Understanding Web Services: XML, WSDL, SOAP, and UDDI

Paperback (Print)
Buy Used
Buy Used from BN.com
$26.47
(Save 41%)
Item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging.
Condition: Used – Good details
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $1.99
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 95%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (31) from $1.99   
  • New (5) from $24.40   
  • Used (26) from $1.99   

Overview

Web services enable the new generation of Internet-based applications. These services support application-to-application Internet communication--that is, applications at different network locations can be integrated to function as if they were part of a single, large software system. Examples of applications made possible by Web services include automated business transactions and direct (nonbrowser) desktop and handheld device access to reservations, stock trading, and order-tracking systems.

Several key standards have emerged that together form the foundation for Web services: XML (Extensible Markup Language), WSDL (Web Services Definition Language), SOAP (Simple Object Access Protocol), and UDDI (Universal Description, Discovery, and Integration). In addition, ebXML (Electronic Business XML) has been specified to facilitate automated business process integration among trading partners.

This book introduces the main ideas and concepts behind core and extended Web services' technologies and provides developers with a primer for each of the major technologies that have emerged in this space. In addition, Understanding Web Services summarizes the major architectural approaches to Web services, examines the role of Web services within the .NET and J2EE communities, and provides information about major product offerings from BEA, Hewlett-Packard, IBM, IONA, Microsoft, Oracle, Sun Microsystems, and others.

Key topics include:

  • XML facilities for structuring and serializing data
  • How WSDL maps services onto communication protocols and transports
  • WSDL support for RPC-oriented and document-oriented interactions
  • SOAP's required and optional elements
  • Message processing and the role of intermediaries in SOAP
  • UDDI data formats and APIs
  • How ebXML offers an alternative to Web services that supports reliable messaging, security, and trading-partner negotiations

With Understanding Web Services , you will be well informed and well positioned to participate in this vast, emerging marketplace.

0201750813B05172002

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
Few people understand web services and their implications as thoroughly as Eric Newcomer. Newcomer’s been there since the beginning. He helped to define SOAP, and now leads the web services efforts for IONA Technologies, a firm with unparalleled knowledge about distributed computing infrastructure. In this book, Newcomer offers an invaluable platform-independent view of web services technologies, standards, applications, and architecture.

Newcomer begins by outlining how web services compare with previous technologies, how key web services technologies fit together, and the diverse views of web services held by leading vendors. He explains how XML serves as a foundation for web services, concisely explaining the roles of schema, namespaces, DOM and SAX, and XSLT transformations, and demonstrating how XML liberates data types and structures from individual programming languages and vendor restrictions.

Next, he drills down into each of the three core technologies that have been layered onto XML to make web services development viable.

First comes WSDL, which establishes a common format for describing and publishing web service information. Both parties need copies of the same WSDL file, but once they do, it acts as a “secret decoder ring” for encoding and decoding messages regardless of whether you’re communicating with COM, EJB, JMS, CORBA, or whatever else.

Next, he moves to SOAP, which “accomplishes arguably the most important aspect of web services, getting the data from one place to another over the network.” He covers SOAP’s interaction patterns, messages and message processing, the components of SOAP messages, forthcoming changes in SOAP 1.2, and even “de facto” enhancements like SOAP Attachments.

You’ll learn how UDDI provides a powerful and flexible framework for registering and discovering business information across the Internet and behind your firewall. You’ll especially appreciate this chapter’s step-by-step usage scenario, and Newcomer’s willingness to discuss UDDI’s current limitations.

A bonus that isn’t included in the subtitle: a full chapter on ebXML, which provides a robust, secure, relatively low-cost communications environment for business transactions, and increasingly complements existing web services standards rather than seeking to replace them.

Newcomer concludes with a look at web services architecture and security, including coverage of new initiatives like the Security Assertions Markup Language (SAML), XML Key Management Specification (SKMS), and Microsoft’s WS-License and WS-Security proposals.

Whether you’re a decision maker or developer, Understanding Web Services gives you the essence of web services -- without the nonsense. (Bill Camarda)

Bill Camarda is a consultant, writer, and web/multimedia content developer. His 15 books include Special Edition Using Word 2000 and Upgrading & Fixing Networks For Dummies®, Second Edition.

