The Unincorporated Man (Unincorporated Series #1) [NOOK Book]

Overview


The Unincorporated Man is a provocative social/political/economic novel that takes place in the future, after civilization has fallen into complete economic collapse. This reborn civilization is one in which every individual is incorporated at birth, and spends many years trying to attain control over his or her own life by getting a majority of his or her own shares. Life extension has made life very long indeed.

Now the incredible has ...

See more details below
The Unincorporated Man (Unincorporated Series #1)

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook - First Edition)
$9.99
BN.com price

Overview


The Unincorporated Man is a provocative social/political/economic novel that takes place in the future, after civilization has fallen into complete economic collapse. This reborn civilization is one in which every individual is incorporated at birth, and spends many years trying to attain control over his or her own life by getting a majority of his or her own shares. Life extension has made life very long indeed.

Now the incredible has happened: a billionaire businessman from our time, frozen in secret in the early twenty-first century, is discovered and resurrected, given health and a vigorous younger body. Justin Cord is the only unincorporated man in the world, a true stranger in this strange land. Justin survived because he is tough and smart. He cannot accept only part ownership of himself, even if that places him in conflict with a civilization that extends outside the solar system to the Oort Cloud.  People will be arguing about this novel and this world for decades.


At the publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management software (DRM) applied.


Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

Fans of SF as a vehicle for ideas will devour this intriguing debut. Brilliant 21st-century tycoon Justin Cord is brought from cryogenic storage into a 24th-century society where people own stock in one another, safeguarding each other's welfare only out of economic self-interest. This is anathema to the defiantly individualistic Cord, who soon becomes a danger to the corporations that control the world and a symbol of freedom to the downtrodden penny-stock people. Cord's conversations with friends and enemies fill most of the book, alongside lectures on the mechanisms of the incorporated culture. The Kollin brothers keep the plot moving briskly despite the high proportion of talk to action. Their cerebral style will especially appeal to readers nostalgic for science fiction's early years. (Apr.)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Library Journal

After the world's economic collapse, civilization requires the incorporation of every individual at birth. Most people spend most of their lives gaining control of the majority of their own shares. The arrival of a cryogenically preserved man from the 21st century-who's obviously unincorporated-creates a social anomaly. The Kollin brothers' first novel, chosen as a Sci Fi Essential Book, recalls the emphasis on freedom of the early works of Heinlein and the cutting-edge social commentary of William Gibson and Fritz Lieber. A good choice for most libraries.


—Jackie Cassada
From the Publisher
Praise for The Unincorporated Man:

"Will appeal to Heinlein's legions of fans with its themes of personal liberty and one man's political struggle with the State. . . .  The Unincorporated Man will tantalize you in with its intriguing premise.”

—i09

"Reminiscent of Heinlein—a good, old-fashioned, enormously appealing SF yarn.  Bravo!"

—Robert J. Sawyer, Nebula Award-winning author of Rollback

“The Kollin brothers' first novel . . . recalls the emphasis on freedom of the early works of Heinlein and the cutting-edge social commentary of William Gibson and Fritz Lieber.”

—Library Journal

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781429968287
  • Publisher: Tom Doherty Associates
  • Publication date: 4/27/2010
  • Series: Unincorporated Series , #1
  • Sold by: Macmillan
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 496
  • Sales rank: 172,490
  • File size: 576 KB

Meet the Author


Dani Kollin lives in Los Angeles, California.  Eytan Kollin lives in Pasadena, California. They are brothers, and this is their first novel.


Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt


Chapter One

 

Look What I Found

Though he was filthy from head to toe, bloodied, and his skin shredded as thoroughly as a cat's scratching post, Omad couldn't suppress a grin. He was a miner with a knack for finding veins of valuable material even in old, worked-out quarries, and he felt in his bones that today was his day. Today he'd find something valuable enough to achieve his dream, and achieve it at the respectably early age of sixty-nine. His stock was selling for 183 credits a share, and all he needed was one more good find and GCI would owe him enough credits to enable him to buy a majority of himself. Even if his stock price rose, as was often the case with personal success, he could still make majority. He'd just have to pray that his personal valuation wouldn't go over 200 credits a share, and that he'd take home at least 20,000 credits from this venture. Yes, Omad was 100 shares away from controlling himself. He could taste it. The thought of being able to choose his own vacation times and consume what ever substance he wanted, when he wanted, almost made him too excited to work. But he quelled his feelings of joy and concentrated on the task at hand.

He was walking into a mine on GCI's property that hadn't been worked in centuries, and he was walking in without a corporation mine car or drill-bot. The less of GCI's equipment he used, the less of a percentage they'd be able to claim of his profits. It wasn't the norm, and he'd never have been as successful without corporate sponsorship and equipment, but this was different. Though it might take a little longer, this excavation would have to be done carefully and in person. Maximum allowable risk for maximum profit, and the risks were real.

Still, it was in these old mines that sometimes one got lucky. The technology of mineral extraction had improved greatly in the four centuries since this quarry had been actively worked. More important, the science of mineral transmutation had been born, and some metals were easier to transform from one into another. Many a decrepit lead mine had been reopened to turn its once worthless innards into a marketable commodity. And when this one was closed and forgotten in the late 1800s, it was done so out of prudence. It had been stripped bare, and there was simply no point in keeping it open any longer. What ever possible riches lay in waiting now, Omad was sure of one thing—he would be the first to find them.

He took his time with the mine scan. Impatience might make him miss something, and even walls as old as these left hundreds of chemical and structural clues. Know before you go, he reminded himself. The first part of the morning was spent insuring that the caverns were sound. He need not have worried. The mountain was formed of igneous rock—a type of hardened molten lava that had lasted eons and would last for eons more. By the time Omad finished his tests he was convinced the dig was stable. His safety assured, he now began looking for the telltale clues of wealth—wealth that could be shared with his investors, his employers, and himself. If he was right about this place, all would benefit from the investment that individuals and society had made in him—as it should be. Omad would also be pleased to gain 51 percent of himself, which was also as it should be.

His thoughts were interrupted and his dreams almost shattered by what appeared before him—a tunnel shaft in abject disarray. It was blocked by a few large boulders among hundreds of smaller shards in all shapes and sizes. What had he missed? The sight of such instability alone almost made him turn back and choose a new mine. He had just conjectured that this one would last eons, and now here was proof that it was coming down a lot sooner than expected. Clearly a malfunction on the part of his hardware, he reasoned. Perhaps a costly one. But his years of experience told him what he already knew: The type of rock he'd ventured into didn't need a reader to give up its history—only to verify it. He would exchange the mine-reader when he returned. But against his better judgment, or perhaps because of it, he decided to venture a little farther.

There was something here and he knew it. Plus, he was driven by his personal mantra, "Little risk, little profit," so he bent to examine the crumbled evidence before him. Explosives, he realized, upon examining the shards. Not a "natural" cave in after all. More evidence lay in Omad's path. What ever, or more precisely, whoever had made this mess had left the detonator, some primitive blasting caps, and humorously, an instruction manual on how to set off explosives in a mine. Since no skeleton or evidence of a body was visible, the perpetrator had obviously read the manual well, done the deed, and exited to safety. There was also a box of something called "Twinkies." Omad picked it up and examined it carefully. Aside from its unique and unusual artwork, he was able to discern its key ingredients as well as something called an "EXP" date, which was marked from an eleventh month in what appeared to be the early twenty-first century. This was starting to get interesting. He gathered all the wrappers and placed them in an airtight container, along with the manual and blasting caps he had so far collected. Omad loved a mystery, and judging from the leftover wrappers, whoever blasted this tunnel had time to eat at least twenty-eight of these Twinkie things and walk out in one piece. Must have been some kind of nutritional energy snack, he thought, as he cracked his knuckles and continued on deeper into the shaft. The dry, consistent atmosphere had preserved the scene almost as if the long-gone blaster had left just before Omad had arrived. Even if he couldn't make a profit out of what was buried in the tunnel, he might just make a profit from what he'd just discovered outside of it. The nutritional wrappers and blaster manual alone would fetch a very good price on the open relic market. No, even if he found nothing else, today would not be a loss by any stretch of the imagination.

