Up in Honey's Room

Up in Honey's Room

4.2 11
by Elmore Leonard
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

German-born Walter Schoen, now living in Detroit, is a dead ringer for Heinrich Himmler. Walter's American wife, Honey Deal, doesn't know he's a German spy, but she's tired of telling him jokes he doesn't understand—it's time for a divorce. Along comes Carl Webster, the hot kid of the Marshals Service. He's looking for a German officer who escaped from a POW camp in… See more details below

Overview

German-born Walter Schoen, now living in Detroit, is a dead ringer for Heinrich Himmler. Walter's American wife, Honey Deal, doesn't know he's a German spy, but she's tired of telling him jokes he doesn't understand—it's time for a divorce. Along comes Carl Webster, the hot kid of the Marshals Service. He's looking for a German officer who escaped from a POW camp in Oklahoma. Carl's pretty sure Walter's involved, so Carl gets to know Honey, hoping she'll take him to Walter. Honey likes Carl and doesn't much care that he's married. But all Carl wants is to get his man without getting shot. It's Elmore Leonard's world—gritty, funny, and full of surprises.

About the Author
Elmore Leonard has written more than three dozen critically acclaimed books during his highly successful career, including the bestsellers The Hot Kid, Mr. Paradise, Tishomingo Blues, Be Cool, Get Shorty, and Rum Punch. Many of his books have been made into movies, including Get Shorty and Out of Sight. He lives with his wife, Christine, in Bloomfield Village, Michigan.

Read More

Editorial Reviews

Carolyn See
… reading Up in Honey's Room is like dancing with the stars, and he's the star. You don't have to teach him anything or look for flaws in the smoothness of his steps or watch to see whether there will be gaps in his plots, or whether his characters will -- if even for an instant -- slip out of character. You just get to be lost in the dance with him as he gives unimaginable depth and dimension to the phrase "easily and effortlessly."
— The Washington Post
Publishers Weekly

Set in the waning days of WWII, bestseller Leonard's disappointing 40th novel finds gunslinging U.S. marshal Carl Webster, introduced in 2005's The Hot Kid, on the trail of Jurgen Schrenk and Otto Penzler, German POWs escaped from their Okmulgee, Okla., detention camp. The pair wind up in Detroit in the care of Walter Schoen, a butcher and Himmler look-alike, with whose ex-wife, wisecracking bottle-blonde Honey Deal, Carl soon finds himself smitten. While married Carl contemplates breaking his marriage vows (Honey does anything but dissuade him), Otto disappears and a dysfunctional German spy ring—led by hard-drinking Vera Mezwa and her cross-dressing manservant, Bohdan—cozies up with Jurgen. Vera and Bohdan, meanwhile, are secretly planning to disappear, but Bohdan wants to put in the ground anyone who could later give them up to the Feds. Leonard's writing—line by line—is as sharp as ever, but the plotting is uncharacteristically clunky and the pacing is stuck in low gear. Leonard has written a lot of great books, but this isn't one of them. (May)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
Library Journal

Set in the Midwest during the last year of World War II, this book brings back Carl Webster, the U.S. marshall whom Leonard introduced in The Hot Kid. This time Carl is on the trail of two escaped German prisoners of war, one of whom aspires to be a real cowboy while the other runs off with a Jewish woman. Carl himself gets tangled up with Honey, a beautiful young woman once married to a German American butcher who prides himself on being a dead ringer for Nazi SS commander Heinrich Himmler. Carl's investigation eventually leads him to an inept Nazi spy ring and a nest of bizarre characters who could form the nucleus of a promising freak show. Compared with Leonard's other novels, Up in Honey's Roomis slow moving and doesn't have a particularly satisfying resolution. Nevertheless, its quirky characters and interesting period setting should fascinate many listeners, who will also enjoy Arliss Howard's laconic narration. Recommended for libraries with established Leonard fans.
—R. Kent Rasmussen

