Understanding Pharmacology for Pharmacy Technicians / Edition 1

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Overview

This textbook provides a basis of pharmacology for pharmacy technicians. Throughout Understanding Pharmacology for Pharmacy Technicians, anatomy and physiology are discussed in relation to various disorders and associated pharmacotherapies to give the pharmacy technician students a context for how drugs work. Students using this text will learn the therapeutic effects of prescription medications, nonprescription medications, and alternative therapies commonly used to treat diseases affecting that system, and their adverse effects. An emphasis is placed on practical applications for the technician. What types of issues will techs encounter at work? What is their role in patient education? How do they work with the pharmacist? Key Features throughout the book include:
• Cases to open each chapter, along with questions for discussion
• Pronunciations for difficult terms or words such as disease names
• Figures and illustrations
• Alerts that point out areas of potential dangers or errors, including look-alike/sound-alike drugs.
• Practice points, including mention of any FDA-required patient medication guides, and any "special" drug storage and dispensing considerations, including beyond-use dating of open multi-use products.
• Commonly used and comprehensive drug tables.
• Chapter review questions The book's content is written to meet ASHP accreditation standards and therefore is one of the most comprehensive books on the market related to pharmacology for technicians.

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Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Lawrence P Carey, BS, PharmD (Temple University School of Pharmacy)
Description: The better educated technicians are, the more helpful they will be to supervising pharmacists. This book, designed to do just that, is a joy to read in terms of completeness as well as visual appeal. The tables at the end of each chapter add to its comprehensive nature.
Purpose: The purpose is to give pharmacy technicians a very broad and complete overview of the drugs they handle on a daily basis. This book is a welcome addition, as there is a dearth of books specifically written at an appropriate level for pharmacy technicians.
Audience: Although specifically targeted at pharmacy technicians, this book has the potential to help other audiences as well, such as LPNs, medical coders, and medical assistants. The author, the director of a technician program, is certainly credible, qualified, and knowledgeable about what technicians need to know.
Features: The book is organized in a modular format, for the most part by body system, ranging from the nervous and musculoskeletal system through the heart/lungs/abdomen, and ends with specific disciplines of pharmacy such as infectious disease and oncology. I particularly like the case questions in the margins and the summary tables at the end of each chapter (although there are some typographical errors in brand names of products, such as some nutritional supplements on p. 515). I also like the "practice points" that appear throughout, which will assist readers. The book is easy to read, although there are many pages with no illustrations, which may be a problem for visual learners.
Assessment: This book is well done. It is written at a higher level than other pharmacy/pharmacology books, which I consider to be an advantage. It is pleasing to read and is a very complete, useful reference. I teach in an allied health program that requires pharmacology and have yet to find a suitable textbook that is inclusive, well written, error free, and visually appealing. I would consider replacing the one I currently use (Essentials of Pharmacology for Health Occupations, 6th edition, Woodrow et al. (Delmar Cengage Learning, 2010) with this one, even though I do not teach technicians — it is that good.
Canadian Journal of Hospital Pharmacy - Susan Balagus

Understanding Pharmacology for Pharmacy Technicians (with workbook)
By Mary Ann Stuhan

Canadian Journal of Hospital Pharmacy

Mary Ann Stuhan has compiled this set of pharmacology learning tools to help pharmacy technicians acquire knowledge to meet the accreditation standards of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists and to aid in preparation for the US Pharmacy Technician Certification Board examination. Contributors and reviewers include clinical pharmacotherapy experts, pharmacy professors, pharmacy managers, and instructors and directors of pharmacy technician and technology programs.
Appropriately, the textbook opens with a chapter examining the practical and theoretical benefits of pharmacy technicians having an understanding of pharmacology.

The remainder of the textbook contains 34 chapters organized by body systems. In addition to explaining disease processes, goals of therapy, and the pharmacology of medications used to treat various health conditions, the text expands on terms and definitions, includes tables outlining pharmacotherapy, and offers review questions and references at the end of each chapter. If an introduction to a particular body system is required to understand the pharmacology concepts, labelled colour pictures are provided to clarify the relevant anatomy and physiology. The text also provides clinical vignettes to help technicians understand the patient’s perspective. Safety alerts and practice points highlight clinical, administrative, and product selection pearls. The layout makes the textbook easy to read. The content is indexed, and the main text links well to the accompanying workbook. Instructor resources (PowerPoint slides) are also available; however, they offer none of the practical aspects or practice points from the textbook and workbook, and rarely include helpful images to engage the viewer. Despite the visually pleasing layout of both the textbook and the workbook, references to the policies of US drug regulatory authorities, as well as US brand names and manufacturers, limit the utility of this package for Canadian pharmacy technicians. In addition, many chapters provide anatomic, physiologic, or pharmacokinetic complexity that may exceed the needs or interests of technicians.

