Unified Field Theory for the Engineer and the Applied Scientist / Edition 1

Unified Field Theory for the Engineer and the Applied Scientist / Edition 1

by Larry Silverberg
     
 

The term field dynamics refers to the branch of physics that deals with objects and phenomena large enough to be measured and observed and is developed from four-dimensional geometry. Research that was once a major interest within theoretical physics has since passed to differential geometry, where it now has a strong mathematical foundation in hyper-dimensional

See more details below

Overview

The term field dynamics refers to the branch of physics that deals with objects and phenomena large enough to be measured and observed and is developed from four-dimensional geometry. Research that was once a major interest within theoretical physics has since passed to differential geometry, where it now has a strong mathematical foundation in hyper-dimensional field theories.
In this unique monograph the experienced author, Professor Silverberg, illustrates that modern field theory is an equally valuable tool for engineers and applied scientists when the unsolved problems become increasingly cross disciplinary.
From the contents:
* 4D Space
* Relativity
* Energy
* Change
* Governing Equations
* Waves
* Particles
* Electrodynamics
* Mechanics
* Essay: An Evolving Science
Features 40 end-of-chapter problems — with solutions free to lecturers.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9783527407880
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
02/17/2009
Pages:
194
Product dimensions:
6.90(w) x 9.60(h) x 0.60(d)

Meet the Author

Larry Silverberg received his PhD in engineering mechanics from Virginia Polytechnic Institute in 1983. In 1995 he was awarded a professorship in mechanical and aerospace engineering at North Carolina State University, a post he still holds today. He is the author of some 50 journal articles, a mechanics book, and teaches classes on field theory to students in engineering and the applied sciences. Professor Silverberg's primary research interests lie in field theory and dynamical systems.Larry Silverberg received his PhD in engineering mechanics from the Virginia Polytechnic Institute in 1983 and in 1995 was awarded a professorship in mechanical and aerospace engineering at North Carolina State University, a post he still holds today. He is the author of some 50 articles and one book, and has developed two graduate courses, teaching classes on field dynamics to students in engineering and the applied sciences.
Professor Silverberg's primary research interests currently lie in field dynamics and the control of dynamical systems.

Read More

Table of Contents

Preface IX

1 4DSpace 1

1.1 Convention 1

1.2 Cartesian Coordinates 2

1.3 Time as a Fourth Dimension 5

1.3.1 Images 5

1.3.2 Complex Numbers 6

1.3.3 The Temporal Coordinate x4 8

1.4 The Hypercube 9

1.5 The 4D Right-hand Rule 11

1.5.1 The Right-hand Indices 13

1.6 Exercises 14

2 Relativity 17

2.1 Transformations 17

2.2 Pure Rotations 19

2.3 The Lorentz Transformation 19

2.4 Historical Note about the Confusion Surrounding the Meaning of Time 22

2.5 Exercises 23

3 Energy 27

3.1 Energy Density Field A 27

3.2 Directional Derivative of A 28

3.3 Gradient Vector S 29

3.4 Energy Density Field Vector A 30

3.5 Exercises 31

4 Change 33

4.1 Component Gradient Vector Gi 33

4.2 Curvature Vector k 34

4.3 The Electrical and Mechanical Parts of dA/ds 35

4.4 3D Space 36

4.5 Summary 38

4.6 Exercises 38

5 Governing Equations 41

5.1 2D Field Lines 42

5.1.1 Comment on Bifurcations 43

5.1.2 The Differential Form 44

5.2 3D Field Lines 45

5.3 4D Field Lines 46

5.4 The Field Lines of Gi 47

5.5 Uniqueness 49

5.6 Exercises 51

6 Waves 53

6.1 Wave Superposition 53

6.2 Rectangular Waves 54

6.3 Spherical Waves 55

6.4 Initial Value Problem 56

6.4.1 Stiffness 57

6.4.2 Damping 59

7 Particles 61

7.1 The Stationary Field Particle 61

7.2 The Moving Field Particle 63

7.3 The Flux of a Field Particle 63

7.4 A Particle Exciting Another Field 65

7.5 Particle Motion at Nonrelativistic Speeds 67

7.6 Exercises 68

8 Electrodynamics 71

8.1 Maxwell’s Equations in Differential Form 71

8.2 Maxwell’s Equations in Integral Form 74

8.3 Polarization 78

8.3.1 3D Polarization 80

8.4 The Lorentz Force 80

8.5 Exercises 81

9 Mechanics 83

9.1 Noncoincident Observation 83

9.2 Particle Interaction 85

9.3 Newton’s Second Law 87

9.4 Note About the Effect of Charge 88

9.5 Inverse Square Laws 89

9.5.1 Purely Electrical Behavior 89

9.5.2 Purely Mechanical Behavior 90

9.6 Relativistic Mass 91

10 Essay: An Evolving Science 93

10.1 The Past 93

10.1.1 Early Period 93

10.1.2 Force 94

10.1.3 Energy 96

10.2 The Present 96

10.2.1 The Starting Point 97

10.2.2 Four-dimensional Space 97

10.2.3 Energy in 4D Space is a Continuum 98

10.2.4 The Particle is Itself an Idealized Field 99

10.2.5 Mechanics and Electrodynamics are Parts of How Energy Changes 99

10.3 The Future 100

10.3.1 Scientific Impact 100

10.3.2 Human Impact 102

10.4 Closing Message about Scales of Observation 104

Appendix A: Integral Theorems 107

A.1 Longitudinal Integral Theorems 107

A.1.1 Circulation 107

A.1.2 Curl 109

A.1.3 Coil 111

A.2 Transverse Integral Theorems 112

A.2.1 Flux and Divergence 112

A.2.2 Strength and Dilatation 113

Appendix B: Curvilinear Coordinates 117

B.1 Principles 117

B.2 Integral Theorems 119

B.2.1 Circulation and Curl 119

B.2.2 Coil 119

B.2.3 Flux and Divergence 120

B.2.4 Strength and Dilatation 121

B.3 Continuity Equations 122

B.4 Circular Coordinates 123

B.4.1 Polar Coordinates 123

B.4.2 Cylindrical Coordinates 123

B.4.3 Spherical Coordinates 124

B.4.4 Hyperpolar Coordinates 125

B.4.5 Hypercylindrical Coordinates 125

B.4.6 Hyperspherical Coordinates 126

B.5 Exercises 127

Solutions to Exercises 135

References 177

Index 179

Read More

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >