The University and the People: Envisioning American Higher Education in an Era of Populist Protest [NOOK Book]

Overview

The University and the People chronicles the influence of Populism—a powerful agrarian movement—on public higher education in the late nineteenth century. Revisiting this pivotal era in the history of the American state university, Scott Gelber demonstrates that Populists expressed a surprising degree of enthusiasm for institutions of higher learning. More fundamentally, he argues that the mission of the state university, as we understand it today, evolved from a fractious but ...

See more details below
The University and the People: Envisioning American Higher Education in an Era of Populist Protest

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$13.99
BN.com price
(Save 29%)$19.95 List Price

Overview

The University and the People chronicles the influence of Populism—a powerful agrarian movement—on public higher education in the late nineteenth century. Revisiting this pivotal era in the history of the American state university, Scott Gelber demonstrates that Populists expressed a surprising degree of enthusiasm for institutions of higher learning. More fundamentally, he argues that the mission of the state university, as we understand it today, evolved from a fractious but productive relationship between public demands and academic authority.
    Populists attacked a variety of elites—professionals, executives, scholars—and seemed to confirm academia’s fear of anti-intellectual public oversight. The movement’s vision of the state university highlighted deep tensions in American attitudes toward meritocracy and expertise. Yet Populists also promoted state-supported higher education, with the aims of educating the sons (and sometimes daughters) of ordinary citizens, blurring status distinctions, and promoting civic engagement. Accessibility, utilitarianism, and public service were the bywords of Populist journalists, legislators, trustees, and sympathetic professors. These “academic populists” encouraged state universities to reckon with egalitarian perspectives on admissions, financial aid, curricula, and research. And despite their critiques of college “ivory towers,” Populists supported the humanities and social sciences, tolerated a degree of ideological dissent, and lobbied for record-breaking appropriations for state institutions.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“Gelber shows that the farmer’s movement was not hostile to higher education, but that it wanted public colleges and universities to behave differently—favoring greater access for underprepared and underfunded students, a heightened emphasis on practical rather than theoretical education, greater responsiveness to public opinion, and social science education that reflected Populist understandings of political economy.”—David Danbom, author of The World of Hope: Progressives and the Struggle for an Ethical Public Life

“This well-written, well-organized, and well-argued book offers the first complete analysis of Populist influence on public higher education in the United States in the late nineteenth century.”—Adam R. Nelson, author of Education and Democracy

“This impressively researched, well-written first book breaks genuinely new ground in one of the most thoroughly studied areas in US history.”— CHOICE

“An invaluable contribution for all disciplines engaged in the study of education.”—John L. Thelin, Educational Researcher

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780299284633
  • Publisher: University of Wisconsin Press
  • Publication date: 9/28/2011
  • Series: Studies in American Thought and Culture
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 264
  • File size: 738 KB

Meet the Author

Scott M. Gelber is assistant professor of education and assistant professor of history (by courtesy) at Wheaton College in Norton, Massachusetts.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations   

Acknowledgments   

Introduction: Academic Populism   

1 Preludes to Populism: Anti-Elitism and Higher Education, 1820–1885   

2 Scaling the Gilded Halls of the University: Populism and Campus Politics   

3 The Greatest Good for the Greatest Number: Populism and Academic Access   

4 Looking Forward: Populism and Economic Access   

5 Producers and Parasites: The Populist Vision of College Curriculum   

6 The Tastes of the Multitude: Populism, Expertise, and Academic Freedom   

7 Watchdogs of the Treasury: Populism and Public Funding for Higher Education       

Conclusion   

Notes   

Index   

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)