For example, the description of pharmacokinetic concepts includes complex equations requiring scientific calculators and an advanced proficiency in mathematics. Each chapter contains multiple cases and associated questions; however, the layout makes it difficult to link the questions to particular cases. Appropriate auxiliary labelling and suggestions for handling medications would increase the practicality and applicability for technicians in the workplace. This text and its associated workbook could serve as a resource for pharmacy technicians challenging licensing or qualifying examinations. It might also be useful for undergraduate students interested in exploring a career in pharmacy or as an addition to a pharmacy technician library, for reference or teaching purposes. Overall, this set of learning tools is best utilized together, as the workbook greatly increases relevance and practicality for a working pharmacy technician.

Susan Balagus
Practice Development Pharmacy Technician
Amy J Marriott, BSc, BScPharm, ACPR, PharmD
Practice Development Pharmacist
Winnipeg Regional Health Authority Pharmacy Program
Winnipeg, Manitoba
Competing interests: None declared.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781585282296
  • Publisher: American Society of Health-System Pharmacists
  • Publication date: 11/1/2012
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Sales rank: 653,115
  • Product dimensions: 8.40 (w) x 10.80 (h) x 0.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Mary Ann Stuhan, PharmD, has been Pharmacy Program Manager at Cuyahoga Community College in Cleveland, Ohio since 2002, where she directs an ASHP-accredited Technician Training Program and advises pre-pharmacy students.  She received her BS in Pharmacy (Summa Cum Laude) at Duquesne University, and her PharmD at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center.

Dr. Stuhan began her pharmacy career as a technician, and has practiced professionally in a variety of settings, including retail, government, behavioral health, and teaching hospital.  She was Director of Pharmacy at St. Michael Hospital in Cleveland, and continues to practice in long-term acute care at Kindred Hospital, Cleveland.  She is a lecturer for the University of Colorado Denver School of Pharmacy NonTraditional PharmD Program.

Dr. Stuhan is past president of the PTCB Certification Council and has held office on the executive board of the Pharmacy Technician Educators Council, which honored her with their Pharmacy Technician Educator of the Year Award in 2007.  She is also an active member of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Cleveland Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Ohio Society of Health-System Pharamacists, and Ohio Pharmacists Association.  She has been a peer-reviewer and written numerous articles and book reviews for the Journal of Pharmacy Technology.  Her practice focuses are adverse drug reactions, anemia therapy, and antimicrobial stewardship. 

