Up

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - Martin Johnson
On Up, R.E.M.'s first recording since the departure of longtime drummer Bill Berry, they prove yet again that less really can be more. Although they employ a live drummer on several tracks most notably Joey Waronker from Beck's band and Barrett Martin from Tuatara, several tracks feature the chatter of drum machines or no percussion whatsoever. The synthetic percussion that starts off "Airportman" helped induce a lot of silly hype headline writers had a field day with "Electronica for the People" and "Newer Adventures in Hi-Fi", but it was more a case of R.E.M. finding ways to turn up the tempo without becoming bombastic. Like that of Automatic for the People, the ...
See more details below
CD
$7.99
BN.com price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (CD)
  • All (24) from $1.99   
  • New (8) from $4.88   
  • Used (16) from $1.99   

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - Martin Johnson
On Up, R.E.M.'s first recording since the departure of longtime drummer Bill Berry, they prove yet again that less really can be more. Although they employ a live drummer on several tracks most notably Joey Waronker from Beck's band and Barrett Martin from Tuatara, several tracks feature the chatter of drum machines or no percussion whatsoever. The synthetic percussion that starts off "Airportman" helped induce a lot of silly hype headline writers had a field day with "Electronica for the People" and "Newer Adventures in Hi-Fi", but it was more a case of R.E.M. finding ways to turn up the tempo without becoming bombastic. Like that of Automatic for the People, the mood is deliberately ratcheted down, but it isn't quite somber. "Lotus" and "Daysleeper" are pointed and aggressive, but most of the songs are introspective and meticulously arranged. The lack of traditional percussion provides more space for mandolins, strings, and layers of keyboards. Up proves that, after 13 recordings, R.E.M. has lost none of their ambition -- or their ability to rethink the rock song.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • Release Date: 10/27/1998
  • Label: Warner Bros / Wea
  • UPC: 093624711223
  • Catalog Number: 47112
  • Sales rank: 33,921

Tracks

Disc 1
  1. 1 Airportman (4:13)
  2. 2 Lotus (4:31)
  3. 3 Suspicion (5:37)
  4. 4 Hope (5:01)
  5. 5 At My Most Beautiful (3:35)
  6. 6 The Apologist (4:29)
  7. 7 Sad Professor (4:03)
  8. 8 You're in the Air (5:23)
  9. 9 Walk Unafraid (4:33)
  10. 10 Why Not Smile (4:02)
  11. 11 Daysleeper (3:39)
  12. 12 Diminished (6:00)
  13. 13 Parakeet (4:12)
  14. 14 Falls to Climb (5:06)
Read More Show Less

Album Credits

Performance Credits
R.E.M. Primary Artist
Peter Buck Guitar
Patti Gouvas Viola
Reid Harris Viola
Mike Mills Bass
Elizabeth Murphy Cello
Heidi Nitchie Viola
Willard Shull Violin
Michael Stipe Vocals
Sou-Chun Su Violin
Joey Waronker Drums
Bill Berry Drums
David Arenz Violin
Ellie Arenz Violin
Jun-Ching Lin Violin
Christopher Rex Cello
Douglas Sommer Double Bass
Paul Murphy Leader, Viola
Jay Christy Violin
Jere Flint Conductor
Daniel Laufer Cello
Technical Credits
Peter Buck Composer, Engineer
Ted Jensen Mastering
John Keane Engineer
Patrick McCarthy Producer
Mike Mills Composer
R.E.M. Producer, String Arrangements
Michael Stipe Composer
David Henry Engineer
Michael McCoy Engineer
Eddie Horst String Arrangements
John Sharpley String Arrangements
Robert Shimp Engineer
Charlie Francis Engineer
Rob Haddock Engineer
Pat McCarthy Producer
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    A reviewer

