Unweaving the Rainbow: Science, Delusion and the Appetite for Wonder

Unweaving the Rainbow: Science, Delusion and the Appetite for Wonder

4.3 19
by Richard Dawkins
     
 

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Did Newton "unweave the rainbow" by reducing it to its prismatic colors, as Keats contended? Did he, in other words, diminish beauty? Far from it, says acclaimed scientist Richard Dawkins; Newton's unweaving is the key to much of modern astronomy and to the breathtaking poetry of modern cosmology. Mysteries don't lose their poetry because they are solved: the solution

Overview

Did Newton "unweave the rainbow" by reducing it to its prismatic colors, as Keats contended? Did he, in other words, diminish beauty? Far from it, says acclaimed scientist Richard Dawkins; Newton's unweaving is the key to much of modern astronomy and to the breathtaking poetry of modern cosmology. Mysteries don't lose their poetry because they are solved: the solution often is more beautiful than the puzzle, uncovering deeper mysteries. With the wit, insight, and spellbinding prose that have made him a best-selling author, Dawkins takes up the most important and compelling topics in modern science, from astronomy and genetics to language and virtual reality, combining them in a landmark statement of the human appetite for wonder.
This is the book Richard Dawkins was meant to write: a brilliant assessment of what science is (and isn't), a tribute to science not because it is useful but because it is uplifting.

Editorial Reviews

"Like an extended stay on a brain health-farm . . .You come out feeling lean, tuned and enormously more intelligent."

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780547347356
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
04/05/2000
Sold by:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
352
Sales rank:
183,633
File size:
1 MB

Meet the Author

RICHARD DAWKINS taught zoology at the University of California at Berkeley and at Oxford University and is now the Charles Simonyi Professor of the Public Understanding of Science at Oxford, a position he has held since 1995. Among his previous books are The Ancestor’s Tale, The Selfish Gene, The Blind Watchmaker, Climbing Mount Improbable, Unweaving the Rainbow, and A Devil’s Chaplain. Dawkins lives in Oxford with his wife, the actress and artist Lalla Ward.

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Unweaving the Rainbow: Science, Delusion and the Appetite for Wonder 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 19 reviews.
Joshua Hartung More than 1 year ago
Proof that one need not tap into the ' mystical', to find an even larger appreciation of the ' world around us'.
Calatelpe More than 1 year ago
As stated in the book, Isaac Newton had been criticized for destroying the beauty of the rainbow by removing its mystery...by unweaving it. Richard Dawkins strikes back at this notion, claiming that greater beauty, and greater appreciation for that beauty, is found in understanding, not ignorance. The world becomes more wonderful for knowing how it works, not less. He even points out so many things that unweaving the rainbow lead to...that we can to "see" more than just the visible spectrum of light, using the unseen to our advantage and beauty. Music is transmitted through the air via radio waves, for instance. The ultimate conclusion of this book is that, while the processes of science might be dispassionate (and rightfully so), but what comes from it is an increased sense of wonder and joy.
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AcadianBob More than 1 year ago
Science is beautiful and enlightening. This book helps you see why.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
B3B More than 1 year ago
I found that this book had some very interesting facts, which made me want keep reading. But I also saw Dawkins complaining a lot of the time. When he just put raw facts in there that is when I enjoyed it the most, but when he started taking sides on subjects it was less enjoyable. He seemed almost contradicting with some of his statements. He told you to think for yourself, but then told you what to think in other parts. I give this book a 3/5. Nerds like me would enjoy it, but his rants are a definite turn off.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Et fitana!!!