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Table of Contents


Preface ........................................................................................................................ix
Editor, Contributors, and Reviewers ...................................................................xi
Part 1: Introduction ................................................................................................. 1
1. Why Technicians Need to Study Pharmacology and Therapeutics ........................ 3
Jonathan Roach, BSAS, AAS, CPhT
2. Pharmacokinetics ...............................................................................................9
Sandra B. Earle, PharmD, BCPS
Part 2: The Nervous System ................................................................................. 19
3. The Autonomic Nervous System ....................................................................... 21
Mary Ann Stuhan, PharmD, RPh
Raymond A. Lorenz, PharmD, BCPP
Alejandro Pino-Figueroa, PhD
Mark B ö hlke, PhD
Timothy J. Maher, PhD
(with contributions from Karen A. Newell, MMSc, PA-C, and Elizabeth P. Rothschild,
MMSc, PA-C)
4. Central Nervous System ................................................................................... 45
Raymond A. Lorenz, PharmD, BCPP
5. Neurologic Disorders ........................................................................................63
Toy S. Biederman, PharmD
6. Psychiatric Diseases ..........................................................................................97
Toy S. Biederman, PharmD
Part 3: The Endocrine System ........................................................................... 127
7. Overview of the Endocrine System and Agents .............................................. 129
Sherrill J. Brown, DVM, PharmD, BCPS
Kendra Keeley Procacci, PharmD, BCPS, AE-C
Katherine S. Hale, PharmD, BCPS
8. Adrenal Gland Hormones .............................................................................. 153
Devra K. Dang, PharmD, BCPS, CDE, FNAP
Trinh Pham, PharmD, BCOP
Jennifer J. Lee, PharmD, BCPS, CDE
9. Diabetes Mellitus and Metabolic Syndrome .................................................... 173
Mary Ann Stuhan, PharmD, RPh
10. Reproductive Hormones ................................................................................. 193
Jennifer J. Lee, PharmD, BCPS, CDE
Nina Yen, PharmD, BCACP
Devra K. Dang, PharmD, BCPS, CDE, FNAP
Part 4: The Musculoskeletal System and Related Topics ...............................227
11. Overview of the Musculoskeletal System ...........................................................229
Elizabeth P. Rothschild, MMSc, PA-C
Karen A. Newell, MMSc, PA-C
12. Musculoskeletal Disorders .................................................................................241
Amanda R. Margolis, PharmD, MS
Arthur A. Schuna, MS, FASHP
Part 5: The Cardiovascular and Renal Systems ................................................267
13. Overview of the Cardiovascular and Renal Systems ...........................................269
Mate M. Soric, PharmD, BCPS
14. Hypertension ....................................................................................................287
Mate M. Soric, PharmD, BCPS
15. Heart Disease....................................................................................................309
Mate M. Soric, PharmD, BCPS
16. Hyperlipidemia..................................................................................................351
Mate M. Soric, PharmD, BCPS
Part 6: The Respiratory System ...........................................................................365
17. Overview of the Respiratory System ..................................................................367
Christina Bell, PharmD
Sandra B. Earle, PharmD, BCPS
18. Disorders of the Respiratory System ..................................................................375
Christina Bell, PharmD
Sandra B. Earle, PharmD, BCPS
Part 7: The Gastrointestinal System ...................................................................401
19. Acid-Related Diseases of the Upper Gastrointestinal Tract .................................403
Randolph V. Fugit, PharmD, BCPS
Stuart D. Rockafellow, PharmD
Rosemary R. Berardi, PharmD, FCCP, FASHP, FAPhA
20. Nausea, Vomiting, and Upper GI Tract Motility Disorders ...................................429
Tibb F. Jacobs, PharmD, BCPS
Jamie M. Terrell, PharmD
21. Lower Gastrointestinal Tract ..............................................................................443
Candace T. Chelette, PharmD
Jeffery D. Evans, PharmD
22. Hepatic and Pancreatic Disorders ......................................................................481
Brian A. Hemstreet, PharmD, BCPS
23. Nutritional Pharmacology ..................................................................................499
Carol Battles, PhD, RD, LD, CHES
Steven W. Plogsted, PharmD, BCNSP, CNSC
Mary Ann Stuhan, PharmD, RPh
Part 8: The Hematologic System .........................................................................529
24. Overview of the Hematologic System ................................................................531
Mate M. Soric, PharmD, BCPS
25. Disorders of the Hematologic System ................................................................543
Marcia E. Honisko, PharmD, RPh
Megan A. Kaun, PharmD, RPh, BCPS
Part 9: Infectious Diseases ....................................................................................563
26. Bacterial Infections............................................................................................565
John Flanigan, PharmD, BCNSP
James Adams, PharmD, BCPS
Catherine W. Davis, PharmD, BCPS
27. Viral Infections ..................................................................................................597
John Flanigan, PharmD, BCNSP
James Adams, PharmD, BCPS
Catherine W. Davis, PharmD, BCPS
28. The Antifungal Agents ......................................................................................621
Michael E. Klepser, PharmD, FCCP
Stephanie A. Klepser, PharmD
Christopher M. Archangeli
29. Immunobiologics ..............................................................................................633
James A. Rapacchietta, PharmD, BCNSP
Mandy J. Hemmert, PharmD
Jessica P. Tilley, PharmD
Part 10: Antineoplastic Agents ............................................................................655
30. Cancer..............................................................................................................657
Allen L. Horne, BSPharm, RPh
Part 11: The Dermatologic System .....................................................................685
31. Overview of the Skin and Topical Dosage Forms ................................................687
Laura A. Perry, PharmD, BCPS
Lori J. Ernsthausen, PharmD, BCPS
32. Treatment of Dermatologic Disorders ................................................................699
Lori J. Ernsthausen, PharmD, BCPS
Laura A. Perry, PharmD, BCPS
Part 12: Preparations for the Eye, Ear, Nose, and Throat ..............................735
33. Ophthalmic Medications ...................................................................................737
Celtina K. Reinert, PharmD
34. Ear Medications ................................................................................................753
Allison R. King, PharmD
35. Mouth, Throat, and Nose Medications ..............................................................763
Celtina K. Reinert, PharmD
Index ..........................................................................................................................777
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