The Urban Community / Edition 1

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Overview

This reader traces the development of urban/community studies from the early days of the Chicago School of Human Ecology, through the “good old days” of ethnographies that made “Best Sellers” lists, right up to the most recent of writings about the cities and their communities. It emphasizes what is most modern, while still covering the history and sociology of urban studies—with all the hidden paradigms and evolution of ideas important to a comprehensive study of the subject. For public administration positions related to urban planning and housing.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780130984234
  • Publisher: Pearson
  • Publication date: 6/4/2003
  • Series: MySearchLab Series for Sociology Series
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 360
  • Product dimensions: 6.90 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Read an Excerpt

One of the few good reasons to construct a book of readings is getting to talk with the authors of the finest articles recently published in prestigious journals and other outlets. I asked most of them for permission to cut some parts of their articles. Who would want that to happen? Nobody, but quite readily they understood that space in books is at a premium and condensing things is routine, hence they were almost eager to allow this chopping. They also realized that students, and readers generally, prefer material that does not require deep mathematical reading. Thus, they permitted me to ax statistical tables that one must acknowledge represent a great deal of hard work and outstanding scholarship. I encourage students who have already had parametric statistics to read the complete works in the journals: I am sure you will agree that the authors, all of them, used the appropriate statistics in reaching their conclusions.

Putting together this reader required a great deal of reading, but that is no complaint. I enjoy reading urban and community sociology and urban geography and design are favorites of mine. At my campus, The University of Texas at Tyler, which opened only a couple of years before I moved here, I started and directed a master's degree in Public Planning and Administration and still teach in the area. Similarly, I started the geography program here and taught geography until we could hire a tenure-tract geographer. With these experiences my appreciation for sociology's sister disciplines continues to grow. As broad and open a discipline as sociology is, our friends in related disciplines have much to contribute to the understanding of cities and communities.

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Table of Contents

Introduction.

I. URBAN CLASSICS.

A. Urban Development: Urban Ecological Perspectives.

The Growth of the City: An Introduction to a Research Project, Ernest W. Burgess.

Human Ecology, Robert Ezra Park.

B. Human Relations: Sociocultural Perspectives.

Community and Society, Ferdinand Tönnies. The Bulk Cities and Mental Life, Georg Simmel. Urbanism as a Way of Life, Louis Wirth.

C. The Case Study: Local Community Perspectives.

Older and Newer Approaches to the Community, Roland L. Warren. Persistence of Local Sentiments in Mass Society, Albert Hunter. Types of Influentials: The Local and the Cosmopolitan, Robert K. Merton.

II. COMMUNITY IN THE MODERN CITY.

A. Community Building

Secret Gardens, William Drayton. A Neighborhood Approach to Community Building, Clare Cooper Marcus. The New Urbanism: An Alternative to Modern, Automobile-Oriented Planning and Development, Robert Steuteville. Building the Sustainable Community: Is Social Capital the Answer?, Jeffrey C. Bridger and A.E. Luloff. Training Functions of Ethnic Economies: Mexican Entrepreneurs in Chicago, Rebecca Raijman and Marta Tienda. Neighborhood Characteristics, Community Development Corporations and the Community Development Industry System: A Case Study of the American Deep South, Robert M. Silverman.

B. Community Participation.

1. Social Connections.

Loose Connections: Joining Together in America's Fragmented Communities, Robert Wuthnow. Kicking in Groups, Nicholas Lemann.

2. Social Isolation.

Neighborhood Context and the Risk of Childbearing Among Metropolitan-Area Black Adolescents, Clea A. Sucoff and Dawn M. Upchurch. Neighborhood Poverty and the Social Isolation of Inner-City African American Families, Bruce H. Rankin and James M. Quane. Urban Poverty after the Truly Disadvantaged: The Rediscovery of the Family, the Neighborhood, and Culture, Mario Luis Small and Katherine Newman.

C. Community Action.

The Effectiveness of Neighborhood Collective Action, Gustavo S. Mesch and Kent P. Schwirian. The Responsive Community: A Communitarian Perspective, Amitai Etzioni.

III. MODERN ECOLOGICAL VIEWS OF THE CITY.

A. Socio-Geographic Views.

Dumping in Dixie Revisited: The Evolution of Environmental Injustices in South Carolina, Jerry T. Mitchell, Deborah S.K. Thomas, and Susan L. Cutter. Home from Nowhere, James H. Kunstler. The Spatial Structure of Urban Ethnic Economies, David H. Kaplan.

B. Socio-Demographic Views.

Moving into Adulthood: Family Residential Mobility and First-Union Transitions, Scott M. Myers. Neighborhood Racial-Composition Preferences: Evidence from a Multiethnic Metropolis, Camille Zubrinsky Charles.

IV. THE MODERN HOLISTIC STUDY.

History Repeats Itself, but How? City Character, Urban Tradition, and the Accomplishment of Place, Harvey Molotch, William Freudenburg, and Krista E. Paulsen.

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Preface

One of the few good reasons to construct a book of readings is getting to talk with the authors of the finest articles recently published in prestigious journals and other outlets. I asked most of them for permission to cut some parts of their articles. Who would want that to happen? Nobody, but quite readily they understood that space in books is at a premium and condensing things is routine, hence they were almost eager to allow this chopping. They also realized that students, and readers generally, prefer material that does not require deep mathematical reading. Thus, they permitted me to ax statistical tables that one must acknowledge represent a great deal of hard work and outstanding scholarship. I encourage students who have already had parametric statistics to read the complete works in the journals: I am sure you will agree that the authors, all of them, used the appropriate statistics in reaching their conclusions.

Putting together this reader required a great deal of reading, but that is no complaint. I enjoy reading urban and community sociology and urban geography and design are favorites of mine. At my campus, The University of Texas at Tyler, which opened only a couple of years before I moved here, I started and directed a master's degree in Public Planning and Administration and still teach in the area. Similarly, I started the geography program here and taught geography until we could hire a tenure-tract geographer. With these experiences my appreciation for sociology's sister disciplines continues to grow. As broad and open a discipline as sociology is, our friends in related disciplines have much to contribute to the understanding of cities and communities.

Read More Show Less

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