BN.com Gift Guide

Until I Say Good-Bye: My Year of Living with Joy

( 87 )

Overview

In June 2011, Susan Spencer-Wendel learned she had amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)—Lou Gehrig's disease—an irreversible condition that systematically destroys the nerves that power the muscles. She was forty-four years old, with a devoted husband and three young children, and she had only one year of health remaining.

Susan decided to live that year with joy.

She quit her job as a journalist and spent time with her family. She built an ...

See more details below
Hardcover
$19.67
BN.com price
(Save 24%)$25.99 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (127) from $1.99   
  • New (18) from $3.41   
  • Used (109) from $1.99   
Until I Say Good-Bye: My Year of Living with Joy

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$10.99
BN.com price

Overview

In June 2011, Susan Spencer-Wendel learned she had amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)—Lou Gehrig's disease—an irreversible condition that systematically destroys the nerves that power the muscles. She was forty-four years old, with a devoted husband and three young children, and she had only one year of health remaining.

Susan decided to live that year with joy.

She quit her job as a journalist and spent time with her family. She built an outdoor meeting space for friends in her backyard. And she took seven trips with the seven most important people in her life. As her health declined, Susan journeyed to the Yukon, Hungary, the Bahamas, and Cyprus. She took her sons to swim with dolphins, and her teenage daughter, Marina, to Kleinfeld's bridal shop in New York City to see her for the first and last time in a wedding dress.

She also wrote this book. No longer able to walk or even to lift her arms, she tapped it out letter by letter on her iPhone using only her right thumb, the last finger still working.

However, Until I Say Good-Bye is not angry or bitter. It is sad in parts—how could it not be?—but it is filled with Susan's optimism, joie de vivre, and sense of humor. It is a book about life, not death. One that, like Susan, will make everyone smile.

From the Burger King parking lot where she cried after her diagnosis to a snowy hot spring near the Arctic Circle, from a hilarious family Christmas disaster to the decrepit monastery in eastern Cyprus where she rediscovered her heritage, Until I Say Good-Bye is not only Susan Spencer-Wendel's unforgettable gift to her loved ones—a heartfelt record of their final experiences together—but an offering to all of us: a reminder that "every day is better when it is lived with joy."

Read More Show Less
  • Until I Say Good-Bye
    Until I Say Good-Bye  

Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble

It took its author, three months to type this book on an iPhone, using only one thumb. Susan Spencer-Wendel wasn't vying for a Guinness world record; she was moving the only the digit she still could. Afflicted with incurable ALS (Lou Gehrig's Disease), this resolute former Florida court reporter has been living the last chapters of her life with a joyful determination. "Mine," she writes, "is a story of twinning good and good and bad fortunes, which I find profound meaning in." We guarantee that readers will be touched and inspired by this quite singular one-finger memoir. (P.S. Universal has paid two million dollars for the film rights to Ms. Spencer-Wendel's biopic that its subject will likely not live to see.)

