Undying

Overview

November 2004: George W. Bush is re-elected. Five days later, Alan Meister, a New York professor of philosophy, is diagnosed with lymphoma?not that he can prove the two are connected. While coping with the rigors of chemotherapy, Alan begins work on a long-postponed book titled The Health of a Sick Man, arguing that the core of Friedrich Nietzsche?s philosophical thought was a decades-long attempt to cope with his lifelong incapacities?his blinding headaches, upset stomach, weak vision, and all-around frailty, ...

See more details below
Paperback
$14.14
BN.com price
(Save 11%)$15.95 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (19) from $1.99   
  • New (10) from $1.99   
  • Used (9) from $1.99   
Undying: A Novel

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$10.99
BN.com price
(Save 31%)$15.95 List Price

Overview

November 2004: George W. Bush is re-elected. Five days later, Alan Meister, a New York professor of philosophy, is diagnosed with lymphoma—not that he can prove the two are connected. While coping with the rigors of chemotherapy, Alan begins work on a long-postponed book titled The Health of a Sick Man, arguing that the core of Friedrich Nietzsche’s philosophical thought was a decades-long attempt to cope with his lifelong incapacities—his blinding headaches, upset stomach, weak vision, and all-around frailty, not least his vexed relations with women. As Alan’s treatment proceeds, he finds relief by imagining Nietzsche not as a historical figure, but as a character in his daily life, a reminder that his own heart continues to beat.

Rooted in the author’s personal experience with lymphoma, this novel is a compound of reminiscences, aphorisms, anecdotes, and encounters: with Alan’s errant daughter Natasha, who has returned home to help care for him; with mortal friends; with a mysterious hospital roommate; with students; with contemporary life as it reaches him through the newspapers and his readings. Steady, spare, and often bracingly funny, Undying cries out in a robust voice: I am.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Gitlin (Sacrifice) offers a jumbled and heavy-handed reflection on life and illness in his unpolished latest. In the fall of 2004, Alan Meister, a professor of philosophy living in New York, contemplates the possible correlation between his recent cancer diagnosis and the re-election of George W. Bush. So begins the cataloguing of Alan's life, anchored by journal entries about his illness and treatment; his loving wife, Melanie; and the mildly but more playfully contentious relationship with his daughter, Natasha. There are long backwards glances at his past and an obsessive philosophical waxing on the ideas of Nietzsche—who becomes less a dead philosopher and more of a mentor and guide during Alan's treatment. Gitlin is generous with details about life in New York and living with cancer and finds some lovely moments dealing with each, but these elements alone aren't enough to create a satisfying narrative, muted as they are by uninspired intellectual rumination and wan nostalgia. (Feb.)
Library Journal
This book, which is based on a true experience of cancer, may first make one question the imprimatur of "novel"; however, it surprises with its forthright deliverance of exactly that, something new. Gitlin (The Bulldozer and the Big Tent: Blind Republicans, Lame Democrats, and the Recovery of American Ideals) introduces Alan, the philosophy professor narrator who muses about Nietzsche's painful life in relationship to his own physical pain. This intersection of the bald personal experience of lymphoma and conjecture about Nietzsche is surprisingly successful. The sections on chemotherapy are captivating and even humorous. The narrator's exclamation of joy as his hair falls out in the shower is delightful; he exults that the treatment is working. Informative sidelines cover his relationship with his students (he never stops working), his daughter (he never stops worrying), and his wife (infinitely supportive to a point). Though the fictitious narrator muses about a book on Nietzsche and illness that he might write, what the actual author delivers is much more useful. VERDICT This is an engaging journal documenting a different take on the experience of cancer and recovery; for all libraries.—Henry Bankhead, Los Gatos P.L., CA
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781582436463
  • Publisher: Counterpoint Press
  • Publication date: 2/1/2011
  • Pages: 256
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.10 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)