From The Critics
Written for developers, this book introduces the major ideas behind core and extended Web services' technologies and serves as a primer covering the prominent emerging technologies in this area. It summarizes the major architectural approaches to Web services, examines the role of Web services within the .NET and J2EE communities, and describes the products of major companies. Newcomer is a technical officer with a company providing e-business platforms. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780201750812
  • Publisher: Addison-Wesley
  • Publication date: 5/28/2002
  • Series: Independent Technology Guides
  • Pages: 332
  • Product dimensions: 7.30 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author

Eric Newcomer is chief technical officer at IONA (http://www.iona.com), an independent provider of e-business platforms for Web services integration. As a member of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), the organization responsible for establishing Web standards, he participates in the XML Protocols and Web Services Architecture Working Groups. He is also IONA's representative to UDDI.org and has been active in Web services since early 2000. He is the coauthor of the highly acclaimed Principles of Transaction Processing (Morgan Kaufmann, 1997), as well as numerous journal articles, chapters, and conference reports.

0201750813AB05022002

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

I first encountered

I joined IONA in the fall of 1999 and among other things soon began chairing the Object Management Group submitter's team drafting the

IONA formally joined the SOAP effort in March 2000, before IBM joined and put the effort on the map. I worked with Andrew Layman, David Turner, John Montgomery, and others at Microsoft to bring IONA into the picture as a SOAP supporter and, in fact, as the first J2EE vendor to support SOAP. IONA demonstrated Web services interoperability at several Microsoft events during that year. The Microsoft presenter would introduce its SOAP Toolkit and demonstrate interoperability with a COM server. Then the IONA presenter was called on to describe how the same SOAP interface could interoperate with a Java server.

After that, I organized IONA's initial participation at W3C, supported the establishment of the

In October 2000, I represented IONA at the UDDI kick-off meeting. It was then that I realized the potential for Web services technologies for application integration inside the firewall. Why not use SOAP, UDDI, and WSDL for internal projects? Then you could use the same approach for integration, regardless of whether it's inside the company or across the Internet.

David Vaskevitch presented at the UDDI conference, and this reminded me of the 1995 chapter in The Future of Software that I coauthored for Digital Equipment Corporation. David was author of the Microsoft chapter in that same book. In the Digital chapter, "The Key to the Highway," Peter Conklin and I compared the potential power of software standards to the impact of standards on the automobile. Standardized parts enabled mass production, which revolutionized the industry and society. Today, software remains essentially a craft business, as automobiles were at the start of the twentieth century. Having widely adopted standards has remained elusive despite many attempts. We may be at the crossroads; Web services may finally do the trick.

I hope this book helps you understand what Web services are all about. If it serves as a decent introduction to the main ideas, concepts, and technologies, it will have done its job and find its place in the Web services community.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

(NOTE: Each chapter concludes with a Summary.)

Preface.

Acknowledgments.

Introduction.

1. Introducing Web Services.

The Basics of Web Services.

A Simple Example: Searching for Information.

The Next Generation of the Web.

Interacting with Web Services.

RPC-Oriented Interactions.

Document-Oriented Interactions.

The Technology of Web Services.

Usage Example.

XML: The Foundation.

WSDL: Describing Web Services.

SOAP: Accessing Web Services.

UDDI: Publishing and Discovering Web Services.

XML for Business Collaboration: ebXML.

Web Services versus Other Technologies.

Additional Technologies.

Vendor Approaches to Web Services.

2. Describing Information: XML.

A Simple Example.

Instance and Schema.

Data Type and Programming Language.

More on XML Schemas and DTDs.

Processing XML Documents.

Namespaces.

Transformation.

XSLT.

XPath.

Document Structure.

Mapping Tools.

A Simple Example (Revisited).

XML Specifications and Information.

XML Specifications Related to Web Services.

General Information.

3. Describing Web Services: WSDL.

WSDL Basics.

WSDL Elements.

The Extensible WSDL Framework.

Defining Message Data Types.

Defining Operations on Messages.

Mapping Messages to Protocols.

Putting It All Together.

Importing WSDL Elements.

WSDL-Related Namespaces.

Extensions for Binding to SOAP.

4. Accessing Web Services: SOAP.

A Simple Example.

The SOAP Specification.

SOAP Envelope.

SOAP Header.

SOAP Body.

SOAP Faults.

RPC Convention.

Data Type Mapping.

HTTP Binding.

Version Control.

SOAP Message Processing.

SOAP Use of Namespaces.

Changes in the v1.2 Draft.

SOAP Multipart MIME Attachments.

SOAP in the Context of Existing Systems.

SOAP's Future Directions.

5. Finding Web Services: UDDI Registry.

The UDDI Organization.

The Concepts Underlying UDDI.

How UDDI Works.

UDDI Data Model.

Generic Data.

The Business Entity.

The Binding Template.

The tModel.

UDDI SOAP APIs.

Inquiry APIs.

Publisher APIs.

Usage Scenario.

