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Up From Slavery: (Starbooks Classics Editions)
     

Up From Slavery: (Starbooks Classics Editions)

3.9 14
by Booker T. Washington, Akira Graphics (Illustrator)
 

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Up from Slavery is the 1901 autobiography of Booker T. Washington detailing his personal experiences in working to rise from the position of a slave child during the Civil War, to the difficulties and obstacles he overcame to get an education at the new Hampton University, to his work establishing vocational schools-most notably the Tuskegee Institute in Alabama-to

Overview

Up from Slavery is the 1901 autobiography of Booker T. Washington detailing his personal experiences in working to rise from the position of a slave child during the Civil War, to the difficulties and obstacles he overcame to get an education at the new Hampton University, to his work establishing vocational schools-most notably the Tuskegee Institute in Alabama-to help black people and other disadvantaged minorities learn useful, marketable skills and work to pull themselves, as a race, up by the bootstraps. He reflects on the generosity of both teachers and philanthropists who helped in educating blacks and native Americans. He describes his efforts to instill manners, breeding, health and a feeling of dignity to students. His educational philosophy stresses combining academic subjects with learning a trade (something which is reminiscent of the educational theories of John Ruskin). Washington explained that the integration of practical subjects is partly designed to reassure the white community as to the usefulness of educating black people.

This text, while certainly a biography of his life, is in fact an illustration of the problem facing African Americans by detailing the problems of one. By showing how he has risen from servitude to success, he demonstrates how others of his race can do the same, as well as how sympathizers can aid in the process.

This book was first released as a serialized work in 1900 through The Outlook, a Christian newspaper of New York. It is important to mention that this work was serialized because this meant that during the writing process, Washington was able to hear critiques and requests from his audience and could more easily adapt his paper to his diverse audience.

Washington was a somewhat controversial figure in his own lifetime, and W. E. B. Du Bois, for example, criticized some of his views. The book was, however, a best-seller, and remained the most popular African American autobiography until that of Malcolm X. In 1998, the Modern Library listed the book at #3 on its list of the 100 best nonfiction books of the 20th century.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781496104205
Publisher:
CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date:
03/01/2014
Pages:
200
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.46(d)

Meet the Author

Booker Taliaferro Washington (April 5, 1856 - November 14, 1915) was an African-American educator, author, orator, and advisor to presidents of the United States. Between 1890 and 1915, Washington was the dominant leader in the African-American community.

Washington was of the last generation of black American leaders born into slavery and became the leading voice of the former slaves and their descendants, who were newly oppressed by disfranchisement and the Jim Crow discriminatory laws enacted in the post-Reconstruction Southern states in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. In 1895 his Atlanta compromise called for avoiding confrontation over segregation and instead putting more reliance on long-term educational and economic advancement in the black community.

His base was the Tuskegee Institute, a historically black college in Alabama. As lynchings in the South reached a peak in 1895, Washington gave a speech in Atlanta that made him nationally famous. The speech called for black progress through education and entrepreneurship. His message was that it was not the time to challenge Jim Crow segregation and the disfranchisement of black voters in the South. Washington mobilized a nationwide coalition of middle-class blacks, church leaders, and white philanthropists and politicians, with a long-term goal of building the community's economic strength and pride by a focus on self-help and schooling. Secretly, he supported court challenges to segregation. Black militants in the North, led by W.E.B. DuBois, at first supported the Atlanta Compromise but after 1909 they set up the NAACP and tried with little success to challenge Washington's political machine for leadership in the black community. Decades after Washington's death in 1915, the Civil Rights movement generally moved away from his policies to take the more militant NAACP approach.

Booker T. Washington mastered the nuances of the political arena in the late 19th century which enabled him to manipulate the media, raise money, strategize, network, pressure, reward friends and distribute funds while punishing those who opposed his plans for uplifting blacks. His long-term goal was to end the disfranchisement of the vast majority of African Americans living in southern states, where most of the millions of black Americans still lived.

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Up from Slavery 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 14 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I believe this is one of the most inspiring peices of African American literiture. This autobiography of Booker T. Washington tells ofhis quest tp get an education despite all of his boyhood oppressions and turmoil. I think this is wonderful book becuase it gives you a new found respect for educators and people who want to be educated. I belive a person cannot read this book and not share in it's pride, dedication and morals of Booker. Being bornas a slave and to become what he became was such a magnificent feat for the African American race at that time. I believe whoever reads this book will feel inspired to strive for the best they can at whatever there doing. I think if everybody had the mindset of Booker T. Washington, then the world would be a better place for us, and the next generation to follow. In other words, I would recomend this book to people that need inspiration and enlightenment on achieving goals!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a great book. I di my book report on it and my tacher loved it. At first it might be kind of boring but dont give up hope. Its really a wonderful book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Washington has some very important arguments that are just as useful to incorporate into contemporary life as it was important back then.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book was formatted very poorly.  It was too distracting even for a free book.
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estefania sanchez More than 1 year ago
Havent it read it yet but looks good
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Reading about this greatman was a wonderful surprise. Everyone should have to read this book. It is very inspiring and is a feel good book. Loved it!
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
When I purchase this book and started to read it I realized that this is not the oringial book by Booker T Washington. This amke me somewhat disappointed put I also found the original available for the nook