Publishers Weekly
Journalist Spencer-Wendel discovered she was ill when her left hand suddenly became withered. As she struggles to come to terms with knowing something is wrong—not wanting to find out, then not fully believing the doctor's ALS diagnosis—she writes with courage and strength. When she gets the news, the 40-something author is in her prime, blessed with a great reporter job at the Palm Beach Post and loving family. Using benefits from an insurance policy, she quits her job and decides to take trips with her family and friends, so that she can have all of the amazing experiences she's put off and create lasting memories. She goes to the final space shuttle launch with her youngest son, having never been to Cape Canaveral, even though her home is only hours away. A few months later, joined by her best friend, she sees the aurora borealis in the Yukon. It's there that Spencer-Wendel's philosophy plays out, as it does many times more, as she briefly caught the lights before tripping and missing the rest. She is appreciative and grateful for those few seconds and banishes regrets. There are certainly moments of heartbreak that she doesn't shy away from, such as when she goes shopping for bridal dresses with her teenaged daughter, knowing she'll miss any future wedding. Spencer-Wendel's life will sadly be cut short, but in writing her story, she shows her family and friends how to go on, choosing happiness and love over fear. (Mar.)
New York Times
“Her heart-ripping book chronicles what she did immediately after her diagnosis: she decided to embrace life while death chased her down..…endearing and all too human”
USA Today
“It’s a touching and brutally honest account of one mother’s inspiring attempt to get the most out of the time she has left.”
New York Daily News
“. . . almost unbearably moving chronicle of how Spencer-Wendel went about creating lasting moments in that year for the ones she loved . . .”
U.S. News & World Report
“The tales are painfully honest, and they’re heartbreaking because we know the inevitable outcome. But mostly, they’re inspiring. Spencer-Wendel, even in the darkest of moments, remains insistent on happiness-staggeringly so.”
ABC News
“Her honesty and frustration are underscored with a wicked sense of humor . . .”
Cokie Roberts
“This heartbreaking and heartwarming good-bye will make you laugh as much as it makes you cry. Susan Spencer-Wendel’s determination to find the joy in life after having been dealt the ALS card is both inspirational and enlightening.”
Huffington Post
“All you can do . . . is to turn the pages, slack-jawed, in awe at her insistence on having powerful, individual experiences . . .”
the Oprah Magazine O
“The inspirational account of a woman whose ALS diagnosis and subsequent physical decline don’t prevent her from enjoying life to the fullest, which she proves.”
Gretchen Rubin
“Susan Spencer-Wendel had to face the question, ‘What would you do if you had a year to live?’ This profound, tender, and often funny account of her experiences will remind readers of what really matters most: love.”
AARP.com
“The mother of three children ages 7 to 15 describes her poignant last efforts to travel the world and stay close to her family and community.”
Library Journal
Diagnosed at age 45 with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig's disease), Spencer-Wendel plunged into a live-each-day-fully whirlwind that has already made news (she was spotlighted in the Wall Street Journal, and the film rights to her story have been acquired for $2.5 million). Here she recounts trips to the Yukon to see the Northern Lights, for instance, and to Northern California to meet her birth mother. Most telling, she shops in New York with her 14-year-old daughter for the wedding dress she won't live to see her daughter wear. Foreign rights have been sold to nearly 20 countries, and the first printing is 250,000 copies.
Kirkus Reviews
With the assistance of Witter (Until Tuesday: A Wounded Warrior and the Golden Retriever Who Saved Him, 2011, etc.), crime reporter Spencer-Wendel chronicles her life and the decisions she has made since being diagnosed with ALS (Lou Gehrig's disease). Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a wasting disease that progressively causes loss of control of voluntary muscle movement. In her mid-40s and a happily married mother of three with a thriving career, the author rejected the option of assisted suicide in favor of making her last years memorable despite the inevitability of increasing disability. Although not believing that her death would ruin the lives of her husband and children, she understood that it might "affect their ability to live with delight. To live with joy." Spencer-Wendel was determined to overcome her dread of losing mobility and to live her life to the fullest even as the disease progressed. As inspiration, the author found solace in Lou Gehrig's 1939 farewell speech, in which he described himself as "the luckiest man on the face of the Earth, even after 'catching a bad break.' " The author decided to spend her remaining time to travel to places she longed to see, taking friends and family with her. In this way, she left them a legacy of joyfully shared memories. One of the more difficult decisions she made was not to hoard her remaining good health. She determined that she would not search out experimental programs, nor even spare herself physical strain, even though traveling took a further toll on her mobility. Each of the trips more than met the author's expectations: a visit with her son to swim with dolphins, shopping in New York with her daughter and a journey with her husband to Romania, where they lived for the first two years of their marriage. A poignant, wise love story.
Gretchen Rubin
“Susan Spencer-Wendel had to face the question, ‘What would you do if you had a year to live?’ This profound, tender, and often funny account of her experiences will remind readers of what really matters most: love.”
Cokie Roberts
“This heartbreaking and heartwarming good-bye will make you laugh as much as it makes you cry. Susan Spencer-Wendel’s determination to find the joy in life after having been dealt the ALS card is both inspirational and enlightening.”
USA Today
“It’s a touching and brutally honest account of one mother’s inspiring attempt to get the most out of the time she has left.”
Huffington Post
“All you can do . . . is to turn the pages, slack-jawed, in awe at her insistence on having powerful, individual experiences . . .”
the Oprah Magazine O
“The inspirational account of a woman whose ALS diagnosis and subsequent physical decline don’t prevent her from enjoying life to the fullest, which she proves.”
ABC News
“Her honesty and frustration are underscored with a wicked sense of humor . . .”
New York Daily News
“. . . almost unbearably moving chronicle of how Spencer-Wendel went about creating lasting moments in that year for the ones she loved . . .”
U.S. News & World Report
“The tales are painfully honest, and they’re heartbreaking because we know the inevitable outcome. But mostly, they’re inspiring. Spencer-Wendel, even in the darkest of moments, remains insistent on happiness-staggeringly so.”
New York Times
“Her heart-ripping book chronicles what she did immediately after her diagnosis: she decided to embrace life while death chased her down..…endearing and all too human”
AARP.com
“The mother of three children ages 7 to 15 describes her poignant last efforts to travel the world and stay close to her family and community.”
O: the Oprah Magazine
“The inspirational account of a woman whose ALS diagnosis and subsequent physical decline don’t prevent her from enjoying life to the fullest, which she proves.”
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780062241450
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 3/12/2013
  • Pages: 362
  • Sales rank: 338,329
  • Product dimensions: 5.70 (w) x 8.30 (h) x 1.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Susan Spencer-Wendel was an award-winning journalist at the Palm Beach Post for almost twenty years. A graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, she holds a master's degree in journalism from the University of Florida. She has been honored for her work by the Society of Professional Journalists and the Florida Society of News Editors, and she received a lifetime achievement award for her court reporting from the Florida Bar. She lives in West Palm Beach, Florida, with her family.

Bret Witter has collaborated on five New York Times bestsellers. He lives in Decatur, Georgia.

Read More Show Less

Interviews & Essays

Questions from Cokie Roberts to Susan Spencer-Wendel:


CR: You are a journalist. Has writing about ALS helped you deal with it? How in general has writing shaped you?


SS-W: As a journalist, I am a truth teller, no matter how uncomfortable it may be. There is no pretending. This helped me a great deal to recognize the reality of ALS. I have written thousands of stories as a newspaper reporter, which prepared me. One, because I've seen all kinds of tragedy in my career. I realized bad things happen to good people on quite a regular basis. And, two, because I knew how to distill events into stories. Writing is wonderful because it forces us to crystallize our jumbled thoughts via words.

CR: When it came to literally writing this book you faced some physical challenges. Can you tell us how you ended up writing the book?


SS-W: With ALS, the tiniest muscles fail first. Like the ones in your fingers. I was no longer able to type on a regular keyboard. I did not have the strength in my finger to press the keys. So I began on an iPad. Typing each letter on the touchscreen. Then my hand began to drag across the screen. Right about then, I landed a book deal, which was a tremendous incentive to improvise. I had always used the notes function on my iPhone to jot things down. Phrasing which came to me, grocery lists, or on trips, when getting out a laptop was not possible. I loved knowing that it was always there. I'd write anywhere and everywhere. As I waited for the children at music lessons, etc. I held the phone in my left hand. Propped it flat atop my curled fingers, and used my right thumb to type 89,000 words in four months. One letter at a time. Such is the power of desire. On the phone, I can only see 7 lines at a time. Which actually is a blessing. To hyperfocus on the sentence at hand. Active verbs. Few adjectives. I had an outline, a recipe, to create the book. An absolute must for a book, I believe. Bret Witter helped so with that. He saw the full picture, the book, when I saw only a tiny screen. He reminded me where I was at when I was absolutely awash in memories.

CR: You write about looking at life joyfully. Is that what you want readers to take away from this book—that even in rough situations they can experience great joy?


SS-W: Of course. I am not trying to be Dr. Phil, but I do hope it will inspire people to set their intention to do so. And make them feel lucky...

CR: Is that message especially important for your children to hear?


SS-W: Absolutely. I hope they learn "My ma did not feel sorry for herself. So neither will I."