Kirkus Reviews
Tulsa deputy U.S. Marshal Carl Webster, his hell-raising reputation secured by The Hot Kid (2005), tangles with Nazis in a slow-motion dance in wartime Detroit. Walter Schoen, a dead ringer for Heinrich Himmler who was born the same day at the same hospital, is convinced that he's Himmler's secret twin. Apart from his oh-so-cute habit of pointing a cocked finger at his now-estranged wife Honey while passing gas, Walter isn't a lot of fun, and it's no wonder Honey left him five years ago. Now, as the war winds down, Walter's in the spotlight-not because he looks like Himmler, but for equally unlikely reasons. Otto Penzler and Jurgen Schrenk, a pair of SS officers imprisoned in Tulsa, have escaped and made a beeline for Detroit, where Walter holds court with Countess Vera Mezwa Radzykewycz and her motley retinue: transvestite cook/housekeeper Bohdan Kravchenko, rib-joint Grand Dragon Joseph J. Aubrey and obstetrician Michael Taylor. Carl Webster has followed Otto and Jurgen in cold pursuit-not because he's reluctant to capture or kill them, but because FBI agent Kevin Dean has ordered him to leave them alone until the Feds figure out what they're up to. The upshot is that the SS escapees are hiding in plain sight with Walter and company while Carl circles in frustration, unable to get any closer to them than Honey, who's perfectly willing to go to bed with both him and Jurgen. The extended tableau vivant is the perfect backdrop for the laid-back conversations in which the characters discuss love, loyalty and a plan to assassinate President Roosevelt in honor of the Fuhrer's birthday. Despite constant threats of violence and occasional doses of same, the lazy plot is almost an afterthoughtto the spectacle of a bunch of "useless spy ring guys" as compulsive as windup toys, and about as consequential.
Associated Press Staff
“As usual, (Elmore Leonard) tells his story in his flawlessly colloquial prose style, with pitch-perfect dialogue.
Booklist
"The dialogue flows as fast and smooth as any words ever uttered in the service of a story."
The Age (Melbourne
“Action-packed and pricelessly funny.”
The Age (Melbourne))
"Action-packed and pricelessly funny."
The Age (Melbourne)
"Action-packed and pricelessly funny."
USA Today
“Combines everything we love about Leonard’s works—big guns, morally clueless murderers, sexy dames and handsome lawmen. A masterpiece.”
Toronto Sun
“Honey Deal is hot, hot, hot. Classic Leonard.”
New York Times
“When you read Elmore Leonard, you enter Mr. Leonard’s world. A trip like that is its own kind of vacation.”
Buffalo News
“The kind of delicious drama that will keep you coming back for more.”
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
“A great summer read.”
Washington Post
“Reading UP IN HONEY’S ROOM is like dancing with the stars and Elmore Leonard’s the star.”
Associated Press
“As usual, (Elmore Leonard) tells his story in his flawlessly colloquial prose style, with pitch-perfect dialogue.
Boston Globe
“With Dashiell Hammett-type wit (Leonard) has once again created characters who live far beyond their storylines.”
Philadelphia Inquirer
“Elmore Leonard is still at the top of his game.”
Richmond Times-Dispatch
“It’s the cast of characters that makes readers keep turning the pages.”
St. Petersburg Times
“The wisecracks and sexy patter and vivid characters are what make Leonard a guy we’re always happy to see.”
Cleveland Plain Dealer
“A best-selling bet. Dead-perfect dialogue, deadpan humor and dead-on vivid characters typical of Leonard.”
The Times (London)
“So compulsive, so entertaining, so satisfying. Dialogue as imaginative, unpredictable and witty as we have come to expect from Leonard.”
Poughkeepsie Journal
“The pacing is fast. The dialogue is dead-on. This is vintage Leonard.”
Booklist (starred review)
“The dialogue flows as fast and smooth as any words ever uttered in the service of a story.”
Christian Science Monitor
“Bullets fly, but as with most ELmore Leonard novels, things really move when the dialogue gets going. Grade A.”
Vancouver Sun
“UP IN HONEY’S ROOM is a fun read. Leonard’s gift for dialogue is as shiny as ever.”
Seattle Times
“Proof that (Leonard) is at the top of his game.”
Newsday
“No American author has a better ear for dialogue. Leonard is as straight a shooter as his hot-kid hero.”

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780297848103
Publisher:
Gardners Books
Publication date:
09/13/2007

Related Subjects

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >