The Unincorporated War (Unincorporated Series #2) [NOOK Book]

Overview


The Kollin brothers introduced their future world, and central character Justin Cord, in The Unincorporated Man. Justin created a revolution in that book, and is now exiled from Earth to the outer planets, where he is an heroic figure.

The corporate society which is headquartered on Earth and rules Venus, Mars, and the Orbital colonies, wants to destroy Justin and reclaim hegemony over the rebellious outer planets. The first ...

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The Unincorporated War (Unincorporated Series #2)

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Overview


The Kollin brothers introduced their future world, and central character Justin Cord, in The Unincorporated Man. Justin created a revolution in that book, and is now exiled from Earth to the outer planets, where he is an heroic figure.

The corporate society which is headquartered on Earth and rules Venus, Mars, and the Orbital colonies, wants to destroy Justin and reclaim hegemony over the rebellious outer planets. The first interplanetary civil war begins as the military fleet of Earth attacks.  Filled with battles, betrayals, and triumphs, The Unincorporated War is a full-scale space opera that catapults the focus of the earlier novel up and out into the solar system. Justin remains both a logical and passionate fighter for the principles that motivate him, and remains the most dangerous man alive.


At the publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management software (DRM) applied.


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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

Fans of SF as a vehicle for ideas will devour this intriguing debut. Brilliant 21st-century tycoon Justin Cord is brought from cryogenic storage into a 24th-century society where people own stock in one another, safeguarding each other's welfare only out of economic self-interest. This is anathema to the defiantly individualistic Cord, who soon becomes a danger to the corporations that control the world and a symbol of freedom to the downtrodden penny-stock people. Cord's conversations with friends and enemies fill most of the book, alongside lectures on the mechanisms of the incorporated culture. The Kollin brothers keep the plot moving briskly despite the high proportion of talk to action. Their cerebral style will especially appeal to readers nostalgic for science fiction's early years. (Apr.)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Library Journal

After the world's economic collapse, civilization requires the incorporation of every individual at birth. Most people spend most of their lives gaining control of the majority of their own shares. The arrival of a cryogenically preserved man from the 21st century-who's obviously unincorporated-creates a social anomaly. The Kollin brothers' first novel, chosen as a Sci Fi Essential Book, recalls the emphasis on freedom of the early works of Heinlein and the cutting-edge social commentary of William Gibson and Fritz Lieber. A good choice for most libraries.


—Jackie Cassada
From the Publisher

“Appealing characters, ruthless villains, and speed-of-light pacing make this a good choice for fans of battle-oriented sf and heroic space adventure in the tradition of Robert Heinlein and David Weber.”
—Library Journal on The Unincorporated War

“The Kollins’s masterful command of multiple plot threads, characters, and the motifs of grand-scale space opera make for a breathtaking sequel.”
—Booklist on The Unincorporated War

“Reminiscent of Heinlein—a good, old-fashioned, enormously appealing SF yarn. Bravo!”
—Robert J. Sawyer, Hugo Award–winning author of Rollback, on The Unincorporated Man

Library Journal
Permanently exiled from Earth after creating a revolution against its corporate tyranny, Justin Cord now serves as President of the Outer Alliance. His rule is uneasy, however, as Earth's military fleet of starships launches an all-out war against its rivals, forcing Justin to continue his battle for what he believes is right. The brothers Kollin fill their sequel to The Unincorporated Man with space battles, political intrigue, and all the makings of a first-rate space opera. VERDICT Appealing characters, ruthless villains, and speed-of-light pacing make this a good choice for fans of battle-oriented sf and heroic space adventure in the tradition of Robert Heinlein and David Weber.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781429935364
  • Publisher: Tom Doherty Associates
  • Publication date: 5/11/2010
  • Series: Unincorporated Series , #2
  • Sold by: Macmillan
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 464
  • Sales rank: 180,083
  • File size: 574 KB

Meet the Author


Dani Kollin lives in Los Angeles, California and Eytan Kollin lives in Pasadena, California. They are brothers, and this is their second novel.