Updating the Registry.

Retrieving Information.

Using WSDL with UDDI.

UDDI for Private Use.

UDDI Support for SOAP, Complex Business Relationships, and Unicode.

SOAP.

Unicode.

6. An Alternative Approach: ebXML.

Overview of ebXML.

A Simple Example.

Deploying ebXML.

The ebXML Specifications.

Architectural Overview.

7. Web Services Architecture: Additional Technologies.

Security.

WS-License and WS-Security.

Process Flow.

XLANG.

Transaction Coordination.

BTP.

Extended Transactions.

Messaging.

WS-Inspection.

WS-Referral.

WS-Routing.

BEEP.

Reliable HTTP.

Web Services Foundations.

RosettaNet.

XML-RPC.

8. Implementing Web Services.

Implementation Architectures.

The Major Implementation Streams.

Microsoft's .NET.

J2EE and Application Servers.

Application Server Vendor View.

Java APIs for Web Services.

J2EE Initiatives for Additional Technologies.

Understanding .NET versus J2EE.

Vendor Views on Adoption of Web Services Technologies.

The Questionnaire.

BEA Systems.

Cape Clear.

Hewlett-Packard.

IBM.

IONA.

Microsoft.

Oracle.

Sun Microsystems.

Systinet.

Others.

Implementations of ebXML.

Index. 0201750813T05082002

Read More Show Less

Preface

I first encountered XML as an integration technology in early 1998 during a visit to KPN Telecom in the Netherlands. The company was asking for proposals to help it develop an enterprise integration architecture based on the hub and spoke model, using XML as the canonical message format that would tie together the company's thousands of systems and hundreds of programming languages. My employer at the time, Compaq (Digital), did not win the project, but the controversial idea of using XML in a data-independent integration layer stuck with me. Now Web services are fulfilling that promise for everyone.

I joined IONA in the fall of 1999 and among other things soon began chairing the Object Management Group submitter's team drafting the XML Value specification, mapping XML to CORBA. In early 2000, I got involved in the new effort Microsoft was leading to define a distributed computing protocol for the Internet: SOAP. Previous attempts to promote the CORBA protocol had failed by then, and the W3C's own attempt, HTTP-NG, had also fallen flat. But the idea of serializing XML over HTTP seemed to hold promise for a solution.

IONA formally joined the SOAP effort in March 2000, before IBM joined and put the effort on the map. I worked with Andrew Layman, David Turner, John Montgomery, and others at Microsoft to bring IONA into the picture as a SOAP supporter and, in fact, as the first J2EE vendor to support SOAP. IONA demonstrated Web services interoperability at several Microsoft events during that year. The Microsoft presenter would introduce its SOAP Toolkit and demonstrate interoperability with a COM server. Then the IONA presenter was called on to describe how the same SOAP interface could interoperate with a Java server.

After that, I organized IONA's initial participation at W3C, supported the establishment of the XML Protocols Working Group, helped write the group charter, and began representing IONA at the XML Protocols Working Group, and more recently, at the Web Services Architecture Working Group. IONA has supported the submission of SOAP to W3C, WSDL, SOAP with Attachments, and XKMS. One thing led to another, and I eventually took on the responsibility of delivering IONA's implementation of Web services integration technologies.

In October 2000, I represented IONA at the UDDI kick-off meeting. It was then that I realized the potential for Web services technologies for application integration inside the firewall. Why not use SOAP, UDDI, and WSDL for internal projects? Then you could use the same approach for integration, regardless of whether it's inside the company or across the Internet.

David Vaskevitch presented at the UDDI conference, and this reminded me of the 1995 chapter in The Future of Software that I coauthored for Digital Equipment Corporation. David was author of the Microsoft chapter in that same book. In the Digital chapter, "The Key to the Highway," Peter Conklin and I compared the potential power of software standards to the impact of standards on the automobile. Standardized parts enabled mass production, which revolutionized the industry and society. Today, software remains essentially a craft business, as automobiles were at the start of the twentieth century. Having widely adopted standards has remained elusive despite many attempts. We may be at the crossroads; Web services may finally do the trick.

I hope this book helps you understand what Web services are all about. If it serves as a decent introduction to the main ideas, concepts, and technologies, it will have done its job and find its place in the Web services community.

0201750813P05082002

Read More Show Less

Introduction

I first encountered XML as an integration technology in early 1998 during a visit to KPN Telecom in The Netherlands. They were asking for proposals to help them develop an enterprise integration architecture based on the hub and spoke model, using XML as the canonical message format that would tie together their thousands of systems and hundreds of programming languages. My employer at the time, Compaq (Digital) did not win the project, but the controversial idea of using XML in a data-independent integration layer stuck with me. Now Web services are fulfilling that potential for everyone.

After joining IONA in the fall of 1999, among other things I ended up chairing the Object Management Group submitter's team drafting the XML Value specification, mapping XML to CORBA. In early 2000 I got involved in the new effort Microsoft was leading to define a distributed computing protocol for the Internet-SOAP. Previous attempts to promote the CORBA protocol had failed by then, and the W3C's own attempt, HTTP-NG, had also fallen flat. But the idea of serializing XML over HTTP seemed to hold promise for a solution.

IONA joined the SOAP effort in March 2000, before IBM joined and put the effort on the map. I worked with Andrew Layman, David Turner, John Montgomery, and others at Microsoft to bring IONA into the picture as a SOAP supporter—in fact, the first J2EE vendor to support SOAP. IONA demonstrated Web services interoperability at several Microsoft events during that year. The Microsoft presenter would introduce their SOAP Toolkit and demonstrate interoperability with a COM server. Then they would call on the IONA presenter todescribe how the same SOAP interface could interoperate with a CORBA server.

After that, I organized IONA's initial participation at W3C, supported the establishment of the XML Protocols Working Group, helped write the group charter, and began representing IONA along with Oisin Hurley. IONA also supported the submission of SOAP to W3C, and WSDL, SOAP with Attachments, WSDL, and XKMS. One thing led to another, and eventually I took on the responsibility of delivering IONA's implementation of Web services technologies. I haven't had much time for committee work since then, but maybe now that this book is done, and our initial products released, I can jump back in.

In October of 2000, I attended the UDDI kick off meeting for IONA. It was at that meeting that I realized the potential for Web services technologies inside the firewall. Why not use UDDI and WSDL for internal integration projects? Then you can use the same approach for integration, regardless of whether it's inside the company or across the Internet.

David Vaskevitch presented at the UDDI conference, and this reminded me of the 1995 chapter that I co-authored for Digital Equipment Corporation for a book called The Future of Software. David was co-author of the Microsoft chapter in that same book. Digital's chapter was called "The Key to the Highway," and in it Peter Conklin and I compared the potential power of software standards to the impact of standards on the automobile. Standardized parts enabled mass production, which revolutionized industry and society. Today, software remains essentially a craft business, as automobiles were at the start of the twentieth century. Widely adopted standards have remained elusive, despite many attempts. We may be finally at the crossroads; Web services may finally do the trick.

I hope this book helps you understand what this Web services thing is all about. If it serves as a decent introduction to the main ideas, concepts, and technologies, it will have done its job, and found its place in the Web services community. One can only hope and aim for that.



Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 2, 2007

    Only the title is good

    I am angry that I wasted my time with this book. I was exited to find a book that would deal with WSDL, SOAP, and UDDI. Unfortunately only the title is good. The book is confusing, and often irrelevant. Did they even have anyone read it and give advice? Every paragraph has a useless one-liner (after of before, I couldn't figure it out) that is inconsistent. Sometimes it looks like the topic sentence, sometimes it looks like a sub-heading, sometimes I can't understand it at all. After a while reading the ramblings and confusion of the author, those tag lines became attractive. You could just read them and be as little educated about the subject as reading the entire book. I think that the author wrote this book in the following manner: 1. Pick a title 2. Write a bulleted list of things related to the title. 3. Take each bullet, and write a paragraph or two about it. That sounds like a good approach, but he succeeded only on 1 and 2. The paragraphs, even consecutive ones, seem to be unrelated. It is more like presentation notes for a class than a book. Sometimes I wondered hoe to paragraphs related. There was NO flow at all. The book doesn't go into depth at all. This book will not teach you XML, XSLT, Schema, WSDL, etc. It will confuse you. I feel sorry for the people who buy this book thinking that it will teach them those technologies. The author is not neutral, he is pitching IONA. That is so unfortunate. He has somewhat impressive credentials, but I get the impression that he has never really written a web service for corporate use. His way of teaching is 'there are tools that can generate this stuff for you', for example in the case of WSDL. He will not explain to you even the WSDL data types. He says: 'WSDL files are typically generated, so don't worry too much about their individual complexity the main point is to understand how WSDL solves particular problems.' The issue is that the tools that generate WSDL are not very good. There are situations when you need to know WSDL. This book really is the worst book I have ever read in my life.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 17, 2004

    Not Very Fond of This

    I'm sure that the content is extremely useful to the right audience. However, I have never had so much difficulty getting through a book on a technical topic. It could not have been written any drier.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)