CR: Many people with your diagnosis would either crawl into a cave or go from doctor to doctor trying to survive a little longer. You chose not to do that. Why?


SS-W: The problem with a cave is it has no windows. And the problem with knocking on umpteen doctor doors is there is nothing behind the door. There is no cure. Period. I'm realistic. A cure, a drug, won't come in time for me. I am not giving up. I am accepting. There is a difference. It was a chain reaction in my mind. I am not sure what set off what. Like an orchid lying fallow, neglected in my side yard, and one day a bloom appears. The factors were just there. Nature itself was a factor for me. Nature is so perfect. Photosynthesis. Pollination. Conception (Huge smile!). The monarch butterflies which migrate thousands of miles to Mexico to convene there. The rainforest canopy, where ants can fly so they don't fall to the ground. The laws of physics. That objects in motion have energy. I don't have the will or motion and, ergo, the energy to fight nature, beautiful nature. Also a major factor is my husband, John. I so want him to have a chance at another life. Not saddled with the weight of an invalid wife. Desire is root of all suffering, I believe. To want something you can't have. The cure is to not want it. I practice not wanting a cure, preparing to die. Choosing the path of least resistance. Going gracefully into the night.
What about your children??? People wonder.
Remember, they are MY children. I know what is best for them. I know that they are well-provided for. I know the love that surrounds them. I know the more gracefully I accept things, so too may they. I know they have my strength. I have not wavered once in these beliefs.

CR: Your therapy—travel—was not an easy one to accomplish. You had to go through tough things physically in order to see some of those faraway places. Were the trips worth the sometimes scary situations you found yourself in?


SS-W: Absolutely. I would not use the word "scary" though. We weren't swimming with sharks. When I was exhausted at the bottom of the stairs at Wreck Beach, I wasn't scared. More just worried. I adore traveling. So it was natural to go, not difficult to accomplish at all. But not without the help of John, Nancy and Steph. If they sound like saints in the book, that's cause they are saints.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 87 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(63)

4 Star

(15)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(5)

1 Star

(2)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 87 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 15, 2013

    what an inspiration susan was to me. i am honored to have read

    what an inspiration susan was to me. i am honored to have read her story and we never look at my own disability
    the same ay again. such a beautiful lady with a remarkable joy and zest for life. may her family be blessed.


    23 out of 26 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 18, 2013

    This book is a love letter to her friends and family a garden of

    This book is a love letter to her friends and family a garden of memories .it will show you how one amazing woman did what all us mothers only wished we could do it we  knew we'd be leaving our children sooner than planned .read the book I promise it will enrich your life .you will laugh you will cry but most of all you WILL NOT put it down til you are done  !! 

    20 out of 22 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 5, 2013

    Make room on your shelf of favorites

    Diagnosed with Lou Gehrig's disease in June 2011, Susan Spencer-Wendel had every excuse in the world to fold, but instead she reached for her ace in the hole and had the courage to play it. A veteran journalist from the Palm Beach Post, Spencer-Wendel believed in her own talent as a writer and storyteller, and with it she realized the extraordinary potential in the cards she had been dealt. The result is Until I Say Good-Bye, a memoir that entertains, provokes thought, and makes you thankful for each breath you draw. If you are expecting a tearjerker chick book, your expectations will be blown to smithereens. This is a book for everyone who thinks life is worth contemplating and enjoying, everyone who likes to laugh, and everyone who loves gorgeous writing. Make room on your shelf of favorites.

    14 out of 17 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 12, 2013

    I Also Recommend:

    Extremely well written I could not put it down

    For anyone who has ALS or knows someone who has ALS this is a truly remarkable journey of a well known journalist who has ALS and the way she deals with this horrific disease. My husband has ALS and this book was very inspiring. I give it 5 stars.

    11 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 12, 2013

    I wanted to love it...

    Tragic story, admirable intent that didn't translate very impressively to the page. Not a terribly compelling read. Not great storytelling, or even dramatic events. Other than the tragedy of a life struck down so early, it isn't remarkable enough to invest the time in. I wasn't engaged enough in the family, friends or people to even continue. I wish them all well, but have so many other books to read. I didn't even finish it.

