Uneasy Partnership: Pb

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Overview

Uneasy Partnership unravels the mutually dependent relationship between business and government in Canada. Governments depend on business investment for economic growth vital to the prosperity of their citizens, the generation of tax revenues, and enough public satisfaction to win them periodic re-election. Businesses depend on governments for more-or-less stable sets of rules that are necessary for success. They often look to governments for protection against threats to their well-being and for assistance in competing with other businesses.

Geoffrey Hale begins examining this relationship by considering the influence of political, economic, and societal ideas on the government's place in the economy along with the history of Canadian economic development. He continues by examining the effects of political and economic structures on the workings of the economy and on relations between business and governments. Finally, Hale discusses the interaction of the political marketplace—including organized business interests and individual businesses—with the policy process, including the influence of interest group politics on public opinion, the role of the courts and tribunals on law and policy, and political parties.

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What People Are Saying

Madelaine Drohan

This book brings clarity to the murky relationship between business and government in Canada. In tracing each stage of the relationship, from pre-Confederation to the present, the author reveals the intimate connection between politics and business in Canada. Anyone who truly wants to understand Canada—where we are and how we got here—should read this book.

Madelaine Drohan, author of Making a Killing: How and Why Companies Use Armed Force to Do Business

Kenneth Kernaghan

Both teachers and students are indebted to Professor Hale for this up-to-date, comprehensive, and high-quality text. It will make teaching and learning about business-government relations a more profitable and enjoyable experience. The text is carefully organized, easily readable, theoretically informed, and empirically well grounded.

Kenneth Kernaghan, Brock University

Ian Lee

In my judgment, there are only two texts in the business-government relations arena worthy for the classroom. Uneasy Partnership is one of them, because Hale demonstrates a deep understanding and synthesis not only of the political science and policy paradigms and literature, but equally of the business paradigm and literature. Unlike almost all texts dealing with this subject, Hale successfully and intelligently integrates the 'two solitudes' of business and government, in other words, business administration and political science—captured succinctly in the title. Thus, Hale provides a refreshing, nuanced, and balanced interpretation that demonstrates and explains why the partnership is so uneasy. As a professor in a business school with a doctorate in political science—formerly employed in both the Government (of Canada) and private sectors—I recommend this text for a course in business-government relations.

Ian Lee, Carleton University, Sprott School of Business

Madelaine Drohan

This book brings clarity to the murky relationship between business and government in Canada. In tracing each stage of the relationship, from pre-Confederation to the present, the author reveals the intimate connection between politics and business in Canada. Anyone who truly wants to understand Canada—where we are and how we got here—should read this book.

Kenneth Kernaghan

Both teachers and students are indebted to Professor Hale for this up-to-date, comprehensive, and high-quality text. It will make teaching and learning about business-government relations a more profitable and enjoyable experience. The text is carefully organized, easily readable, theoretically informed, and empirically well grounded.

Ian Lee

In my judgment, there are only two texts in the business-government relations arena worthy for the classroom. Uneasy Partnership is one of them, because Hale demonstrates a deep understanding and synthesis not only of the political science and policy paradigms and literature, but equally of the business paradigm and literature. Unlike almost all texts dealing with this subject, Hale successfully and intelligently integrates the 'two solitudes' of business and government, in other words, business administration and political science—captured succinctly in the title. Thus, Hale provides a refreshing, nuanced, and balanced interpretation that demonstrates and explains why the partnership is so uneasy. As a professor in a business school with a doctorate in political science—formerly employed in both the Government (of Canada) and private sectors—I recommend this text for a course in business-government relations.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781551115047
  • Publisher: University of Toronto Press, Higher Education Division
  • Publication date: 9/21/2006
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 546
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.06 (d)

Meet the Author

Geoffrey Hale is Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Lethbridge. As an academic but also as a civil servant and business association representative, he has spent much of the past twenty years dealing with tax and budgetary systems and their impact on various aspects of Canada's economy and society.

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgements

Part I: The Context for Business-Government Relations in Canada: Ideas, Ideologies, and Historical Development

Introduction

1. Business and Government: The Politics of Mutual Dependence

2. The Role of Government in the Economy: Economic Perspectives

3. Sources and Limits of Business Influence: Theories of Business-Government Relations

4. Business, Government, and the Politics of Development: 1760-1970

5. Business, Government, and the Politics of Economic Upheaval: 1970 to Present

Part II: Canada's Economic Structure and the Environment for Business-Government Relations

Introduction

6. Canada's Economic Structure: Diversity, Dynamism, and the Political Economy of Business-Government Relations

7. Federalism, Regionalism, and the Context for Business-Government Relations

8. Business, Government, and the North American and Global Economies

9. Government-Business Enterprises: The State Sector in Transition

Part III: Political Competition, Interest Groups, and the Political Marketplace

Introduction

10. The Political Marketplace: Interest Groups, Policy Communities, and Lobbying

11. The Internal Policy Process: Balancing Different Views of the Public Interest

12. The External Policy Process: Public Relations, Public Opinion, Political Advocacy, and Parliament

13. Litigation and the Judicial System: Lobbying by Other Means?

14. Business, Political Parties, and the Electoral Process

Glossary

References

Index

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