UNIX and Linux System Administration Handbook / Edition 4

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Overview

“As an author, editor, and publisher, I never paid much attention to the competition–except in a few cases. This is one of those cases. The UNIX System Administration Handbook is one of the few books we ever measured ourselves against.”

–From the Foreword by Tim O’Reilly, founder of O’Reilly Media

“This book is fun and functional as a desktop reference. If you use UNIX and Linux systems, you need this book in your short-reach library. It covers a bit of the systems’ history but doesn’t bloviate. It’s just straightfoward information delivered in colorful and memorable fashion.”

–Jason A. Nunnelley

“This is a comprehensive guide to the care and feeding of UNIX and Linux systems. The authors present the facts along with seasoned advice and real-world examples. Their perspective on the variations among systems is valuable for anyone who runs a heterogeneous computing facility.”

–Pat Parseghian

The twentieth anniversary edition of the world’s best-selling UNIX system administration book has been made even better by adding coverage of the leading Linux distributions: Ubuntu, openSUSE, and RHEL.

This book approaches system administration in a practical way and is an invaluable reference for both new administrators and experienced professionals. It details best practices for every facet of system administration, including storage management, network design and administration, email, web hosting, scripting, software configuration management, performance analysis, Windows interoperability, virtualization, DNS, security, management of IT service organizations, and much more. UNIX® and Linux® System Administration Handbook, Fourth Edition, reflects the current versions of these operating systems:

Ubuntu® Linux
openSUSE® Linux
Red Hat® Enterprise Linux®
Oracle America® Solaris™ (formerly Sun Solaris)
HP HP-UX®
IBM AIX®


The authors assume that you have a certain amount of UNIX experience; in particular, a general concept of how UNIX looks and feels from a user's perspective. From their own practical experiences the authors give you an overview of the major administrative systems, introduce general administrative techniques, help you choose solutions that will continue to work well as your site grows in size and complexity, summarize common procedures saving you the time of digging through the manuals to accomplish simple tasks. This book is designed to be a compliment to, not a replacement for your system's documentation. Encompassing everything from adding new users, troubleshooting, adding hardware, configuring the Kernel, communications/networking, the Internet, policy and politics. A most complete UNIX system administration book.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble

Fatbrain Review

The authors assume that you have a certain amount of UNIX experience; in particular, a general concept of how UNIX looks and feels from a user's perspective. From their own practical experiences the authors give you an overview of the major administrative systems, introduce general administrative techniques, help you choose solutions that will continue to work well as your site grows in size and complexity, summarize common procedures saving you the time of digging through the manuals to accomplish simple tasks. This book is designed to be a compliment to, not a replacement for your system's documentation. Encompassing everything from adding new users, troubleshooting, adding hardware, configuring the Kernel, communications/networking, the Internet, policy and politics. A most complete UNIX system administration book.
Booknews
First covers the techniques needed to run a stand-alone UNIX system, then describes the protocols used on UNIX systems and the techniques to set up, extend, and maintain networks. The third edition covers Red Hat Linux. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780131480056
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall
  • Publication date: 7/28/2010
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 4
  • Pages: 1279
  • Sales rank: 145,964
  • Product dimensions: 7.12 (w) x 8.78 (h) x 1.66 (d)

Meet the Author

Evi Nemeth has retired from the Computer Science faculty at the University of Colorado. She is currently exploring the Pacific on her 40-foot sailboat named Wonderland. Garth Snyder has worked at NeXT and Sun and holds a BS in Engineering from Swarthmore College and an MD and an MBA from the University of Rochester. Trent R. Hein is the co-founder of Applied Trust, a company that provides IT infrastructure consulting services. Trent holds a BS in Computer Science from the University of Colorado. Ben Whaley is the Director of Enterprise Architecture at Applied Trust. Ben earned a BS in Computer Science from the University of Colorado. He is an expert in storage management, virtualization, and web infrastructure.

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Read an Excerpt

Preface

When we were writing the first edition of this book in the mid-1980s, we were eager to compare our manuscript with other books about unix system administration. To our delight, we could find only three.

These days, you have your choice of at least fifty. Here are the features that distinguish our book:

We take a practical approach. Our purpose is not to restate the contents of your manuals, but rather to give you the benefit of our collective experience in system administration. This book contains plenty of war stories and a wealth of pragmatic advice.

We cover unix networking in detail. It is the most difficult aspect of unix system administration, and the area in which we can most likely be of help to you.

We do not oversimplify the material. Our examples reflect true-life situations, with all their warts and unsightly complications. In most cases, the examples have been taken directly from production systems.

We emphasize the use of software tools. Every piece of software mentioned in the text is either a standard unix tool, or is included on the cd-rom at the back of this book sometimes both, since many vendors don't do a perfect job of keeping up with new releases.

We cover all the major variants of unix. Our Six Example Systems There are two main flavors of unix: one from AT&T (original) and one from the University of California, Berkeley (extra crispy). Neither AT&T nor Berkeley is still active in the unix marketplace, but the terms at&t unix and Berkeley unix survive for historical reasons.

