The Unpossessed

The Unpossessed

by Tess Slesinger
     
 

   The first depiction of radical chic in fiction, The Unpossessed (1934) follows a group of Greenwich Village intellectuals engaged in founding a magazine. In relating the stories of three couples, the novel raises questions that still torment women and men today: Is marriage a viable institution? Should one bear children in hard times?

Overview


   The first depiction of radical chic in fiction, The Unpossessed (1934) follows a group of Greenwich Village intellectuals engaged in founding a magazine. In relating the stories of three couples, the novel raises questions that still torment women and men today: Is marriage a viable institution? Should one bear children in hard times? Does sexuality destroy the possibility of significant political action? And what is the political responsibility of intellectuals?

Editorial Reviews

Village Voice
It's sophisticated...satiric, then ecstatic, alternating social criticism with displays of sexual and intellectual coquetry.
Publishers Weekly
The farce or is it the tragedy? of New York leftist intellectuals done in by free love is gleefully taken up in The Unpossessed, the newly reissued 1934 comic novel by Tess Slesinger (1905-1945). Among the union organizers, academics, activists and slumming society folk who make up the cast are transplanted New Englander Miles ("his... conscience ticking neatly on his desk, beside the clock"); philanderer and mediocre novelist Jeffrey Blake, who gets it on with Comrade Fisher, a militant Trotskyite; and the droning Marxist professor Bruno Leonard. Several of these characters are, of course, planning to start a magazine. Slesinger, a New York native, moved in the same circles as Lionel Trilling, Clifton Fadiman and other famed liberal intellectuals, who seem to have provided her with rich material. Introduction by Elizabeth Hardwick. (Sept. 26) Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780935312218
Publisher:
Feminist Press at CUNY, The
Publication date:
01/01/1993
Series:
Novels of the Thirties Series
Edition description:
1st Feminist Press ed
Pages:
412
Product dimensions:
5.40(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.90(d)

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