Understanding And Managing Vision Deficits: A GUIDE FOR OCCUPATIONAL THERAPISTS

Understanding And Managing Vision Deficits: A GUIDE FOR OCCUPATIONAL THERAPISTS

by Mitchell Scheiman
     
 

Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Trudy Mallinson, MS, OTR/L(Univ of Illinois at Chicago Coll of Associated Health Professions)
Description: This book provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of optometry. The initial chapters present a framework for conceptualizing vision and visual difficulties followed by a detailed presentation of screening assessments available for the detection of visual problems. Subsequent chapters describe the general management of visual deficits, including how optometrists treat patients with particular problems, collaboration between occupational therapists and optometrists to facilitate treatment, and brief case studies that highlight this process. The concluding chapter presents activity analysis and synthesis.
Purpose: The goal is to create a resource for occupational therapists that facilitates the understanding of vision and encourages effective treatment of patients with visual deficits. Historically, an important client group, occupational therapists are showing renewed interest in treating visually impaired clients.
Audience: This book is well suited for students and practitioners and is presented by an optometrist and several contributors who are all experienced in the field.
Features: Table summaries are found throughout the book. They are visually appealing and make reviewing chapter content a breeze. The illustrations are clear and informative, although repetition of some illustrations is a little distracting. A thorough glossary is provided.
Assessment: This book presents a thorough overview of the conceptual background, assessment, and treatment of vision and visual deficits from the perspective of an optometrist. Guidelines for collaboration between occupational therapists and optometrists are provided. The title is somewhat misleading because the book primarily describes the perspective of the optometrist. In this sense, the book suffers from a loose focus on occupation particularly the psychosocial aspects of visual impairment such as the impact of vision on motivation and the meaning of visual function tasks in a predominantly sighted world. The discussion of task analysis uses a little-known frame of reference and is probably too brief to be of practical use to clinicians.
Reviewer: Trudy Mallinson, MS, OTR/L(Univ of Illinois at Chicago Coll of Associated Health Professions)
Description: This book provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of optometry. The initial chapters present a framework for conceptualizing vision and visual difficulties followed by a detailed presentation of screening assessments available for the detection of visual problems. Subsequent chapters describe the general management of visual deficits, including how optometrists treat patients with particular problems, collaboration between occupational therapists and optometrists to facilitate treatment, and brief case studies that highlight this process. The concluding chapter presents activity analysis and synthesis.
Purpose: The goal is to create a resource for occupational therapists that facilitates the understanding of vision and encourages effective treatment of patients with visual deficits. Historically, an important client group, occupational therapists are showing renewed interest in treating visually impaired clients.
Audience: This book is well suited for students and practitioners and is presented by an optometrist and several contributors who are all experienced in the field.
Features: Table summaries are found throughout the book. They are visually appealing and make reviewing chapter content a breeze. The illustrations are clear and informative, although repetition of some illustrations is a little distracting. A thorough glossary is provided.
Assessment: This book presents a thorough overview of the conceptual background, assessment, and treatment of vision and visual deficits from the perspective of an optometrist. Guidelines for collaboration between occupational therapists and optometrists are provided. The title is somewhat misleading because the book primarily describes the perspective of the optometrist. In this sense, the book suffers from a loose focus on occupation particularly the psychosocial aspects of visual impairment such as the impact of vision on motivation and the meaning of visual function tasks in a predominantly sighted world. The discussion of task analysis uses a little-known frame of reference and is probably too brief to be of practical use to clinicians.
Trudy Mallinson
This book provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of optometry. The initial chapters present a framework for conceptualizing vision and visual difficulties followed by a detailed presentation of screening assessments available for the detection of visual problems. Subsequent chapters describe the general management of visual deficits, including how optometrists treat patients with particular problems, collaboration between occupational therapists and optometrists to facilitate treatment, and brief case studies that highlight this process. The concluding chapter presents activity analysis and synthesis. The goal is to create a resource for occupational therapists that facilitates the understanding of vision and encourages effective treatment of patients with visual deficits. Historically, an important client group, occupational therapists are showing renewed interest in treating visually impaired clients. This book is well suited for students and practitioners and is presented by an optometrist and several contributors who are all experienced in the field. Table summaries are found throughout the book. They are visually appealing and make reviewing chapter content a breeze. The illustrations are clear and informative, although repetition of some illustrations is a little distracting. A thorough glossary is provided. This book presents a thorough overview of the conceptual background, assessment, and treatment of vision and visual deficits from the perspective of an optometrist. Guidelines for collaboration between occupational therapists and optometrists are provided. The title is somewhat misleading because the book primarily describes the perspective of theoptometrist. In this sense, the book suffers from a loose focus on occupation particularly the psychosocial aspects of visual impairment such as the impact of vision on motivation and the meaning of visual function tasks in a predominantly sighted world. The discussion of task analysis uses a little-known frame of reference and is probably too brief to be of practical use to clinicians.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781556422836
Publisher:
SLACK, Incorporated
Publication date:
01/28/1997
Edition description:
Older Edition
Pages:
422
Product dimensions:
5.00(w) x 7.25(h) x (d)

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