Neela Harper was not a country girl. In fact, she'd always preferred the big city. Anything with only a million and a half people in it just didn't seem natural. If she had had any inkling that the career she had chosen for herself would dump her in this remote part of the world she probably wouldn't have chosen it. Then again, being a minority shareholder in herself, she would have had little or no say whatsoever about her place of employ. Luck of the draw, she thought somberly to herself. And this year I'm clearly down on my luck. Anybody looking at her would not be displeased. She was five feet eleven inches—about average for a woman. A very healthy thirty-seven, but this was not surprising in the era of nano-medicine; positively everyone was healthy, and everyone looked great. Still, if everybody was a giant health-wise, then Neela, by her rigorous adherence to exercise, stood on the shoulders of those giants. Her appearance was 97 percent original, with only minor changes to control her hair growth and the removal of some facial bone damage suffered in a childhood accident. She hadn't had a sex change or so much as a boob job by her eighteenth birthday, something that was practically a rite of passage for her generation. Nope, just chestnut hair, green eyes, a tiny nose, freckles, and a supremely athletic body. Her problem was not so much physical as it was economic.

Not knowing what she wanted to do with her life, she spent all of high school and most of college studying t

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 67 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(38)

4 Star

(18)

3 Star

(6)

2 Star

(4)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 67 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 13, 2012

    Not worth it.

    If you don't like to think about the glaring holes in the plot or how the main character just a big d#@k as the society he is fighting this book is awesome. If you actually read the words and can comprehend them you will want to stab your eyeballs out of your head.

    2 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2012

    Wow!

    The story grabbed me and didn't let go until I finished. I usually dislike dystopia tales, but this was better than average. I look forward to reading the sequel.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 4, 2011

    Best book I've read in a long time...

    The Kollin brothers have managed to bring together an amalgamation of science fiction, philosophy and an allegory for the American Revolution in grand, operatic style. Cliche' but I couldn't put it down.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 7, 2012

    Some interesting ideas in search of a novel. There is a Heinlei

    Some interesting ideas in search of a novel. There is a Heinleinesque hint of simple-minded social commentary coupled with a lot of gee-whiz future tech (flying cars!), but the point of the whole exercise is never really made clear, possibly because the central premise -- personal incorporation -- is never adequately explained. Eventually the book devolves into power-mad corporate villian against the hero of free men everywhere, and frankly that's been done much better in the past then it is here.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 10, 2011

    Excellent

    No words except scary, amazing, and... possible.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 2, 2011

    Held me late into the niht!

    Truly a gripping story with well woven characters and plots. Fantastic!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 1, 2011

    "Things are looking up"

    A plausable look at the future where our own self interest is directed at solving societies troubles. At times scary, but a great read. Science fiction at its best!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 9, 2011

    Scary and amazing look into the future

    I bought this book in hardcover when it came out, and then bought the second book in the series on my nook. Both books were fantastic, and I highly recommend them. Each is a thrilling look into a possible future; mixing the gripping, edge if your seat action, with excellent character development and space opera style drama.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 15, 2011

    Loved it!

    This is one of those books along the lines of 1984, The Hunger Games, and Ayn Rand's novels that presents a political and social system that is nothing short of scary. It's one of those terrifying what-ifs that like the others is certainly not outside the realm of possibility. After-all, we have seen much worse actually occur both past and present. This one is a great story, with great characters, in an interesting time seen at society's tipping point of deciding whether to continue and deepen their slavery to the very few in power or to set themselves free.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 24, 2010

    Science fiction set in the future and surrounded by the human condition.

    The unincorporated man is one of the most interesting books that I have read in some time. Once I started reading it, I just could not put it down. The authors bring you into this future world, all the while, giving you everything you need to believe it could be real. The characters are full of life and fleshed out. It is SYFY without being too weird. I am half way through the follow on book "The Unincorporated War" which has the same style of plausible writing. If you like the human struggle, romance, technology, war, politics, etc. read both of the books.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 9, 2013

    Aewsome

    I read from three pm to four am when I first got this

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 7, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    An Instant Classic! One of the Best SciFi Reads Out There!