This book covers six different operating systems:

Solaris 2.4 SunOS 4.1.3
hp-ux 9.0 dec'sosf/1 2.0
irix 5.2 bsd/os 1.1

We chose these systems because they are among the most popular, and because they illustrate a broad range of approaches to unix administration. The systems in the left column are predominantly derived from AT&T unix, while those on the right are more like Berkeley unix. We provide detailed information about each of these example systems for every topic that we discuss. Comments specific to a particular operating system are marked with the manufacturer's logo. There are many other versions of unix. Most fall within the range of variation defined by these six systems, but a few (such as aix and sco) are so beautifully strange that they must be taken on their own terms.

The Organization of this Book.

This book is divided into three large chunks: Basic Administration, Networking, and Bunch o Stuff. Basic Administration provides a broad overview of unix from a system administrator's perspective. The chapters in this section cover most of the facts and techniques needed to run a stand-alone unix system.

The Networking section describes the protocols used on unix systems and the techniques used to set up, extend, and maintain networks. High-level network software is also covered here. Among the featured topics are the Domain Name System, the Network File System, network routing, and sendmail.

Bunch o Stuff includes a variety of supplemental information. Some chapters discuss optional software packages such as uucp and the unix printing system. Others give sage advice on topics ranging from hardware maintenance to disk space management to the politics of running a unix installation.

Aout the CD-ROM.

The cd-rom contains software and reference information that we recommend for system administrators. Most of the items on the cd-rom are available over the Internet, but you may find the cd-rom faster and more convenient to use.

The cd-rom uses the iso-9660 format, which is supported by most computers (including our six example systems). This format does not allow filenames longer than eight characters, so we have packaged up the tools using the standard unix tar command. Decoding instructions are included at the back of this book.

The cd-rom will be updated on an approximately yearly basis. To determine the age of your copy, check the date printed on the cd-rom itself.

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Table of Contents

Introduction 6

Part 1 Making Life Miserable for the Liberal Party 9

Part 2 Keating's Way with Words 38

Part 3 KEATING! The Musical We Had to Have 174

Further Reading 184

Acknowledgments 186

Illustration Sources 187

Index 189

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Preface

Preface

When we were writing the first edition of this book in the mid-1980s, we were eager to compare our manuscript with other books about UNIX system administration. To our delight, we could find only three. These days, you have your choice of at least fifty. Here are the features that distinguish our book:

  • We take a practical approach. Our purpose is not to restate the contents of your manuals but rather to give you the benefit of our collective experience in system administration. This book contains numerous war stories and a wealth of pragmatic advice.
  • We cover UNIX networking in detail. It is the most difficult aspect of UNIX system administration, and the area in which we think we can most likely be of help to you.
  • We do not oversimplify the material. Our examples reflect true-life situations, with all their warts and unsightly complications. In most cases, the examples have been taken directly from production systems.
  • We emphasize the use of software tools. Every piece of software mentioned in the text is either a standard UNIX tool or is freely available from the Internet—sometimes both, since many vendors don't do a perfect job of keeping up with new releases.
  • We cover all the major variants of UNIX.

Our four example systems

There have historically been two main flavors of UNIX: one from AT&T (known generically as System V) and one from the University of California, Berkeley (known as BSD). Neither AT&T nor Berkeley is still active in the UNIX marketplace, but the terms "AT&T UNIX" and "Berkeley UNIX" live on.This book covers four differentsystems:

  • Solaris 2.7
  • HP-UX 11.00
  • Red Hat Linux 6.2
  • FreeBSD 3.4 (and bits of 4.0)

We chose these systems because they are among the most popular and because they illustrate a broad range of approaches to UNIX administration. The first two systems are similar to AT&T UNIX, FreeBSD is a direct descendant of Berkeley UNIX, and Red Hat Linux is something of a mix.

We provide detailed information about each of these example systems for every topic that we discuss. Comments specific to a particular operating system are marked with the manufacturer's logo.

There are many other versions of UNIX. Most fall within the range of variation defined by these four systems, but a few (such as AIX and SCO) are so beautifully strange that they must be taken on their own terms.

The organization of this book

This book is divided into three large chunks: Basic Administration, Networking, and Bunch o' Stuff.

Basic Administration provides a broad overview of UNIX from a system administrator's perspective. The chapters in this section cover most of the facts and techniques needed to run a stand-alone UNIX system.

The Networking section describes the protocols used on UNIX systems and the techniques used to set up, extend, and maintain networks. High-level network software is also covered here. Among the featured topics are the Domain Name System, the Network File System, routing, sendmail, and network management.

Bunch o' Stuff includes a variety of supplemental information. Some chapters discuss optional software packages such as the UNIX printing system (or more accurately, system ranging from hardware maintenance to the politics of running a UNIX installation.

