Upon Further Review: Sports in American Literature

Overview

Over the course of the last century, American fiction writers and poets have used sports figures and sporting events in order to make significant points on themes of identity as they are connected to gender, race, class, and nationality. The contributors to this volume examine American literature that uses sports as a trope to explore or disturb core values of this country. They explore individual works in order to uncover the rich connections between those works' use of sports and issues of importance to ...

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Overview

Over the course of the last century, American fiction writers and poets have used sports figures and sporting events in order to make significant points on themes of identity as they are connected to gender, race, class, and nationality. The contributors to this volume examine American literature that uses sports as a trope to explore or disturb core values of this country. They explore individual works in order to uncover the rich connections between those works' use of sports and issues of importance to American culture from approximately 1920 to the end of the twentieth century.

Focusing on four general themes, this volume offers a range of commentary on a variety of American literature. The first section features essays that explain how sports are used by writers to explore or critique American values. The next two sections contain essays that investigate the ways in which writers have used sports to express ideas about race, class, and gender. The final section turns to questions of aesthetics, featuring essays that concentrate on form, technique, and language itself. Together, contributors cover a number of literary works that feature a wide variety of sports, from the expected (baseball) to the more surprising (body building and wilderness adventuring).

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780275980504
  • Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 8/30/2004
  • Pages: 248
  • Product dimensions: 6.20 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

MICHAEL COCCHIARALE is Assistant Professor of English at Widener University, where he teaches American Literature, creative writing, and composition courses.

SCOTT D. EMMERT is Assistant Professor of English at the University of Wisconsin--Fox Valley. He has published numerous articles in various scholarly journals.

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Table of Contents

Introduction : sports and American literature
Batters and archetypes : baseball as trope in mid-century American literature 3
"War ... may hasten this change of values" : the World War II-era writings of John R. Tunis 15
"Partway there" : the Mexican league and American conflict in Mark Winegardner's The Veracruz blues 29
"The machine-language of the muscles" : reading, sport, and the self in Infinite jest 41
White S(ox) vs. Indians : sports and unresolved cultural conflict in Native American fiction 53
Basketball's demands in Paul Beatty's The white boy shuffle 63
"Fairways of his imagination" : golf and social status in F. Scott Fitzgerald's fiction 75
Dualism and the quest for wholeness in Ama Bontemps's God sends Sunday 87
The female voice in American sports literature and the quest for a female sporting identity 99
"Monsters" and "face queens" in Harry Crews's Body 111
Hypermasculinity and sport in James Dickey's Deliverance 121
The football elegies of James Dickey and Randall Jarrell : hegemonic masculinity versus the "semifeminine mind" 131
Dancing with the bulls : engendering competition in Hemingway's The sun also rises and Silko's Ceremony 143
Fouling out the American pastoral : rereading Philip Roth's The great American novel 157
"And drive them from the temple" : baseball and the prophet in Eric Rolfe Greenberg's The celebrant 169
"The mob of carefree men and boys" : Vanity of Duluoz and Kerouac's panoramic consciousness 179
"And that's the ball game!" : cognitive linguistics, the Life is a game metaphor and the late twentieth-century southern novel 191
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