    If Isaac Asimov and Ayn Rand were still alive today and teamed up, this would be the magnificient work they would pen together. In a world three hundred years into the future, all individuals are incorporated, meaning that at birth share of stock are created for the individual. Throughout that person's life, others will own a piece of that person and will take a personal interest in that person's well-being. This will ensure that the owner of those shares has a maximum rate of return.

    In this world, poverty is non-existant and if an indivdual works hard enough and is frugal, they are able to by enough of their personal stock to reach a majority ownership. Once majority is attained, the individual has freedom to choose the life they want.


    Justin Cord does not believe in this system. He is a man born in the 20th century, awakened from cryogenetic sleep in this future "Utopian" society. Justin battles the idea of becomming "incorporated" choosing instead to remain a "free" man. There are those in the future that consider Justin the most dangerous man on the planet, especially Hecktor Sambianco, one of the top members of GCI, the top global corporation.

    Justin has those who help him from his personal physician Neela, the man who discovers Justin, Omad, and Justin's personal avatar, Sebastian. Justin must battle Hecktor to prevent becomming incorporated and keep the ideals he believes in.

    In this magnificiently penned novel, there are a lot of things that ring true with today's current events from the financial crisis to how much wealth does an individual have the right to keep, people being forever indebted to credit card companies and the idea that smaller government is better.

    This is one of the best SciFi reads I have come upon in a long time and should not be missed!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 21, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    One book you don't want to miss..............

    I am not into sci-fi books at all, I usually don 't read them, but this book was very very good!! I am sure there will be a sequel and I will be watching for it. For this author's first book he did a extremely nice job and can't wait to see what esle he writes. Mb

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 25, 2009

    AN AMAZING ENGROSSING READ!

    I don't usually like sci fi. But this isn't sci fi in the normal mode. It's a commentary on the economy of today along with just an astounding, engrossing story. I literally couldn't put it down. I can't wait for part two of the trilogy.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 24, 2009

    Thrilling Read!

    One of those books you just can't put down but from which you realized you have learned a lot when you turn the last page. Thought-provoking and powerful!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 5, 2009

    Best Realistic Science Fiction in Decades

    This is probably the most authentic science fiction book in the last few decades. In many respects it reminds me of Robert Heinlein's, "Stranger in a Strange Land". The authors create a society with a totally different sociological, economics, and political systems. Then the authors attempt explain the failure of our current systems and the reasons for the rise of their proposed system. They also propose futuristic transportation, communication and medical advances and try to explain them.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 19, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    This is an intriguing science fiction thriller

    In the early twenty-first century, multi-billionaire Justin Cord learns he suffers from an untreatable cancer; he will die soon. A battler all his life, Justin battles for his life; betting on the future. He has a cryogenic burial home built and has himself put on ice inside it.<BR/><BR/>A few centuries into the future, Justin¿s frozen home is discovered. He is thawed out and his body healed. However, Justin learns that he is THE UNINCORPORATED MAN in a radically differing economic system than the one he made his fortune in. That collapsed in spite of humanity reaching as far away as the Oort Cloud, the outer rim of the sun¿s gravitational pull. At birth, a person is incorporated; they spend years trying to buy controlling interest in his or her self. For Justin this means he is owned by a corporation and starting very late to buy himself. As he did with death he rejects the concept of he owning a limited share of himself while others own the majority share.<BR/><BR/>This is an intriguing science fiction thriller that extrapolates the current economic trends of free market and total privatization (Bush legacy meltdowns) into a future in which a person is owned like an indentured servant only by corporate shareholders. Thus the Kollin brothers shine a deep spotlight on a DNA like matrix interweaving acceptable societal norm with the economy. The story line is thought provoking on several fronts starting with the economy, the government and the technology that has taken mankind across the solar system. Justin is a throwback to an earlier age before the corporations bought power as he believes strongly in freedom, which he feels the shareholders thwart. Fans who enjoy an exciting twenty-forth century thriller with roots in today¿s global economy will appreciate this deep tale.<BR/><BR/>Harriet Klausner

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 30, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 18, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 28, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 67 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)