Unexplained Mysteries of World War II

Unexplained Mysteries of World War II

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by William B. Breuer
     
 

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As combat veterans and high commanders know, logic is often a stranger in wartime. —William B. Breuer, in

The annals of World War II are mined with captivating cases of strange coincidences, ominous premonitions, and baffling mysteries. Now, William Breuer's painstaking research has yielded over 100 fascinating historical accounts, including:

The

Overview

As combat veterans and high commanders know, logic is often a stranger in wartime. —William B. Breuer, in

The annals of World War II are mined with captivating cases of strange coincidences, ominous premonitions, and baffling mysteries. Now, William Breuer's painstaking research has yielded over 100 fascinating historical accounts, including:

The mysterious fire on the Normandie . . . Who really was behind the eerily efficient destruction of the famed ocean liner?

The ominous "Deadly Double" advertisement in The New Yorker . . . Was it a coded leak to Japanese and German spies announcing the upcoming bombing of Pearl Harbor?

The botched Nazi kidnapping of the Duke of Windsor . . . How did a serendipitous series of events save the duke from Hitler's grasp (and the Allied forces from a crippling strategic setback)?

The curious sinking of the Tang

. . . How did this deadliest of U.S. submarines come to meet such an unexpected and mysterious end?

"Anyone interested in twists of fate should find this book fascinating." —Library Journal

"While away a few hours or spend a few minutes at a time enjoying this collection of inexplicable, mysterious, and strange tales." —Nashville Banner

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
What do 50 doctors in Hawaii, a lost dog tag, and a $212 unpaid storage fee have in common? They are just a few of the strange occurrences, odd coincidences, and unexplained mysteries of World War II collected here by Breuer (Shadow Warriors, LJ 5/1/96), who offers a less serious look at a very serious subject. Some of the oddities he unearthed include a candy bar that saved a life and a German spy living next to the top British spy-catcher. Anyone interested in twists of fate should find this book fascinating. For public libraries.Terry L. Wirick, Erie Cty. Lib. System, Pa.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780471291077
Publisher:
Turner Publishing Company
Publication date:
10/28/1998
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
256
Sales rank:
353,301
Product dimensions:
6.14(w) x 9.20(h) x 0.66(d)

Meet the Author

WILLIAM B. BREUER is one of today's most popular military historians and the author of over 20 books, including The Great Raid on Cabanatuan, MacArthur's Undercover War, Shadow Warriors, and Feuding Allies, all from Wiley. He lives in Cleveland, Tennessee.

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Unexplained Mysteries of World War II 3.2 out of 5 based on 1 ratings. 5 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I bought this for my 15 yr. old son (who loves history) for Christmas. He was really excited to get it. He said it is great and has lots of interesting info. in it. I also bought him a book titled FUBAR to go with it it is soldier slang from W.W.II
MFowler More than 1 year ago
I bought Unexplained Mysteries of World War II, at, of all places, the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, DC. I am a World War II buff and it looked like an interesting and somewhat offbeat read. It was that, and in general I enjoyed the book until I became aware of numerous factual errors. The most grievous factual error (to me) was on page 160 in the People Who Vanished section, dealing with the B-24 bomber Lady Be Good. The story says that other than a few bits and pieces of clothing, etc., nothing was ever found of the crew. This is incorrect, and could have been verified with even some casual research in the library or on the Internet. In fact, all but one of the nine crewmember's bodies have been found and recovered. Diaries recovered from two of the crewmembers gave stark details of their doomed but determined trek north to try and escape the limitless desert. On page 174 in the People Who Vanished section, the book stated that the U.S. Navy was unable to explain why Flight 19 vanished, despite an exhaustive investigation. In actual fact, the Navy's 1946 report lists a number of Facts, Opinions and Conclusions based on multiple sources of evidence. More than a dozen specific factors were cited that led to the loss, the changing of any one of which would have resulted in a different outcome: the failure of Lt. Taylor's compass; Lt. Taylor's unfamiliarity with the area; the fact that none of the airplanes had an operable/accurate clock; bad radio reception; delays in sending out rescue airplanes; inability to obtain a prompt RDF fix on the flight to help guide it home; the onset of night, which meant the pilots were ditching at sea in the most hazardous conditions imaginable; failure of the teletype system to keep shore stations apprised of the situation, etc. The Navy is not mystified about what happened to Flight 19 - they screwed up, got lost, and died. On page 166 of the People Who Vanished section is told the discovery of the ship Rubicon adrift in the Florida Straits in 1944, her crew nowhere to be found. While newspaper stories at the time hinted that something odd, the final paragraph of the New York Times story about the incident indicates that the ship was moored in Havana and the lines may have given way during hurricane-force winds, blowing the ship out to sea sans crew. On page 28 of the Puzzling Events section, the advertisement for the game The Deadly Double that ran in The New Yorker just a few weeks before the Pearl Harbor attack is discussed, and it is stated that an unknown person who did not identify himself placed the ad - and that the man later met a violent end. In fact, the couple that placed the ad, Mr. and Mrs. Roger Craig, were interviewed by the FBI and completely cleared of anything other than being involved in a rather odd coincidence.
Dinah2 More than 1 year ago
My son, a retired Colonel, is in to all and anything regarding World War II. I thought this would be a great gift for him as a Christmas gift and he loved the book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Hello, When I read this book, I was astounded in it's stories of lost soliders and coincedences. I highly reccommend this book!