The Universal Baseball Association, Inc., J. Henry Waugh, Prop.

The Universal Baseball Association, Inc., J. Henry Waugh, Prop.

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by Robert Coover
     
 

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His name is J. Henry Waugh. He eats delicatessen, drinks in a neighborhood bar, picks up B-girls, and likes country music. But he has one strange obsession. He has devised a baseball game whose every action is determined by a throw of the dice. He is the nighttime proprietor of the Universal Baseball Association, its master and its slave. Robert Coover uses… See more details below

Overview

His name is J. Henry Waugh. He eats delicatessen, drinks in a neighborhood bar, picks up B-girls, and likes country music. But he has one strange obsession. He has devised a baseball game whose every action is determined by a throw of the dice. He is the nighttime proprietor of the Universal Baseball Association, its master and its slave. Robert Coover uses baseball and its almost perfect balance between offense and defense to explore the texture of American life and myth. In doing so, he has created a comic masterpiece.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780452260306
Publisher:
Penguin Group (USA)
Publication date:
05/28/1971
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
256
Product dimensions:
5.40(w) x 8.12(h) x 0.59(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher

Praise for The work of Robert Coover:

"Robert Coover is one of the most original and exciting writers around. Every new book from him is great news." --Edwidge Danticat, McSweeney's

"Coover adds his dazzling two bits to the deconstructionist turf Paul Auster prowled in The New York Trilogy." --Publishers Weekly, Starred Review

"[A] brilliant parody of noir and hardboiled fiction and film." --Michael Lipkin, New York Journal of Books

"Right from the start the book nearly matches On the Road for sheer electricity . . . Coover made baseball on the page seem three-dimensional, exulting in what he called the game's 'almost perfect balance between offense and defense.' He captured what Philip Roth, in a 1973 New York Times essay on baseball, called 'its longueurs and thrills, its spaciousness, its suspensefulness, its heroics, its nuances, its lingo, its'characters,' its peculiarly hypnotic tedium'. . . The genius of the novel is in how Coover revels in the sun-bright vitality of the world Waugh has created, full of drink and lust and dirty limericks and doubles down the line -- and yet brings Waugh face to face with its darkest truths." --The New York Times Book Review

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