Unsung Sondheim

Unsung Sondheim

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As album producer Bruce Kimmel points out in his liner notes to Unsung Sondheim, Broadway composer/lyricist Stephen Sondheim has a rule against utilizing what are called "trunk" songs, i.e., the common practice of recycling material written for one project into another. He is not averse, however, to collections like this, in which…  See more details below

Overview

As album producer Bruce Kimmel points out in his liner notes to Unsung Sondheim, Broadway composer/lyricist Stephen Sondheim has a rule against utilizing what are called "trunk" songs, i.e., the common practice of recycling material written for one project into another. He is not averse, however, to collections like this, in which songs and instrumental music that either were never used or never recorded are assembled into a rarities anthology. Such a set, ranging over decades and a myriad of different works, is necessarily disparate. But, as usual, Sondheim's high standard makes it worthwhile, especially to his fans. Those fans probably will know that his first intended Broadway musical was a show called Saturday Night that had a completed score when it was scuttled in 1955 after its theatrical producer died suddenly. Four songs from that score are performed here, among them the amusing "In the Movies," which contrasts life as it is depicted on the screen and life as it was lived in Brooklyn during the Great Depression. Sondheim is known to be a movie fan even though he has rarely written for the screen, and there are examples of those rarities here, including "What Can You Lose?," which was used in Warren Beatty's Dick Tracy, "Goodbye for Now," the love theme from Beatty's Reds, and "Water Under the Bridge," written for a movie musical called Singing Out Loud that never went into production. Of particular interest are a couple of extended instrumental pieces, incidental music used in two plays written by Sondheim collaborator Arthur Laurents, Invitation to a March and The Enclave. The music doesn't sound like typical scoring (if there is such a thing for a stage play), but rather comes off as modern classical music. Perhaps most familiar to Sondheim fans will be songs that were written for but cut from shows like Anyone Can Whistle ("There's Always a Woman"), Company ("Multitudes of Amys"), and Follies ("That Old Piano Roll"). The songs are effectively performed by a bevy of Broadway singers including Kaye Ballard, Judy Kaye, and Rebecca Luker.

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Product Details

Release Date:
06/04/2002
Label:
Varese Sarabande
UPC:
0030206213621
catalogNumber:
062136

Related Subjects

Tracks

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Album Credits

Performance Credits

Ron Tierno   Drums
Walter Willison   Track Performer
Marilyn Cooper   Track Performer
Debbie Gravitte   Track Performer
Rebecca Luker   Track Performer
Davis Gaines   Track Performer
Susan Panny   Horn
David Loud   Piano
Dave Rogers   Trumpet
Mark Minkler   Bass
Nick Armstrong   Viola
Bjorn Massaget   Piano
James Stenborg   Piano
Guy Stroman   Track Performer
Bill Meade   Reeds
Harry Groener   Track Performer
Larry Guy   Clarinet
Judy Kaye   Track Performer
Kaye Ballard   Track Performer
Sally Mayes   Track Performer
Jeffrey Arestad   Violin
John Blanchard   Flute
Richard Centalonza   Reeds
David Engel   Track Performer
Laurence Etkin   Trumpet
Ted Hoyle   Cello
Karen Lindquist   Harp
Larry Raben   Track Performer
Beth Ravin   Percussion
Kenny Rupp   Trombone
Richard Ruttenberg   Keyboards
Liz Callaway   Track Performer
Jason Graae   Track Performer
Judy Kuhn   Track Performer
Steve Marzullo   Piano
Michael Rupert   Track Performer
Crista Moore   Track Performer
Lynnette Perry   Track Performer
Stan Chandler   Track Performer

Technical Credits

Ken Feldman   Engineer
Tony Walton   Artwork,Cover Art
James Stenborg   Director,Musical Director
Geoffrey Daking   Engineer
Paul Gemignani   Percussion Arrangement
Bruce Kimmel   Producer
Larry Moore   Orchestration
James Raitt   Vocal Arrangements,Arranger
Richard Ruttenberg   Programming,Producer
Barry Allyn Singer   Liner Notes
Vincent Cirilli   Engineer

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Unsung Sondheim 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago