The University of Cambridge: A New History

Overview

The intertwined story of the great English ""Varsity"" universities has many colorful aspects in common, yet also boasts elements of true originality. So while the histories of Oxford and Cambridge are both characterised by seething town and gown rivalries, doctrinal conflicts and heretical outbursts, shifts of political and religious allegiance and gripping stories of individual heroism and defiance, they are also narratives of difference and distinctiveness. G. R. Evans explores the remarkable and unique ...

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University of Cambridge, The: A New History

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Overview

The intertwined story of the great English ""Varsity"" universities has many colorful aspects in common, yet also boasts elements of true originality. So while the histories of Oxford and Cambridge are both characterised by seething town and gown rivalries, doctrinal conflicts and heretical outbursts, shifts of political and religious allegiance and gripping stories of individual heroism and defiance, they are also narratives of difference and distinctiveness. G. R. Evans explores the remarkable and unique contribution that Cambridge University has made to society and culture, both in Britain and right across the globe, and will subsequently publish her history of Oxford University to complete a major new history of the two universities. Ranging across 800 years of vivid history, packed with incident, Evans here explores great thinkers such as John Duns Scotus -- the 13th century Franciscan Friar who gave his name his name to ""dunces"" -- and celebrates the extraordinary molecular breakthroughs of Watson and Crick in the 20th century. Moving from the radical new thinking of the Cambridge Platonists and the brilliant scientific discoveries of Isaac Newton to the discovery of the Double Helix and the notorious ""Garden House Hotel Riot"" of 1970, the book is published to co-incide with the 800th anniversary of the University's foundation in 1209. The first short history of its kind, it will be a lasting and treasured resource for all Cambridge alumni/ae.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781848851153
  • Publisher: I. B.Tauris & Company, Limited
  • Publication date: 12/15/2009
  • Pages: 384
  • Product dimensions: 6.50 (w) x 9.40 (h) x 1.50 (d)

Meet the Author

G. R. Evans is Professor Emerita of Intellectual History and Medieval Theology in the University of Cambridge. She has written many well received books in the fields of history, the history of ideas and religion, and also serves as editor of the I.B.Tauris History of the Christian Church series.

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Table of Contents

* Preface
• Acknowledgements
• Cambridge in living memory: the last hundred years
• i. Where is the University?
• ii. Running their own show
• iii. Shall we let women in?
• iv. Meeting national needs: putting Cambridge in the spotlight
• v. The First World War and the spectre of state inspection again
• vi. Between the Wars
• vii. World War II and a new world for Cambridge
• viii Student revolution and eccentric dons: the swinging sixties
• ix. The Colleges and the University rethink their relationship
• x. Could Cambridge remain in a world of its own? *xi. Cambridge discovers ‘administration’
• xii. Cambridge’s academics lose their security
• xiii. A business-facing Cambridge?
• xiv. Intellectual property rights and academic freedoms
• xv. The capsize of CAPSA
• xv. So where are we now?
• How it all began
• i. Europe invents universities
• ii. How it all began in Cambridge
• iii. Student life: the beginning of colleges
• iii. What was it like to study for a degree in medieval Cambridge?
• iv. The Dunce and the dunces: Cambridge as a backwater
• Cambridge and the Tudor Revolution
• i. Margaret Beaumont and John Fisher turn Cambridge’s fortunes round
• ii. The world as Cambridge’s oyster
• iii. Cambridge joins the ‘Renaissance’
• iv. Erasmus, Luther and a ‘Reformation’ Cambridge
• iv. The Cambridge translators
• v. Visitations: the bid for state control of Cambridge
• vi. Edward VI and Cambridge
• vii. Queen Mary and the martyrs
• viii. Queen Elizabeth, Cambridge and protestant nationhood
• Seventeenth and eighteenth century Cambridge: puritans and scientists
• i. James I and Cambridge
• ii. Hybrid vigour
• iii. The Cambridge Platonists and the redrawing of the boundaries of theology
• iv. Cambridge adjusts the relationship between God and nature
• v. Isaac Newton: a Cambridge character in close-up
• vi. Cambridge ‘networking’ on the international scene
• vii. Puritan rigour, Civil War and Restoration
• viii. John Milton and new trends in Cambridge language study
• ix. From logic to experimental science
• x. Enlightenment or marking time?
• The nineteenth century transformation
• i. Students have fun
• ii. The early nineteenth century call for reform
• iii. Scientific research becomes an academic activity with industrial outreach
• iv. Forming the academic sciences and making them intellectually respectable
• v. The ‘learned societies’ adjust their standards
• vi. 'Call him a scientist'
• vii. Must science exclude theology?
• viii. Professorships and the emergence of academic specialization
• ix. Teaching: should new ‘useful ‘ subjects replace the classics?
• x. Cambridge reconsiders its duty to society: the long legacy of Prince Albert’s Chancellorship
• xi. Applying science: Cambridge and the industrial uses of university research
• xii. Widening access
• xiii. Entrances and exits
• xiv. Cambridge graduates: good men, good citizens
• xv. Enter the Cambridge University Reporter
• Conclusion
• Glossary
• Abbreviations
• Bibliography *

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