Unreasonable Doubt: Circumstantial Evidence and an Ordinary Murder in New Haven

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Overview

It was to all appearances an ordinary murder—many might have said that it was an open-and-shut case. But some jurors were not convinced, and the taint of reasonable doubt led one of them to question the very future of our legal system.
            For many Americans, the civic responsibility of jury duty might seem an inconvenience; for Norma Thompson, it was a unique opportunity to bring her expertise to bear on the state of trial procedures in America today. With a background in political science, literature, and the classics, Thompson served as jury foreman in a trial of an “ordinary” murder in New Haven, Connecticut. Deliberations were buffeted by crosswinds of common sense and strong emotion. The trial ended in a hung jury because of what Thompson calls the “unreasonable doubts” of two fellow jurors concerning circumstantial evidence in an age when DNA testing holds out the promise of irrefutable proof.
In a compelling tale of contrasting rhetoric, Thompson takes readers into the courtroom to hear a streetwise convict verbally sparring with the D.A., then brings us into the confines of the jury room to have us witness nervous chatter over the meaning of evidence. She also contrasts this ordinary murder with the concurrent brutal stabbing of a Yale student, a case that attracted considerably more police and media attention.
            Thompson argues that the indeterminate results of the trial are symptomatic of larger problems in the justice system and society and that the reluctance of most people today to be judgmental is damaging the criminal justice system. As an antidote, she suggests that great literary and historical texts can help us develop the capacity for prudential judgment. Gleaning insights from an imaginary jury of Tocqueville and Plato, Jane Austen and William Faulkner, among other writers and thinkers, Thompson shows how confrontation with the works of such authors can help model more proper habits of deliberation.
            Blending personal memoir, social analysis, and literary criticism, Unreasonable Doubt is a challenging book that deals squarely with the evasion of judgment in contemporary political, social, and legal affairs. Brimming with brilliant insights, it suggests that the foundations for thought and action in our time have been neglected as a result of the wall erected between the social sciences and the humanities and invites readers to consider jury duty in a new light. Through real-world drama and literary reflection, it shows us that there is more to politics than power—and more of value to be found in the humanities than we may have supposed.

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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Imagine Herodotus announcing a murder verdict reached by jurors Jane Austen, Plato, William Faulkner, and other classic and modern writers and thinkers who have marked our civilization. Such a jury, posits Thompson (assoc. director, Whitney Humanities Ctr., Yale), would ensure that no unreasonable doubt marred the deliberations and that transparent and universal standards of logic and reasoning applied, the opposite of what she experienced in the actual case in New Haven, CT, referred to in the subtitle. (For that trial, Thompson was the jury foreperson.) She feels that, in examining circumstantial evidence, the bedrock evidence for nearly all serious prosecutions, a jury guided by reason-as influenced by the great writings of our collective civilization-would be moved to reach verdicts that decide and do not evade difficult issues of fact, credibility, and reliability. True-crime fans will enjoy the insights into the behind-the-scenes work of a murder jury, and general readers will marvel at the wisdom of literature applied to decision making. Recommended for popular reading and for advanced study of classics and literature.-Gilles Renaud, Ontario Court of Justice, Cornwall, Ont. Political Science Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780826216380
  • Publisher: University of Missouri Press
  • Publication date: 3/28/2006
  • Edition description: bibliography, index
  • Pages: 224
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Norma Thompson is Senior Lecturer in the Humanities and Associate Director of the Whitney Humanities Center at Yale University. She is the author or editor of several books, most recently The Ship of State: Statecraft and Politics from Ancient Greece to Democratic America.

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