Urban Teens In The Library

Overview

Urban Teens in the Library is the perfect solution for the concerns and uncertainty many librarians face when supporting this group of patrons and students. From a team of experts who have researched the information-seeking habits and preferences of urban teens to build better and more effective school and public library programs, this book will show readers: the importance of moving beyond stereotypes and revamping library services; the value of street lit and social networking; and how a library website can ...

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Urban Teens in the Library: Research and Practice

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Overview

Urban Teens in the Library is the perfect solution for the concerns and uncertainty many librarians face when supporting this group of patrons and students. From a team of experts who have researched the information-seeking habits and preferences of urban teens to build better and more effective school and public library programs, this book will show readers: the importance of moving beyond stereotypes and revamping library services; the value of street lit and social networking; and how a library website can meet the information needs of teens.

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Editorial Reviews

VOYA - KaaVonia Hinton
Urban literature has always been popular, from books by Donald Goines in the 1970s to more recent titles by authors like Omar Tyree and Sister Souljah. Not too long ago, adolescents had to hide such titles because adults did not want them to read about hard times on violent streets, drug deals, making fast money, and sex. Recently, librarians, teachers, and scholars have begun asking why these books should be excluded from collections, classrooms, and scrutiny. The editors and contributors of this book are well on their way to answering this question, and they have data to support their stance. More than that, this book explains that offering urban literature is only one small aspect of serving urban youth. Urban youth benefit from social networking, databases and other Web resources, space, programs, and much more. After part one, which defines who urban teens are, part two presents research about how (and if) teens use the library to locate information, use the computer, borrow books, do homework, and visit with friends. The last part takes readers right into urban libraries where they can see teens writing books, rocking the mike, surfing the net, and blogging. This book has everything libraries in urban areas need to get started helping more teens. Though it is targeted to librarians, teachers can use the strategies offered here, too. For example, tips on how to host book discussions on a blog, create photo galleries, organize writing anthologies, and use podcasting for booktalks might come in handy for language arts teachers. Reviewer: KaaVonia Hinton
School Library Journal
This work does much to explain who urban teens are and what they need from their libraries. The authors examine the existing research—some of which they have performed—that provides a wealth of data for public and school libraries. Given the challenges in serving these patrons, practical options and suggestions are invaluable, yet few of the chapters build off the research to make such recommendations. Two examples of the combination of theory and practice are found in the chapters on developing a leisure reading program and urban teens' search for health information. In addition, the four examples of best practices are also full of ideas. Other chapters, such as those on social networking and YA spaces, are more general and do not offer much guidance on applying the research to urban libraries. The chapter on street lit is a mixed bag: it provides a much-needed background to the genre, but does not explore the literature written for teenagers, such as the works of Coe Booth, Alan Sitomer, or Paul Volponi. All in all, this guide does live up to its title, combining research and practice in one volume. For a larger focus on the day-to-day aspects of serving urban teens, consult Paula Brehm-Heeger's Serving Urban Teens (Libraries Unlimited, 2008).—Melissa Rabey, Frederick County Public Libraries, Frederick, MD
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780838910153
  • Publisher: ALA Editions
  • Publication date: 12/1/2009
  • Pages: 224
  • Product dimensions: 8.40 (w) x 10.90 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Table of Contents

Pt. I Setting the Stage: Who is the Urban Teen?

Ch. 1 Who are Urban Teens, and What Does Urban Mean, Anyway? Denise E. Agosto Agosto, Denise E. Sandra Hughes-Hassell Hughes-Hassell, Sandra 3

Ch. 2 Moving Beyond the Stereotypes: Seeing Urban Teenagers as Individuals Sandra Hughes-Hassell Hughes-Hassell, Sandra Lewis Hassell Hassell, Lewis Denise E. Agosto Agosto, Denise E. 9

Pt. II Focus on Research: Research Relating to Urban Teens and Libraries

Ch. 3 Revamping Library Services to Meet Urban Teens' Everyday Life Information Needs and Preferences Denise E. Agosto Agosto, Denise E. Sandra Hughes-Hassell Hughes-Hassell, Sandra 23

Ch. 4 Developing a Leisure Reading Program That is Relevant and Responsive to the Lives of Urban Teenagers: Insights From Research Sandra Hughes-Hassell Hughes-Hassell, Sandra 41

Ch. 5 Street Lit: Before You Can Recommend It, You Have to Understand It Vanessa J. Irvin Morris Morris, Vanessa J. Irvin Denise E. Agosto Agosto, Denise E. Sandra Hughes-Hassell Hughes-Hassell, Sandra 53

Ch. 6 Urban Teens, Online Social Networking, and Library Services June Abbas Abbas, June Denise E. Agosto Agosto, Denise E. 67

Ch. 7 Urban Teens and Their Use of Public Libraries Denise E. Agosto Agosto, Denise E. 83

Ch. 8 Public Library Websites and Urban Teenagers' Health Information Needs Sandra Hughes-Hassell Hughes-Hassell, Sandra Dana Hanson-Baldauf Hanson-Baldauf, Dana 101

Ch. 9 Spacing Out With Young Adults: Translating Ya Space Concepts Into Practice Anthony Bernier Bernier, Anthony 113

Pt. III Focus on Best Practice: Model Programs From U.S. Public Libraries

Ch. 10 Youth Development and Evaluation: Lessons From "PublicLibraries as Partners in Youth Development" Elaine Meyers Meyers, Elaine 129

Ch. 11 The Loft at Imaginon: A New-Generation Library for Urban Teens Michele Gorman Gorman, Michele Amy Wyckoff Wyckoff, Amy Rebecca L. Buck Buck, Rebecca L. 143

Ch. 12 Before It's Reading, It's Writing: Urban Teens as Authors in The Public Library Autumn Winters Winters, Autumn Elizabeth J. Gregg Gregg, Elizabeth J. 153

Ch. 13 Following and Leading Teens Online: Using Digital Library Services to Reach Urban Teens Kara Reuter Reuter, Kara Sarah Cofer Cofer, Sarah Ann Pechacek Pechacek, Ann Mandy R. Simon Simon, Mandy R. 169

Works Cited 187

List of Contributors 201

Index 203

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