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Unknown Pleasures
     

Unknown Pleasures

4.7 6
by Joy Division
 

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It even looks like something classic, beyond its time or place of origin even as it was a clear product of both -- one of Peter Saville's earliest and best designs, a transcription of a signal showing a star going nova, on a black embossed sleeve. If that were all Unknown Pleasures was, it wouldn't be discussed so much, but the

Overview

It even looks like something classic, beyond its time or place of origin even as it was a clear product of both -- one of Peter Saville's earliest and best designs, a transcription of a signal showing a star going nova, on a black embossed sleeve. If that were all Unknown Pleasures was, it wouldn't be discussed so much, but the ten songs inside, quite simply, are stone-cold landmarks, the whole album a monument to passion, energy, and cathartic despair. The quantum leap from the earliest thrashy singles to Unknown Pleasures can be heard through every note, with Martin Hannett's deservedly famous production -- emphasizing space in the most revelatory way since the dawn of dub -- as much a hallmark as the music itself. Songs fade in behind furtive noises of motion and activity, glass breaks with the force and clarity of doom, minimal keyboard lines add to an air of looming disaster -- something, somehow, seems to wait or lurk beyond the edge of hearing. But even though this is Hannett's album as much as anyone's, the songs and performances are the true key. Bernard Sumner redefined heavy metal sludge as chilling feedback fear and explosive energy, Peter Hook's instantly recognizable bass work at once warm and forbidding, Stephen Morris' drumming smacking through the speakers above all else. Ian Curtis synthesizes and purifies every last impulse, his voice shot through with the desire first and foremost to connect, only connect -- as "Candidate" plaintively states, "I tried to get to you/You treat me like this." Pick any song: the nervous death dance of "She's Lost Control"; the harrowing call for release "New Dawn Fades," all four members in perfect sync; the romance in hell of "Shadowplay"; "Insight" and its nervous drive toward some sort of apocalypse. All visceral, all emotional, all theatrical, all perfect -- one of the best albums ever.

Product Details

Release Date:
01/13/2008
Label:
London Import
UPC:
0639842822329
catalogNumber:
428223
Rank:
8556

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Unknown Pleasures 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Riane-Ai-Jon More than 1 year ago
exactly as described. The bonus live recordings on the second disk are an amazing extra for anyone who loves this band like I do. Definitely recommend.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is truly a remarkable album! Ian Curtis probably didn't realize the influence of his music & lyrics would last long after Joy Division. She's Lost Control is one of the catchiest songs on the album, but it is not the sugar coated dance song some are used to. To listen is to be enthralled!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Deep, dark, murky... and, not surprisingly, rockin'. Ian Curtis channels Morrison, Bowie and various other tortured characters while Sumner and co. provide a sonic landscape that would become a textbook for 80's British alt-rock and later American goth metal. 10 great songs, no filler- a post-punk masterpiece!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago