Underground Life

Underground Life

2.7 4
by Gad Beck, Frank Heibert
     
 

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ISBN-10: 0299165043

ISBN-13: 9780299165048

Pub. Date: 05/01/2009

Publisher: University of Wisconsin Press

That a Jew living in Nazi Berlin survived the Holocaust at all is surprising. That he was a homosexual and a teenage leader in the resistance and yet survived is amazing. But that he endured the ongoing horror with an open heart, with love and without vitriol, and has written about it so beautifully is truly miraculous. This is Gad Beck’s story.

Overview

That a Jew living in Nazi Berlin survived the Holocaust at all is surprising. That he was a homosexual and a teenage leader in the resistance and yet survived is amazing. But that he endured the ongoing horror with an open heart, with love and without vitriol, and has written about it so beautifully is truly miraculous. This is Gad Beck’s story.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780299165048
Publisher:
University of Wisconsin Press
Publication date:
05/01/2009
Series:
Living Out: Gay and Lesbian Autobiog
Edition description:
1
Pages:
180
Sales rank:
766,013
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.41(d)

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Underground Life 2.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Ronald_Beasley More than 1 year ago
I didn't expect there to be so much sex in a story about a Jewish boy living in Nazi Germany. I suppose something had to be done to lighten the mood, but Gad Beck seems to have seduced or been seduced by every man and boy in Berlin. Lucky him. He also found himself being, not only gay and Jewish under the thumb of Hitler's regime, but also part of the very resistance that saved a number of lives and even entire families on the better days. Not among those saved was Manfred Lewin, Beck's love, who chose his family over Beck and paid for it with his life at Auschwitz. Beck's story is undeniably tragic, especially considering Beck's own recent death in June 2012, which means that he had to live for seventy years after losing almost everyone important to him. The point of the book is how he's managed this by treating every memory as a positive event, every gain and loss of friends and lovers as somehow worth it. It's improbable that anyone reading this book will ever have to endure similar trials, but if the time ever comes, Beck has left us with valuable lessons for dealing with the worst of human nature: spend as much time as possible with the people you love, fight evil however and whenever you can, and never miss a chance to have sex.
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