Until I Met You

Until I Met You

5.0 2
by Melissa Morgan
     
 
Many jazz critics have gotten rather cynical hearing new CDs by unfamiliar female vocalists, since there seems to be a disproportionate number of them and far too many are not worth hearing. Fortunately, Melissa Morgan's debut for Telarc exudes both confidence and skill in her interpretations of both standards and rarely heard gems, backed by a strong, young rhythm

Overview

Many jazz critics have gotten rather cynical hearing new CDs by unfamiliar female vocalists, since there seems to be a disproportionate number of them and far too many are not worth hearing. Fortunately, Melissa Morgan's debut for Telarc exudes both confidence and skill in her interpretations of both standards and rarely heard gems, backed by a strong, young rhythm section anchored by pianist Gerald Clayton and guitarist Randy Napoleon. Her insistent take of Louis Jordan's "Is You Is or Is You Ain't My Baby" pulses with energy, then she follows it up with a delightfully swinging and expressive take of "Until I Met You" (a vocal version of "Corner Pocket," which rhythm guitarist Freddie Green wrote for Count Basie), featuring a crisp understated solo by rising young trumpeter Christian Scott in a potent chart by trombonist Francisco Torres, who also appears on the track. Morgan's sassy take of the blues "Cool Cool Daddy" is equally convincing. As for standards, take your pick: Morgan's bluesy, slowly savored treatment of "The More I See You" and playful, expressive interpretation of "A Sleepin' Bee" bring new life to these old chestnuts. This is an encouraging beginning for Melissa Morgan.

Product Details

Release Date:
04/28/2009
Label:
Telarc
UPC:
0089408368424
catalogNumber:
83684
Rank:
118957

Related Subjects

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Melissa Morgan   Primary Artist
Francisco Torres   Trombone,Horn
Joe Sanders   Upright Bass
Joe Sanders & His Orchestra   Bass,Rhythm Section
Christian Scott   Trumpet
Melissa Morgan   Vocals
Randy Napoleon   Guitar,Rhythm Section
Tim Green   Alto Saxophone
Ben Wendel   Horn,Tenor Saxophone
Gerald Clayton   Piano,Rhythm Section
Kevin Kannar   Drums

Technical Credits

Maurice Ravel   Composer
Freddie Green   Composer
Louis Jordan   Composer
Buddy Johnson   Composer
Richard Evans   Composer
Harold Arlen   Composer
Cecil Gant   Composer
Peter DeRose   Composer
Chris Dunn   Producer
Sid Feller   Composer
Mack Gordon   Composer
Don Murray   Engineer
Mitchell Parish   Composer
Rick Ward   Composer
Harry Warren   Composer
Robert Woods   Executive Producer,Audio Production
Francisco Torres   Arranger
Truman Capote   Composer
Bill Austin   Composer
Bert Shefter   Composer
Donald Wolf   Composer
Kevin Zinger   Management
Melissa Morgan   Producer
Traditional   Composer
Ivory Daniel   Management
Ben Wendel   Arranger
Gerald Clayton   Arranger
Pascal Kerouche   Art Direction
Raymond Laveen   Composer
Johnnie Pate   Composer

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Until I Met You 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
bigdave37 More than 1 year ago
I had read positive reviews of this new jazz singer before I purchased this album, but they didn't tell the half of it. We will hear of Melissa Morgan for years to come. Although this is her debut, she comes across as a seasoned veteran. Great vocal ability and phrasing! In an era where most female jazz vocalists try to sound like Casandra Wilson or Norah Jones, it is refreshing to hear someone who sounds original. Even when Melissa is singing a jazz standard, she puts her own stamp on the music. A must buy for serious music lovers.
Eagles08 More than 1 year ago
If you like female jazz vocalists than this CD is for you. For a young woman who did not grow up during this music's heyday she is incredible. The more times you listen the better it gets. Each selection grows on you and I can't say enough about her ability. In my opinion she is as good a vocalist as anyone around today and definitely challenges the great female jazz vocalists from the past. To steal an old phrase "Try it you'll like it".