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Read an Excerpt


1
Calm Before the Storm

Justin Cord drifted on his back, arms clasped loosely behind his head, admir-Jing the delicate mist moving slowly above. It was through these thin wisps of vapor and the eerily warm water .owing quietly beneath him that he would, on that rare occasion, .nd solace in a lake so big he would have called it a sea. He’d long gotten used to the fact that the horizon line curved upwards instead of down and that instead of a clear blue sky his vista was that of a magni.cent mountain range above. The inverse horizon was just one of the many oddities he’d had to struggle with by virtue of his forced exile to the belt. He  couldn’t help it. When he thought “asteroid”, “small” came to mind. After all, Ceres was only a quarter the size of Earth’s Moon. What he failed to realize was just how huge the Moon ac­tually was. Of course Ceres had changed quite a bit as a result of the planetoid’s .rst meddlesome settlers. Its orbit had been altered to match that of Mars in or­der to bring it into the elliptic plane along with all the other major bodies in the solar system. On top of that, the Cerians had dug down deep and  were still dig­ging. They’d hollowed out a  two- mile- wide cylindrical hole through the center and then gave the rock spin for gravity. The early inhabitants had also taken abundant advantage of the fact that their home had miles of frozen water spread evenly beneath its surface. In fact, it had more H20 than all the freshwater on Earth. This meant that Ceres had lakes, lots of them, with some as big as oceans. And so drifting aimlessly a hundred meters from shore, staring down into the planet, Justin Cord could almost forget that there was a ceiling “behind” him holding in the massive body of water and that the power of centrifugal force ensured that it stayed that way. For most born in the belt and accustomed to subterranean life, the idea of a sky was unnerving to say the least. Justin had heard stories of some belt- born with agoraphobia so severe that they wouldn’t dare venture outside on Earth unless they were safely con.ned within the  sterile- aired, cumbersome embrace of a space suit. Since he’d never seen such a thing, he chalked it up to talk. Still, after being on Ceres for little over a year he could certainly relate. In space you weren’t safe until you had a secure roof over your head, and even then you’d al­ways check for leaks. For an off- worlder visiting Earth for the .rst time, the  whole damned planet leaked.
With the new President of the Outer Alliance, the feeling was just the oppo­site. Try as he might, Justin  couldn’t help but feel closed in. He hid it as best he could and took long walks in the great city parks where the “roof ” was far enough overhead that he wouldn’t notice the absence of sky. Time permitting, he’d sometimes wander into the forest where the trees  were so tall and crowns so thick that he could imagine he was in a forest somewhere on Earth. But the thing Justin best loved to do was swim. He could forget where he was, forget all his problems as well as everyone  else’s. Arm over arm, head back, Justin would some­times think that if there  were a heaven it had to be an endless ocean he could spend eternity swimming in.
But as usual, heaven would have to wait. Justin could make out the  all- too-familiar hum of a hover disk approaching in the distance. It was a sound that elicited an almost Pavlovian response. The President sighed, continued his poor backstroke, and waited patiently to open his eyes until the craft was practically on top of him. It had gotten to the point that he no longer bothered to swim back to shore. He knew something would always happen that would necessitate a disk being sent out to get him. One day, he decided, there would be no emergency at all, no crisis, no feathers to be unruf.ed, and on that day he would probably drown. But that day was not today. After another hundred yards of backstroking to put off the inevitable, he gave up, stopped, and opened his eyes.
Omad was smiling down on him.
“You know I  wouldn’t have come out if—”
“Yeah, yeah, yeah. Let me guess,” said Justin. “They found a monolith .oating around Jupiter. Alien contact perhaps, no, maybe Mars revolted and joined the Outer Alliance.”
“No monoliths,” answered Omad, “not for lack of looking, mind you, but none yet. And any aliens smart enough to get into this neck of the galaxy would probably be smart enough to get out. And if Mars decided to join us,” Omad said, looking out into the distance, “it  wouldn’t make sense to call us the Outer Al­liance then, would it?” He then looked back down to Justin.“We would just be the Alliance, don’t you think? Mars is a core world after all.”
“Not in my day.”
“You’re a really old fart, Justin. Nothing is from your day.”
Justin laughed. “OK, Omad,” said the President, noticing his friend’s pained expression. “What is it this time?”
“It’s Eris, friend. Everyone’s waiting back at Cliff House.”
Justin was suddenly tired in a way that had nothing to do with the miles he’d just logged in swimming.
“Crap.”
Omad nodded sympathetically and then extended his hand, .rst making sure to get a good grip on the strap in the center of the disk. The machine tilted slightly as Justin got on, but no more than three or four degrees. Omad tossed his friend a towel and without another word sped off toward the shore, where the world Justin had only recently created sat waiting.
“OK, listeners, this is The Clara Roberts Show coming to you live from Ceres for the .rst day of the provisional congress. By mutual agree­ment, no press or recording devices are allowed into the actual hall, but the delegates are always coming and going. Why,  here’s Tyler Sadma of the Eris colony about to enter the hall. Let me see if I can just ask him to talk to us....Mr. Sadma...Mr. Sadma! A few words for the... Mr. Sadma . . .”
“No comment.”
“I am sorry, loyal listeners, but he pushed right past me. Seems his reputation is well deserved. Wait a minute . . . here comes Karen Cho of the Oberon colony. Miss Cho!”
“Hello, Clara, love your show. We listen to it on Saturn all the time.”
“Thanks for the plug.”
“Well sure, you guys always have a good slant about news from the corporate core. Lots of facts without all the Terran propaganda.”
“We try to keep the truth broadcasting for all to hear. You could help my listeners by telling me what’s going on behind the closed doors of power.”
“Clara, before we could have that power we’d all have to agree.”
“Agree on what?”
“Anything; I’m not sure we can even order lunch as a congress with­
out calling a committee of the  whole, and by the time we do agree it would be time for breakfast!” “And I though my job was tough! Miss Cho, got time for another
question?” “Sure.” “Any chance the First Free will show up on opening day?” “He says he  doesn’t want to interfere with the formation of the leg­
islative branch until  we’re all settled in and invite him. And surely, Miss Roberts, you know the provisional President does not encourage the use of that nickname.”
“It’s what all my listeners call him. Who am I to argue?” “Well, just don’t say it to his f
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 30 )
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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 30 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 18, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    This sequel to the Unincorporated Man is a fast-paced military science fiction.

