United States Hegemony and the Foundations of International Law

United States Hegemony and the Foundations of International Law

by Michael Byers, Georg Nolte
     
 

ISBN-10: 0521050863

ISBN-13: 9780521050869

Pub. Date: 01/21/2008

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

Twelve leading scholars of international law and international relations consider whether the current strength of the United States is leading to change in the international legal system. This book demonstrates that the effects of U.S. domination of the foundations of international law are real, but also intensely complex. The volume stimulates debate about the role…  See more details below

Overview

Twelve leading scholars of international law and international relations consider whether the current strength of the United States is leading to change in the international legal system. This book demonstrates that the effects of U.S. domination of the foundations of international law are real, but also intensely complex. The volume stimulates debate about the role of the United States in international law and interests scholars of international law and international relations, government officials and international organizations.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780521050869
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Publication date:
01/21/2008
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
552
Product dimensions:
5.98(w) x 8.98(h) x 1.22(d)

Table of Contents

List of contributors
Preface
Introduction: the complexities of foundational change1
1The international community, international law, and the United States: three in one, two against one, or one and the same?25
2The influence of the United States on the concept of the "International Community"57
3Comments on chapters 1 and 291
4Sovereign equality - "the Wimbledon sails on"117
5More equal than the rest? Hierarchy, equality and US predominance in international law135
6Comments on chapters 4 and 5176
7The use of force by the United States after the end of the Cold War, and its impact on international law197
8Bending the law, breaking it, or developing it? The United States and the humanitarian use of force in the post-Cold War era232
9Comments on chapters 7 and 8264
10Powerful but unpersuasive? The role of the United States in the evolution of customary international law287
11Hegemonic custom?317
12Comments on chapters 10 and 11348
13The effects of US predominance on the elaboration of treaty regimes and on the evolution of the law of treaties363
14US reservations to human rights treaties: all for one and none for all?392
15Comments on chapters 13 and 14416
16The impact on international law of US noncompliance427
17Compliance: multilateral achievements and predominant powers456
18Comments on chapters 16 and 17477
Conclusion491
Index515

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