The Unveiling of Lhasa

Overview

In this candid look into Asian colonial supremacy, this account describes what began in December of 1903, when a border dispute escalated amid rumors of a proposed secret alliance between Russia and the religious monarchy at Lhasa. British Colonel Francis Younghusband marched his Indian troops north with a battalion of Asian laborers and special correspondent Edmund Candler from The Daily Mail in tow. This record not only describes the thrilling journey experienced by a group of men deep into the heart of Tibet, ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (5) from $15.24   
  • New (3) from $15.24   
  • Used (2) from $96.99   
Marketplace
BN.com

All Available Formats & Editions

Overview

In this candid look into Asian colonial supremacy, this account describes what began in December of 1903, when a border dispute escalated amid rumors of a proposed secret alliance between Russia and the religious monarchy at Lhasa. British Colonel Francis Younghusband marched his Indian troops north with a battalion of Asian laborers and special correspondent Edmund Candler from The Daily Mail in tow. This record not only describes the thrilling journey experienced by a group of men deep into the heart of Tibet, but also provides an interesting history of a conflict known as “The Great Game.”

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9789881909084
  • Publisher: Earnshaw Books
  • Publication date: 1/1/2011
  • Pages: 248
  • Product dimensions: 5.70 (w) x 8.20 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author

Edmund Candler was a popular war correspondent, an educator, and the principal of Mohimara College in Patiala State, India. He is the author of The Long Road to Baghdad and Youth and the East: An Unconventional Autobiography. David Leffman is a travel writer and photographer and the coauthor of The Rough Guide to China, The Rough Guide to Indonesia, and The Rough Guide to Iceland 3.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt


CHAPTER IV PHARI JONG February 15. Icy winds and suffocating smoke are not conducive to a literary style, though they sometimes inspire a rude eloquence that is quite unfit for publication. As I write we are huddling over the mess-room brazier our youngest optimist would not call it a fire. Men drop in now and then from fatigue duty, and utter an incisive phrase that expresses the general feeling, while we who write for an enlightened public must sacrifice force for euphemism. A week at Phari dispels all illusions ; only a bargee could adequately describe the place. Yet the elements, which 'feelingly persuade us' what we are, sometimes inspire us with the eloquence of discomfort. At Gautsa the air was scented with the fragrance of warm pine-trees, and there was no indication of winter save the ice on the Ammo Chu. The torrent roared boisterously beneath its frozen surface, and threw up little tentacles of frozen spray, which glistened fantastically in the sun. Three miles further up the stream the wood-belt endsabruptly; then, after another three miles, one passes the last stunted bush; after that there is nothing but brown earth and yellow withered grass. Five miles above Gautsa is Dotah, the most cheerless camp on the march. The wind blows through the gorge unceasingly, and penetrates to the bone. On the left bank of the stream is the frozen waterfall, which might be worshipped by the fanciful and superstitious as embodying the genius of the place, hard and resistless, a crystallized monument of the implacable spirit of Nature in these high places. At Kamparab, where we camped, two miles higher up the stream, the thermometer fell to 14 below zero. Close by is the meeting-place ofthe sources of the Ammo Chu. All the plain is undermined with the warrens of the l...
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)