    The Unincorporated Man Jason Cord led a rebellion against the tyranny of corporations that ruled the solar system. His revolt partially succeeded as the Outer Alliance broke free of the inner planets who remain mindlessly controlled by the corporations. Jason becomes the president of the OA, but knows he will never return to earth where he is an outlaw.

    Fearing the rebellion widening and believing the outer planets are colonies, Earth dispatches its starship armada to destroy the breakaway alliance. Jason knows his side is in trouble as the enemy is much more powerful and feels remorse that he sends soldiers to die, but refuses to surrender. Instead he sends a counter force to battle the enemy's militia.

    This sequel to the Unincorporated Man is a fast-paced military science fiction. With a lot more solar system space battles and much less political intrigue than its predecessor, The Unincorporated war is action-packed throughout, but lacks the nuances of extrapolating trends from today's corporate-political-judicial (since Citizen United decision) complex. Still this is a top rate outer space thriller.

    Harriet Klausner

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 18, 2011

    A well done book in a futuristic solar system spanning format.

    I do not remember what drew me to this book, though it may have been the description. It was well written and drew me in with ease. There are familiar themes that anyone who has been into reading this kind of story will recognize; but it does not simply borrow and regurgitate. There's warfare, intrigue, deception, and more. I found it to be a very enjoyable read. And while I wouldn't give it a five star rating, it deserves a full four in my mind.

    The characters are believable, realistic, and quite human for the most part. A must read, no. A good read and worth the time, definitely.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 22, 2011

    Poor plot and sloppy writing

    I slugged through "The Unincorporated Man" and decided to see if the authors would be able to take a great premise and make a decent novel. It has been nearly a month and I have yet to get through half of the book. What makes this such a poor product is that the character development is shoddy. It is as if these two novels are written for adolescents. Not recommended.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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