Unpackaging Art of the 1980s

Overview

American art of the 1980s is as misunderstood as it is notorious. Critics of the time feared that market hype and self-promotion threatened the integrity of art. They lashed out at contemporary art, questioning the validity of particular media and methods and dividing the art into opposing camps. While controversies have since subsided, critics still view art of the 1980s as a stylistic battlefield. Alison Pearlman rejects this picture, which is truer of the period's criticism ...

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Overview

American art of the 1980s is as misunderstood as it is notorious. Critics of the time feared that market hype and self-promotion threatened the integrity of art. They lashed out at contemporary art, questioning the validity of particular media and methods and dividing the art into opposing camps. While controversies have since subsided, critics still view art of the 1980s as a stylistic battlefield. Alison Pearlman rejects this picture, which is truer of the period's criticism than of its art.

Pearlman reassesses the works and careers of six artists who became critics' biggest targets. In each of three chapters, she pairs two artists the critics viewed as emblematic of a given trend: Julian Schnabel and David Salle in association with Neo-Expressionism; Jean-Michel Basquiat and Keith Haring vis-à-vis Graffiti Art; and Peter Halley and Jeff Koons in relation to Simulationism. Pearlman shows how all these artists shared important but unrecognized influences and approaches: a crucial and overwhelming inheritance of 1960s and 1970s Conceptualism, a Warholian understanding of public identity, and a deliberate and nuanced use of past styles and media. Through in-depth discussions of works, from Haring's body-paintings of Grace Jones to Schnabel's movie Basquiat, Pearlman demonstrates how these artists' interests exemplified a broader, generational shift unrecognized by critics. She sees this shift as starting not in the 1980s but in the mid-1970s, when key developments in artistic style, art-world structures, and consumer culture converged to radically alter the course of American art.

Unpackaging Art of the 1980s offers an innovative approach to one of the most significant yet least understood episodes in twentieth-century art.

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Editorial Reviews

The Art Book

"Alison Pearlman's account of New York art in the 1980s is a greatly overdue corrective to the dominant paradigms of critical postmodernism, releasing the debate on this pivotal era from a 'state of suspended cartoon animation'... Pearlman's book is crucial reading for anyone interested in American art and compulsory for anyone who has failed to comprehend the seismic shift in art's culture that has triumphed in the past 25 years."

— Neil Mulholland

Library Journal
Pearlman (Art Ctr. Coll. of Design, CA) presents a scholarly reappraisal of New York's East Village artists of the 1980s, focusing on Julian Schnabel, David Salle, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Keith Haring, Peter Halley, and Jeff Koons. She studies the "packaging process," the manner by which art made its way into the marketplace and was defined by the media, by analyzing the reception the artists received from a core group of critics, among them Benjamin Buchloh, Hal Foster, and Douglas Crimp. Pearlman contends that these critics-who stand out for their political, impassioned, partisan writings-dismissed much Eighties art as commercial and cynical, not sufficiently avant-garde or anti-establishment. From the perspective of 20 years' remove, Pearlman tests these critics' conclusions by conducting extensive interviews with curators, critics, and gallery owners, while also studying closely the artworks themselves. Offering a more nuanced appraisal of the art than was offered in the Eighties, she points out the influence that Conceptual Art and Andy Warhol had on these artists. She also concludes that these artists were exceptionally smart semioticians, "reading" consumer culture and incorporating these critical readings into their art, and that they consciously manipulated diverse art styles to further their artistic goals. For libraries serving art historians and graduate-level students.-Michael Dashkin, PricewaterhouseCoopers, New York Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780226651453
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press
  • Publication date: 6/28/2003
  • Edition description: 1
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 239
  • Sales rank: 1,020,383
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Alison Pearlman is on the faculty of the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California. She is coauthor of Life, Death, Love, Hate, Pleasure, Pain: Selected Works from the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, Collection.

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments Introduction
1. 1980s Art Polemics and Their Legacy
2. Julian Schnabel, David Salle, and the Art of Stylistic Synthesis
3. Jean-Michel Basquiat, Keith Haring, and the Art of Subcultural Distinction
4. Peter Halley, Jeff Koons, and the Art of Marketing- and Consumption-Analysis
5. 1980s Art and the Usage of Style Notes Works Cited Index

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