMMY KNEW THAT YOU ARE ON THIS PLANET JUST ONCE IN A LIFETIME.TO 'THE BULL' BEING CALLED 'A FRIEND OF OURS' WAS A DREAM COME TRUE TO SOMEONE WHO GREW UP IN A ROUGH NEIGHBORHOOD.PETER MAAS THE AURTHOR OF THIS BIOGRAPHY BOOK DID A EXCELLENT JOB.I'VE READ THIS BOOK TWICE STAYING WITH THE THOUGHT THAT IF THY'RE NOT BLOOD FAMILY THAN IT WOULD TAKE ALOT MORE THAN A KISS ON EACH CHICK TO GET MY FULL TRUST.SALVATORO 'THE BULL' GRAVANO DID MAKE THE RIGHT CHOICE OF BEING THE BEST FRIEND ANYONE HAS EVER HAD,HIS OWN BEST 'FRIEND'.THERE'S ALOT MORE TO THIS STORY SO I RECOMMEND IT TO ANYONE WHO WANTS TO KNOW JUST EXACTLY WHAT ONE GETS THEMSELVES INTO WHEN THEY BECOME 'A MADE GUY'.NOT ONLY DO I RATE THE BOOK ALL 5 STARS BUT I ALSO RATE SAMMY 'THE BULL' ALL 5 STARS FOR THE ANSWER OF THE QUESTION HE WAS GIVEN,'LIVE OR DIE?'WHAT WOULD BE YOUR ANSWER,THINK ABOUT IT.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 21, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 22, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 24, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 26 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)