Unhealthy Societies

Overview

Among the developed countries it is not the richest societies which have the best health, but those which have the smallest income differences between rich and poor. Inequality and relative poverty have absolute effects: they increase death rates. But why? How can smaller income differences raise average life expectancy?
Using examples from the USA, Britain, Japan and Eastern Europe, and bringing together evidence from the social and medical sciences, Unhealthy Socities provides...

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Overview

Among the developed countries it is not the richest societies which have the best health, but those which have the smallest income differences between rich and poor. Inequality and relative poverty have absolute effects: they increase death rates. But why? How can smaller income differences raise average life expectancy?
Using examples from the USA, Britain, Japan and Eastern Europe, and bringing together evidence from the social and medical sciences, Unhealthy Socities provides the explanation. Healthy, egalitarian societies are more socially cohesive. They have a stronger community life and suffer fewer of the corrosive effects of inequality. As well as inequality weakening the social fabric, damaging health and increasing crime rates, Unhealthy Societies shows that social cohesion is crucial to the quality of life.
The contrast between the material success and social failure of modern societies marks an imbalance which needs attention. The relationship between health and equality suggests that important social needs will go unmet without a larger measure of social and distributive justice. This path-breaking book is essential reading for health psychologists, sociologists, welfare economists, social policy analysts and all those concerned with the future of developed societies.

The social economy of health, income distribution & health, psychosocial causes of illness, health inequalities, etc.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780415092340
  • Publisher: Taylor & Francis
  • Publication date: 9/12/1996
  • Pages: 272
  • Lexile: 1470L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 0.75 (d)

Meet the Author

Richard G. Wilkinson is Senior Research Fellow at The Trafford Centre for Medical Research, University of Sussex.

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Table of Contents

List of illustrations
Preface
1 Introduction: the social economy of health 1
2 Health becomes a social science 13
3 Rising life expectancy and the epidemiological transition 29
4 The problem of health inequalities 53
5 Income distribution and health 72
6 A small town in the USA, wartime Britain, Eastern Europe and Japan 113
7 An anthropology of social cohesion 137
8 The symptoms of disintegration 153
9 The psychosocial causes of illness 175
10 Baboons, civil servants and children's height 193
11 Social capital: putting Humpty together again 211
Bibliography 233
Name index 247
Subject index 251
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