    10 out of 22 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 18, 2013

    Such courage

    I can't wait to read this book. I watched my grandma who i was extremely close to suffer from this disease. It amazes me the strength the author had to write this story with just her thumb working all written on her iphone. She done more with her thumb than most people do with their whole body. Very inspiring

    9 out of 16 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 5, 2013

    A book you won't be able to put down

    I read about this book in Guidepost Magazine and watched the video. This is one of the bravest woman and her family as she experiences her Bucket list after the diagnosis of ALS (Lou Gehrig's disease) I plan to purchase copies for several friends. It isn't sad, but truly a heroic adventure.

    5 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 30, 2013

    I was very interested in learning more about Susan's story as my

    I was very interested in learning more about Susan's story as my Mother in law was recently diagnosed with ALS.  I found myself relating to many of her daily struggles and concerns.  This book is inspiring! Her attitude and outlook on life positive, even though her outcome certain.  This book will make you appreciate your good health- remind you that tomorrow is not promised and hopefully change your attitude on life.  Best wishes to Susan and her family!

    5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 28, 2013

    I Also Recommend:

    A heartbreaking yet heart warming story. A great read! Truly ins

    A heartbreaking yet heart warming story. A great read! Truly inspirational.

    5 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 27, 2013

    I haven't read the book yet, but my five stars are to offset the

    I haven't read the book yet, but my five stars are to offset the one star from the lovesick puppy who used this area as a personal chatroom. I reported the post and hope you will too.

    5 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 8, 2013

    Everyone Should Read This Book~!!!

    Absolutely one of the BEST books I have ever read in my 60 years! It is sad, certainly, but moreso, uplifting & inspirational! Living with a chroinic disease, nothing like the author's, has made me depressed at times. No pill or therapist is better than this book; it should be required reading for doctors, therapists, all with chronic illness. I have a different outlook on my life and shall read this one again! I bought the hardcover for a friend who is not into e-books & sent it to her; I wish I could give a copy to every person I know so their lives would be viewed differently. Ms. Spencer-Wendel & her family are in my preayers now, for peace & comfort. I loved this book!!!

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 12, 2013

    Highly Recommend

    This is a great book. Susan Spencer-Wendell writes in a way that does not make you feel sad as you read it. Excellent read on ALS.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 12, 2013

    Special story, special book, special woman

    Spencer-Wendel, when faced with a difficult and terminal illness, took her life to new heights with great spirit.

    She shares her story with honesty, humor, and great generosity.

    I could not put it down and remained so touched by her and her stories ever since.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 5, 2013

    Great book

    Really enjoyed reading this book and could not put it down as I really got into it. What an inspiring story!

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 2, 2013

    One of the best books I have read in a long time. Thank you Sus

    One of the best books I have read in a long time. Thank you Susan for sharing your intimate story with the world. How blessed your family is to have this piece of you always. This book will help many in their own life struggles. My own Mother has Parkinson's and this book has helped me understand a little more her thoughts and fears.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 16, 2013

    .

    Serendipity

    3 out of 15 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 26, 2013

    I would not recommend this book

    I did not enjoy this book. I felt that Susan was bossy and rude to her friends and family. My whole book club was very excited to read this book and no one in my book club really enjoyed the book. The person that was most excited about reading the book could not even finish the book.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 1, 2013

    I am a mom - i just survived cancer......

    I couldn't go on reading this...... I'm. Not as strong as I thought. The very idea of taking my 14 year old , Sami,wedding dress shopping because i KNEW I would not be there for her wedding broke my heart. This is the first book I have EVER started that I walked away from unfinished. I. Sure its about strength and the human condition. Probably very good..... maybe even life changing..... but I couldn't finish.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 13, 2013

    Don't judge a book by its cover!

    The title sounds good but i dont know if i should get it!

    2 out of 49 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 29, 2013

    Until I say goodby

    Wonderful story! A non-fictional acount of a womans fight with ALS . Her year of givng to her family and to herself. I did not want to put it down! Anyone who is going through, or, caring for someone with this disease should read this book. Ii

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 87 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)