Contact information

In this edition, we're pleased to welcome Adam Boggs, Rob Braun, Dan Crawl, Ned McClain, Lynda McGinley, and Todd Miller as contributing authors. We've turned to them for their deep knowledge in a variety of areas (and also for their ability to function amid the shifting sands of this book and its temperamental parents). Their contributions have greatly enriched the overall content of the book and the collective experience that we're able to share with you.

Please send suggestions, comments, typos, and bug reports to sa-book@admin.com. We answer all mail, but please be patient; it is sometimes a few days before one of us is able to respond. To get a copy of our current bug list and other late-breaking information, visit our web site at www.admin.com.

We hope you enjoy this book, and we wish you the best of luck with your adventures in system administration!

Evi Nemeth
Garth Snyder
Scott Seebass
Trent R. Hein

June, 2000

Read More Show Less

Introduction

Preface

When we were writing the first edition of this book in the mid-1980s, we were eager to compare our manuscript with other books about UNIX system administration. To our delight, we could find only three. These days, you have your choice of at least fifty. Here are the features that distinguish our book:

  • We take a practical approach. Our purpose is not to restate the contents of your manuals but rather to give you the benefit of our collective experience in system administration. This book contains numerous war stories and a wealth of pragmatic advice.
  • We cover UNIX networking in detail. It is the most difficult aspect of UNIX system administration, and the area in which we think we can most likely be of help to you.
  • We do not oversimplify the material. Our examples reflect true-life situations, with all their warts and unsightly complications. In most cases, the examples have been taken directly from production systems.
  • We emphasize the use of software tools. Every piece of software mentioned in the text is either a standard UNIX tool or is freely available from the Internet—sometimes both, since many vendors don't do a perfect job of keeping up with new releases.
  • We cover all the major variants of UNIX.

Our four example systems

There have historically been two main flavors of UNIX: one from AT&T (known generically as System V) and one from the University of California, Berkeley (known as BSD). Neither AT&T nor Berkeley is still active in the UNIX marketplace, but the terms "AT&T UNIX" and "Berkeley UNIX" live on.This book covers four different operatingsystems:

  • Solaris 2.7
  • HP-UX 11.00
  • Red Hat Linux 6.2
  • FreeBSD 3.4 (and bits of 4.0)

We chose these systems because they are among the most popular and because they illustrate a broad range of approaches to UNIX administration. The first two systems are similar to AT&T UNIX, FreeBSD is a direct descendant of Berkeley UNIX, and Red Hat Linux is something of a mix.

We provide detailed information about each of these example systems for every topic that we discuss. Comments specific to a particular operating system are marked with the manufacturer's logo.

There are many other versions of UNIX. Most fall within the range of variation defined by these four systems, but a few (such as AIX and SCO) are so beautifully strange that they must be taken on their own terms.

The organization of this book

This book is divided into three large chunks: Basic Administration, Networking, and Bunch o' Stuff.

Basic Administration provides a broad overview of UNIX from a system administrator's perspective. The chapters in this section cover most of the facts and techniques needed to run a stand-alone UNIX system.

The Networking section describes the protocols used on UNIX systems and the techniques used to set up, extend, and maintain networks. High-level network software is also covered here. Among the featured topics are the Domain Name System, the Network File System, routing, sendmail, and network management.

Bunch o' Stuff includes a variety of supplemental information. Some chapters discuss optional software packages such as the UNIX printing system (or more accurately, systems ). Oth ranging from hardware maintenance to the politics of running a UNIX installation.

Contact information

In this edition, we're pleased to welcome Adam Boggs, Rob Braun, Dan Crawl, Ned McClain, Lynda McGinley, and Todd Miller as contributing authors. We've turned to them for their deep knowledge in a variety of areas (and also for their ability to function amid the shifting sands of this book and its temperamental parents). Their contributions have greatly enriched the overall content of the book and the collective experience that we're able to share with you.

Please send suggestions, comments, typos, and bug reports to sa-book@admin.com. We answer all mail, but please be patient; it is sometimes a few days before one of us is able to respond. To get a copy of our current bug list and other late-breaking information, visit our web site at www.admin.com.

We hope you enjoy this book, and we wish you the best of luck with your adventures in system administration!

Evi Nemeth
Garth Snyder
Scott Seebass
Trent R. Hein

June, 2000

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2011

    one of the better & recent Books for SA

    Of you work or worked as a system admin on different flavor of unix/linux you will enjoy this book as a reference "how to" on all unix/linux questions

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2011

    Great linux reference

    Easy to understand and follow. This is a complete linux guide

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 11, 2012

    Some mistypos

    Be aware of nook version. Compared to real book, the nook book has some misrypos for example on page 245 when adding array back, correct command is "mdadm /dev/md0 -a" as it is in a real book, nook instead of "-a" has "-r" which stands for "remove".

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 24, 2011

    Cant even download

    I dont know about nook as an on demand tool apps and books like this take days to get the backend files in order before u can download very dissapointing

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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