    It takes more than a little intellectual arrogance to make a go at criticism, at least when it comes to new works of art. It's much like assuming that journalism is a sort of instant history, which of course it cannot be, because history is the product of time and impartial reflection-- not emotion, hasty judgment or opinion. Rilke, a sensitive and informed critic himself, knew about the fallibility of instant judgments. "Always trust yourself and your own feeling," he wrote in Letters To A Young Poet, "as opposed to argumentations, discussions, or introductions of that sort if it turns out that you are wrong, then the natural growth of your inner life will eventually guide you to other insights." When it comes to so-called criticism, Rilke knew, we don't often get it right the first time. Personally, I've found that to be the case with the entire post-Bill Berry R.E.M. catalogue, from Up to Around the Sun. Up, in particular, was particularly baffling upon its initial release. With loops and waves of feedback in large part replacing the familiar R.E.M. jangle, it didn't exactly blow you away upon first listen "or second listen, for that matter". It's certainly not the finest collection of R.E.M. songs ever recorded, but it's certainly not as bad as some critics would have you believe. It does, after all, contain the wry and melodic "Daysleeper," which certainly belongs in the upper echelon of the R.E.M. catalogue. Accustomed to brilliance and artistic growth with nearly every R.E.M. release, what most of us refused to acknowledge was that Up was the work of a band learning to work with each other again. Drummer Bill Berry's retirement following his illness and emergency surgery during the mid-nineties Monster tour not only left R.E.M. without its percussive engine, but it also left the band bereft of a songwriting force, as well "Berry's drunken slip of the hand while playing around on acoustic guitar, which led to the "Man In The Moon" intro, is part of the R.E.M. legend". Perhaps it's not exactly equivalent to the Who carrying on without Keith Moon, but it's close. Now, with the benefit of hindsight, it's easy to see that Up, although far from perfect, does contain a handful of unforgettable songs: "At My Most Beautiful," "Daysleeper," "You're In The Air," and "The Apologist." Personally, I have a special liking for the latter, which combines feedback and keys, countermelody and a chorus reminiscent of "South Central Rain." I'm sorry, too, for at first judging Up so harshly. Why is it that your favorite albums are often the ones you couldn't stand on first listen? Up might not be my favorite R.E.M. album, and it's certainly not among their best, but it's far better than most critics would have you believe. It's definitely worth another listen.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    A great breakup album

    7 years after it was released, Up is the R.E.M. album that has grown on me the most. An underrated masterpiece, it represents the first look at a new R.E.M., going forth without founding member Bill Berry. (Why does this website list him in the credits? He did not play on this album at all!) His departure had an effect on both the music and lyrics. Without a drummer, the band was propelled a few albums ahead of where they had been musically - singer Michael Stipe even said this himself. Drum machines and electronic flourishes pepper the album, and the effect is marvelous. "Airportman" is an intricately layered introduction with lyrics as an afterthought. From there it just gets better - the rocking "Lotus" stands out from the 13 other ballads, but nevertheless, it fits well on here. "Daysleeper" and "At My Most Beautiful" were only mild hits, but they are just as wonderful as the ubiquitous chart-toppers like "Losing My Religion." Lyrically, the album deals with loss, disappointment, and the eventual moving forward - listen to "Sad Professor" or "Diminished" (plus the one-minute guitar piece tacked on to the end of it, "I'm Not Over You") and try not to be emotionally moved. I highly recommend this album to anyone interested in expanding their musical consciousness, or wants a soundtrack to a recent breakup. If you're new to R.E.M, however, I would advise you to start with Automatic For The People, or Out Of Time (although all their albums are excellent!!)

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Nice, mellow cd

    I just listened to the Beach Boys Pet Sounds album for the first time and was blown away on how much that album is heard throughout this cd. Check it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Thoughtful, beautiful

    This is my favorite album from their Warner brothers era. Some songs annoy on first listen but the whole thing gets better with age by balancing the sentimental with the obscure. Brilliant, weird, unique, haunting.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    low-key genius

    REM's measured masterpiece provides a perfect counterpoint to the more off-the-cuff, rough-edged pleasures of 'New Adventures in Hi-Fi.' 'Up' stands as a unified body of significant work, thankfully lacking a new version of the ironically upbeat 'Shiny Happy People' or even the almost embarrassingly emotional 'Everybody Hurts.' Aside from the fractured narrative play and loping groove of 'Lotus,' the album's mood is introspective and often restrained. The somber 'Sad Professor' and sublime 'Suspicion' are especially strong standouts among the more low-key tracks. However, songs such as 'Walk Unafraid' promise a more hard-edged, hard-won catharsis only possible after intense scrutiny of the self. In the maturity of its last two albums, REM has grown from a band capable of moments of genius to a group that can create a gripping atmosphere - and recreate itself - within the space of a single well-conceived album.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews